LA Times Crossword Answers 7 Jan 2018, Sunday

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Constructed by: Pancho Harrison
Edited by: Rich Norris

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Today’s Theme: According to Your Résumé …

Themed answers well-known noun phrases that have been clued as is if they are questioning a person’s résumé:

  • 22A. “… you’ve repaired planes for civilian pilots, but can you __?” : SERVICE ACES
  • 34A. “… you’ve made indie films, but can you __?” : DIRECT HITS
  • 40A. “… you’ve made decorative bowls, but can you __?” : FASHION PLATES
  • 69A. “… you’ve conned small-time dealers with your forgeries, but can you __?” : SNOW FENCES
  • 74A. “… you’ve monitored planets with your telescope, but can you __?” : TRACK STARS
  • 100A. “… you’ve coached gymnasts, but can you __?” : TRAIN SPOTTERS
  • 107A. “… you’ve run dining rooms, but can you __?” : HANDLE BARS
  • 125A. “… you’ve written non-theatrical prose, but can you __?” : SUPPLY LINES

Bill’s time: 19m 23s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

10. Golden __ : AGER

A golden ager is a senior citizen.

18. Bara of the silents : THEDA

Theda Bara was a silent film star from Cincinnati, Ohio. Many cite Bara as the first movie sex symbol. She wore very revealing costumes in many of her films and she often played the femme fatale character. As such, Bara’s nickname was “the Vamp”.

21. Sundance’s sweetie __ Place : ETTA

Etta Place is the schoolteacher character played by the lovely Katharine Ross in the 1969 movie “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid”.

22. “… you’ve repaired planes for civilian pilots, but can you __?” : SERVICE ACES

A flying ace is an aviator who has shot down a number of enemy planes during combat. The qualifying number of kills seems to vary, but five is common. The first use of “ace” was during WWI, when the French newspapers dubbed pilot Adolphe Pegoud “l’as” (French for “the ace”) when he shot down his fifth German plane.

26. Quasimodo’s love : ESMERALDA

The title character in Victor Hugo’s novel “The Hunchback of Notre-Dame” is Quasimodo, the hunchbacked bell-ringer . Quasimodo falls for the beautiful Roma girl Esmeralda, and eventually rescues her just before she is due be hanged. He carries Esmeralda into Notre-Dame crying out “Sanctuary!” There is some recent evidence that a hunchbacked stone carver, working at Notre-Dame at the same time Hugo was alive, may have been the inspiration for the Quasimodo the bell-ringer.

29. “The Optimist’s Daughter” Pulitzer winner Welty : EUDORA

Eudora Welty was an author from Jackson, Mississippi who wrote short stories and novels about the American South. Welty won a Pulitzer in 1973 for her novel “The Optimist’s Daughter”. She was also awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, in 1980.

31. Biblical beast : ASS

The ass or donkey is mentioned several times in the Bible. One of the most-quoted biblical stories involving an ass is the story of Balaam. Balaam was a diviner who appears in the Book of Numbers in. In one account, Balaam is held to task by an angel for particularly cruel treatment of an ass.

32. Some Miles Davis groups : OCTETS

The jazz musician Miles Davis was born into a relatively affluent family, so he had plenty of music lessons as a child. After high school, Davis studied at the Juilliard School of Music in New York but he dropped out before finishing his studies. He stated later that the Juilliard classes focused too much on European and “white” music, but he acknowledged that the school gave him a foundation in music theory that helped him in later life.

36. Govt. loan agency : SBA

The Small Business Administration (SBA) is a government agency with the mission of assisting small businesses. The SBA doesn’t give loans itself, but it does act as a guarantor under the right circumstances. The SBA was set up in 1953, and isn’t a favorite with fiscal conservatives.

37. Web page standard : HTML

The initialism “HTML” stands for HyperText Markup Language. HTML is the language used to write most Internet web pages (including this one).

39. Game show host : EMCEE

The term “emcee” comes from “MC”, an initialism standing for Master or Mistress of Ceremonies.

40. “… you’ve made decorative bowls, but can you __?” : FASHION PLATES

A fashion plate is a fashionable person, someone who dresses in the latest fashions. The term originally applied to illustrations (plates) that were used to disseminate fashionable styles in the 1800s and early 1900s.

46. Lightweight hats : PANAMAS

Panama hats are traditional headgear from Ecuador, and have never been made in Panama. The “panama” moniker came about as many of the hats were shipped to the Isthmus of Panama for transportation by sea to the rest of the world. Authentic panama hats are made from the leaves of a palm-like plant known locally as the jipijapa palm.

51. Artsy Manhattan neighborhood : SOHO

The Manhattan neighborhood known today as SoHo was very fashionable in the early 1900s, but as the well-heeled started to move uptown the area became very run down and poorly maintained. Noted for the number of fires that erupted in derelict buildings, SoHo earned the nickname “Hell’s Hundred Acres”. The area was then zoned for manufacturing and became home to many sweatshops. In the mid-1900s artists started to move into open loft spaces and renovating old buildings as the lofts were ideal locations in which an artist could both live and work. In 1968, artists and others organized themselves so that they could legalize their residential use of an area zoned for manufacturing. The group they formed took its name from the name given to the area by the city’s Planning Commission i.e “South of Houston”. This was shortened from So-uth of Ho-uston to SoHo as in the SoHo Artists Association, and the name stuck.

52. Latin clarifier : ID EST

“Id est” is Latin for “that is”, and is often abbreviated to “i.e.” when used in English.

54. Desert trial : N-TEST

Nuclear test (N-test)

55. Derring-do, e.g. : DEEDS

As one might expect, “derring-do” (plural is “derrings-do”) comes from the phrase “daring to do”, which back in the 14th century was written as “dorrying don”.

59. Many a Prado painting : GOYA

Francisco Goya was a Spanish painter, who was often called the last of the Old Masters and the first of the moderns. Two of Goya’s most famous works are “The Nude Maja” and “The Clothed Maja”.

The Museo del Prado is in Madrid, the capital of Spain, and has one of the finest art collections in the world. The gallery’s most famous work is “Las Meninas” By Velazquez.

61. Windy City rail initials : CTA

Chicago Transit Authority (CTA)

It seems that the derivation of Chicago’s nickname as the “Windy City” isn’t as obvious as I would have thought. There are two viable theories. First that the weather can be breezy, with wind blowing in off Lake Michigan. The effect of the wind is exaggerated by the grid-layout adopted by city planners after the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. The second theory is that “windy” means “being full of bluster”. Sportswriters from the rival city of Cincinnati were fond of calling Chicago supporters “windy” in the 1860s and 1870s, meaning that they were full of hot air in their claims that the Chicago White Stockings were superior to the Cincinnati Red Stockings.

69. “… you’ve conned small-time dealers with your forgeries, but can you __?” : SNOW FENCES

To fence something is to deal in stolen goods, and is a slang term. The use of “fence” in this sense dates back to about 1700, the idea being that such transactions take place under “defense of secrecy”.

77. Rhone tributary : SAONE

The Saône is a river in eastern France that joins up with the Rhône in Lyon.

80. Theater chain letters : AMC

The AMC theater chain used to go by the name American Multi-Cinema Inc., hence the initialism “AMC”.

81. “__ bigger than a breadbox?” : IS IT

I only discovered the wonderful old American TV show “What’s My Line?” a few years ago. I was familiar with the show’s British adaptation, but hadn’t spotted the US version until relatively recently in reruns. I fell in love with the beautiful Arlene Francis watching those reruns. She was a regular panelist on the show, and the embodiment of elegance. Host of the show was the erudite and genteel John Daly, a much-respected journalist and broadcaster. Daly became the son-in-law of Chief Justice Earl Warren when he married Warren’s daughter, Virginia. One of the legacies of the show is the popularization of the question “Is it bigger than a breadbox?”

90. Fairway adjoiner : ROUGH

That would be on a golf course.

93. Nike competitor : ASICS

ASICS is a Japanese company that produces athletic gear, including running shoes. The name comes from the Latin phrase “anima sana in corpore sano” which translates to “a healthy soul in a healthy body”.

95. Lang. of Livorno : ITAL

Livorno is a port city on the west coast of Italy. The city is often called “Leghorn” in English and gave its name to the leghorn breed of chicken, and by extension to the cartoon character known as Foghorn Leghorn.

100. “… you’ve coached gymnasts, but can you __?” : TRAIN SPOTTERS

People at the gym who are doing weight training will often spot for each other. This means that the person who is spotting assists in the lift, allowing the lifter to work with more weight than usual.

106. Frat letters : NUS

The Latin equivalent of the Greek letter nu is N. An uppercase nu looks just like the Latin capital N. However, the lowercase nu looks like our lowercase V. Very confusing …

111. Thickets : COPSES

A copse is a small stand of trees. The term “copse” originally applied to a small thicket that was specifically grown for cutting.

114. Actor Daniel __ Kim : DAE

Daniel Dae Kim is an American actor who is famous for playing Jin-Soo Kwon on “Lost”. Kim moved on to play one of the leads on the CBS remake of “Hawaii Five-O”, portraying the character Chin Ho Kelly.

120. Prospector’s disappointment : FOOL’S GOLD

Pyrite is a mineral, also known as a iron pyrite. Famously, it has an appearance very similar to gold, so has the nickname “fool’s gold”. Pyrite does find its way into some baubles, which go by the name of marcasite jewelry.

122. Actress Delany : DANA

Actress Dana Delaney came to the public’s attention playing the lead in the TV show “China Beach” from 1988 to 1991. More recently, she played the lead in the drama series “Body of Proof” from 2011 to 2013.

128. Early role for Ronny : OPIE

Opie Taylor is the character played by Ron Howard on “The Andy Griffith Show”. Opie lives with widowed father Andy Taylor (played by Andy Griffith) and his great-aunt Beatrice “Aunt Bee” Taylor (played by Frances Bavier). Ron Howard first played the role in 1960 in the pilot show, when he was just 5 years old. Howard sure has come a long way since playing Opie Taylor. He has directed some fabulous movies including favorites of mine like “Apollo 13”, “A Beautiful Mind” and “The Da Vinci Code”.

129. Takes the Black Friday plunge : SHOPS

In the world of retail, Black Friday is the day after Thanksgiving in the US. Black Friday is when many stores start the holiday shopping season, and so offer deep discounts to get ahead of the competition.

130. Sorbonne enrollee : ELEVE

The French word “élève” can be translated as “pupil, student”.

“Sorbonne” is the name usually used for the old University of Paris, and some of the institutions that have succeeded it. The institution was named for French theologian Robert de Sorbonne who founded the original Collège de Sorbonne in 1257. That’s quite a while ago …

131. Melanie’s “Working Girl” role : TESS

“Working Girl” is an entertaining romantic comedy film from 1988 that stars Melanie Griffith and Harrison Ford in the lead roles, with Sigourney Weaver supporting. Apparently, “Working Girl” was remade into a TV series in the nineties with Sandra Bullock starring, but it only aired for 12 episodes.

Melanie Griffith is the daughter of Tippi Hedren, the actress who starred in the Hitchcock films “The Birds” and “Marnie”. Griffith was married to fellow actor Don Johnson. Their daughter is Dakota Johnson, the female lead in the film “Fifty Shades of Grey”. Griffith was also married to Spanish actor Antonio Banderas.

134. Pittsburgh product : STEEL

The pennsylvania city of Pittsburgh was named in 1758 for British statesman and future prime minister William Pitt the Elder. Originally known as Fort Duquesne, the settlement was renamed after it was captured from the French during the Seven Years’ War. The most commonly used nicknames for Pittsburgh are “Steel City”, referring to the history of steel-related industry, and “City of Bridges”, referring to the 446 bridges in the metropolis.

Down

2. Fischer’s forte : CHESS

American Bobby Fischer was one of the greatest chess players of all time, and someone who enjoyed remarkable success at the game from a very early age. Perhaps his most famous victory was against Boris Spassky in 1992, a match held in Yugoslavia. At that time, there was a strict embargo against the country, bringing Fischer into conflict with his own government in the US, after which he roamed the world, never to return home. He lived in Hungary, Germany, the Philippines and Japan, and finally in Iceland where he died in 2008 at 54 years of age

5. African capital on its own river : NAIROBI

Nairobi is the capital and largest city in the African nation of Kenya. The city is named for the Nairobi River, which in turn takes its name from the Maasai “Enkare Nairobi” meaning “Cool Water”. Nairobi was founded in 1899 as a stop on the Kenya-Uganda railroad, at a time when the country was a British colony.

7. Summer Olympics event : DECATHLON

The decathlon event is a track and field competition, with the name “decathlon” coming from the Greek “deka” (ten) and “athlos” (contest). The ten events in the men’s decathlon are:

  • 100 meters
  • Long jump
  • Shot put
  • High jump
  • 400 meters
  • 110 meters hurdles
  • Discus throw
  • Pole vault
  • Javelin throw
  • 1500 meters

8. Actress Charlotte : RAE

Charlotte Rae is an American actress best known for playing the character Edna Garrett on two sitcoms from the seventies and eighties: “Diff’rent Strokes” and “The Facts of Life”. Towards the end of the series, the Edna Garrett character operated her own gourmet food shop called “Edna’s Edibles”.

9. “Happy Days” mom, to Fonzie : MRS C

In the great sitcom “Happy Days”, the Fonz liked to address Richie Cunningham’s mother as “Mrs. C”. In turn, Mrs. Marion Cunningham addressed the Fonz as “Arthur”.

10. Very, in music : ASSAI

The Italian term “assai” translates as “very”, and is used in music with the same meaning.

11. In quantity : GALORE

Our word “galore”, meaning “in great numbers”, comes from the Irish phrase “go leór” that translates as “sufficiently, enough”.

12. Id controller : EGO

Sigmund Freud created a structural model of the human psyche, breaking it into three parts: the id, the ego, and the superego. The id is that part of the psyche containing the basic instinctual drives. The ego seeks to please the id by causing realistic behavior that benefits the individual. The super-ego almost has a parental role, contradicting the id by introducing critical thinking and morals to behavioral choices.

13. The first Mrs. de Winter, in fiction : REBECCA

Daphne du Maurier’s wonderful novel “Rebecca” was published in 1938. The title refers to the first wife of the main male character Maxim de Winter, who is now a widower. The main female character in the novel is a woman who Maxim meets in Monte Carlo, briefly courts, marries and brings back to his estate in Cornwall, England named Manderley.

15. 10th-century emperor : OTTO I

Otto I the Great, ruled the Holy Roman Empire in the 10th century.

19. Breton or Gael : CELT

The Celts were a very broad group of people across Europe, linked by common languages. The Celts were largely absorbed by other cultures, although a relatively modern revival of the “Celtic identity” is alive and well in the British Isles. Such Celtic peoples today are mainly found in Ireland, Scotland, Wales and Brittany in France..

23. Chocolate trees : CACAOS

Chocolate is made from the seeds of the Theobroma cacao tree. The seeds are very bitter and the traditional drink made with the seed was called “xocolatl” by the Aztecs, meaning “bitter water”. That’s how our “chocolate” got its name.

30. Sch. in Knoxville : UTENN

The University of Tennessee (UT, UTenn) is a public school in Knoxville that was founded in 1794. UT is home to the collections of three sets of presidential papers; those of Presidents Andrew Jackson, James K. Polk and Andrew Johnson, all of whom hailed from Tennessee. UT has three primary campuses, in Knoxville, Chattanooga and Martin.

33. Penn, e.g.: Abbr. : STA

Penn Station in New York City may have been the first Pennsylvania Station, but it’s not the only one. The Pennsylvania Railroad gave that name to many of its big passenger terminals, including one in Philadelphia (now called 30th Street Station), one in Baltimore, one in Pittsburgh, one in Cleveland, as well as others.

38. Crete’s highest elev. : MT IDA

There are two peaks called Mount Ida that are sacred according to Greek mythology. Mount Ida in Crete is the island’s highest point, and is where one can find the cave in which Zeus was reared. Mount Ida in Asia Minor (located in modern-day Turkey) is where Ganymede was swept up by Zeus in the form of an eagle that took him to Olympus where he served as cupbearer to the gods.

40. Hula hoops, say : FAD

Hula hoops were a big craze in the 1950s, but they have been around in various forms at least since the year 500 BCE!

44. Honor society letter : PHI

Phi Beta Kappa was the first collegiate Greek fraternity in the US, founded in 1776 at the College of William and Mary. The organization served as a model for future collegiate fraternities and sororities, although in the 19th century Phi Beta Kappa distanced itself from the fraternal focus and transformed into the honor society that it is today, recognizing academic excellence. The initials Phi Beta Kappa stand for “philosophia biou kybernētēs”, which translates into “philosophy is the guide of life”. The symbol of the Phi Beta Kappa Society is a golden key.

45. “Turn the Page” rocker : SEGER

Bob Seger struggled as a performing artist right through the sixties and early seventies before becoming a commercial success in 1976 with the release of his album “Night Moves”. Since then, Seger has recorded songs that have become classics like “We’ve Got Tonight” and “Old Time Rock & Roll”.

47. Hajji’s destination : MECCA

A Haji (also “Hajji”) is the term used for someone who has made a pilgrimage to Mecca, and it is sometimes also used as a form of address for such a person. The journey itself goes by the name “haj”, “hajj” or “hadj”.

49. Kenton and Getz : STANS

Stan Kenton was a pianist, composer and jazz orchestra leader from Wichita, Kansas. Kenton’s style of music was called “the Wall of Sound”, and that was back in the 1940s. Phil Spector used the same phrase decades later, in the early sixties.

Stan Getz was a jazz saxophonist. Getz’s playing style earned him the nickname “The Sound”.

53. Cubs’ all-time home run champ : SOSA

Sammy Sosa was firmly in the public eye in 1998 when he and Mark McGwire were vying to be the first to surpass the home run record held by Roger Maris. McGwire fell out of public favor due to stories of steroid abuse (stories which he later admitted were true) while Sosa fell out of favor when he was found to be using a corked bat in a 2003 game.

56. Burglar’s challenge : SAFE

The crime of burglary is the breaking into and entering of a building with the intent to steal. The actual theft itself is a separate crime.

58. Exxon, formerly : ESSO

The brand name Esso has its roots in the old Standard Oil company as it uses the initial letters of “Standard” and “Oil” (ESS-O). The Esso brand was replaced by Exxon in the US, but ESSO is still used in many other countries.

The Exxon Corporation was a descendant of John D. Rockefeller’s Standard Oil Company. Exxon merged with Mobil (yet another descendant of Standard Oil) in 1999 to form ExxonMobil.

60. “Diana” singer : ANKA

Canadian-born Paul Anka’s big hit was in 1957, the song entitled “Diana”. Anka was the subject of a much-lauded documentary film in 1962 called “Lonely Boy”.

65. Powerful engine : V-TEN

The engine known as a V10 is configured with two rows of five cylinders mounted on a crankcase. The rows of cylinders are offset from each other around the crankshaft at right angles, or perhaps a little less. This arrangement of ten cylinders in a V-shape gives rise to the name “V10”.

67. Man, but not woman : ISLE

The Isle of Man is a large island located in the middle of the Irish Sea between Great Britain and Ireland. I used to spend a lot of time there in my youth, and a very interesting place it is indeed. The Isle of Man is classed as a British Crown Dependency and isn’t part of the United Kingdom at all. It is self-governing and has its own parliament called the Tynwald. The Tynwald was created in AD 979 and is arguably the oldest continuously-running parliament in the world. The inhabitants of the island speak English, although they do have their own language as well called Manx, which is very similar to Irish Gaeilge and Scottish Gaelic. And then there are those Manx cats, the ones without any tails. I’ve seen lots of them, and can attest that they are indeed found all over the island.

70. Spock portrayer : NIMOY

Leonard Nimoy played the logical Mr. Spock in the original “Star Trek” television series. Spock has to be the most popular character on the show, and he kept popping up in “Star Trek” spin offs. Nimoy first worked alongside William Shatner (Captain Kirk) in an episode of “The Man from U.N.C.L.E.” (I loved that show!), with Nimoy playing a bad guy and Shatner playing an U.N.C.L.E. recruit.

72. Forensic detectives, for short : CSIS

Crime scene investigator (CSI)

Something described as forensic is connected with a court of law, or with public discussion or debate. The term comes from the Latin “forensis” meaning “of a forum, of a place of assembly”. We mainly use the word today to mean “pertaining to legal trials” as in “forensic medicine” and “forensic science”.

75. Chintzy : CHEAP

Chintz is a calico fabric that is very florid, and which originated in India. Indian chintz was in such great demand in Europe in the 17th-century, and so much was sold, that both England and France banned its import. This contributed to the term “chintz” being applied derogatively to a fabric, and from there to anything cheap or gaudy.

78. Like Willie Nelson vocals : NASAL

Country singer, actor and activist Willie Nelson was born during the Great Depression in Abbott, Texas. He wrote his first song at the age of seven and joined his first band at the age of ten, and he is still going strong. Nelson has a ranch in Texas but now spends most of his time in Maui, where he lives in a largely self-sustaining community alongside neighbors such as Kris Kristofferson, Woody Harrelson and Owen Wilson.

82. Indian title : SAHIB

“Sahib” is most recognized as a term of address used in India, where it is used in much the same way as we use “mister” in English. The term was also used to address male Europeans in the days of the British Raj. The correct female form of address is “sahiba”, but in the colonial days the address used was “memsahib”, a melding of “ma’am” and “sahib”

84. Michael Jackson compilation album : KING OF POP

“King of Pop” is a 2008 compilation album that was released to commemorate the 50th birthday of Michael Jackson. A comparison of copies of the album purchased from around the globe show a varying track listing. That’s because the track lists were tailored to each country based on votes submitted by fans.

85. Many OCS grads : LTS

Officer Candidate School (OCS)

88. Discount abbr. : IRR

Irregular (“irr.” or “irreg.”)

89. Some “X-Files” characters : ETS

“The X-Files” is a very successful science fiction show that aired on the Fox network from 1993 to 2002. The stars of the show are David Duchovny (playing Fox Mulder) and the very talented Gillian Anderson (playing Dana Scully). By the time the series ended, “The X-Files” was the longest running sci-fi show in US broadcast history. An “X-Files” reboot started airing in 2016 with Duchovny and Anderson reprising their starring roles.

91. Fancy threads : GLAD RAGS

“Glad rags” is a slang term for one’s best clothes.

92. Oscar winner Berry : HALLE

The actress Halle Berry was the first African American woman to win a Best Actress Oscar, which she received for her performance in the 2001 movie “Monster’s Ball”. Berry also won a Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Actress in 2005 for playing the title role in “Catwoman”, and she very graciously accepted that award in person. Good for her!

99. Iditarod team member : SLED DOG

The Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race covers an incredible 1,161 miles, from Anchorage to Nome in Alaska. The race starts every year on the first Saturday in March, with the first race having been held in 1973. The fastest finishing time was set in 2002 at just under 9 days. The first few races only used a northern route, but then a southern route was added to the roster every second year. It’s kind of a good thing, because when the racers take the northern route they don’t even pass through the town of Iditarod!

101. Winter Games org. : IOC

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) was founded in 1894, and has its headquarters in Lausanne, Switzerland.

104. Whence Aslan : NARNIA

Apparently it’s not certain how C. S. Lewis came to choose Narnia as the name of the fantasy world featured in his series of children’s books, including “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe”. There was an ancient city in Umbria that the Romans called Narnia, but there is no evidence of a link.

In the C. S. Lewis series of books known as “The Chronicles of Narnia”, Aslan is the name of the lion character (as in the title “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe”). “Aslan” is actually the Turkish word for lion. Anyone who has read the books will recognize the the remarkable similarity between the story of Aslan and the story of Christ, including a sacrifice and resurrection.

109. Taboos : NO-NOS

The word “taboo” was introduced into English by Captain Cook in his book “A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean”. Cook described “tabu” (likely imitative of a Tongan word that he had heard) as something that was both consecrated and forbidden.

110. NFL commissioner Goodell : ROGER

Roger Goodell became Commissioner of the NFL in 2006. Goodell is married to Jane Skinner, a former daytime news anchor with Fox News.

112. Flanders Fields flower : POPPY

The WWI battlefields in West Flanders, East Flanders (both in Belgium) and French Flanders are often referred to in English as “Flanders Fields”. The phrase was coined by Canadian physician Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae in his 1915 poem “In Flanders Fields”.

113. Beethoven’s fifths? : SOLS

The solfa syllables are: do, re, mi, fa, sol, la & ti.

Ludwig van Beethoven is my favorite composer from the Classical period. There are two excellent films that showcase his music and give fictionalized yet entertaining accounts of different aspects of his life: “Immortal Beloved” (1994) that speculates on the identity of one of Beethoven’s lovers, and “Copying Beethoven” (2006) that explores the events leading up to the triumphant premiere of his 9th Symphony.

115. Naproxen brand : ALEVE

Aleve is a brand name used for the anti-inflammatory drug Naproxen sodium.

116. Ford finned flop : EDSEL

The Edsel brand of automobile was named for Edsel Ford, son of Henry. Sadly, the name “Edsel” has become synonymous with “failure”, which was no fault of Edsel himself who had died several years before the Edsel line was introduced. When the Ford Motor Company introduced the Edsel on 4 September 1957, Ford proclaimed the day to be “E Day”.

119. In __: existing : ESSE

The Latin term “in esse” is used to mean “actually existing”, and translates as “in being”.

124. Barbary beast : APE

The Barbary macaque is also known as the Barbary ape. The Barbary macaque is native to parts of North Africa, although there is famous population that lives in Gibraltar. The Barbary macaques of Gibraltar are the only wild apes or monkeys found in Europe.

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Join the cast of : ACT IN
6. Apt. listing unit : BDRM
10. Golden __ : AGER
14. Biblical verb : DOST
18. Bara of the silents : THEDA
19. Exonerate : CLEAR
20. Judicious : SAGE
21. Sundance’s sweetie __ Place : ETTA
22. “… you’ve repaired planes for civilian pilots, but can you __?” : SERVICE ACES
24. One guilty of disorderly conduct? : SLOB
25. Slightly : A TAD
26. Quasimodo’s love : ESMERALDA
27. Trendy greeting : CIAO
29. “The Optimist’s Daughter” Pulitzer winner Welty : EUDORA
31. Biblical beast : ASS
32. Some Miles Davis groups : OCTETS
34. “… you’ve made indie films, but can you __?” : DIRECT HITS
36. Govt. loan agency : SBA
37. Web page standard : HTML
39. Game show host : EMCEE
40. “… you’ve made decorative bowls, but can you __?” : FASHION PLATES
46. Lightweight hats : PANAMAS
50. It may be restricted : AREA
51. Artsy Manhattan neighborhood : SOHO
52. Latin clarifier : ID EST
54. Desert trial : N-TEST
55. Derring-do, e.g. : DEEDS
57. Disciplined, in a way : FINED
59. Many a Prado painting : GOYA
61. Windy City rail initials : CTA
62. Longtime Pro Bowl site : OAHU
64. Closer’s stat : SAVES
66. B vitamin used to treat high cholesterol : NIACIN
69. “… you’ve conned small-time dealers with your forgeries, but can you __?” : SNOW FENCES
74. “… you’ve monitored planets with your telescope, but can you __?” : TRACK STARS
76. Sparkly strands : TINSEL
77. Rhone tributary : SAONE
79. Standstill : HALT
80. Theater chain letters : AMC
81. “__ bigger than a breadbox?” : IS IT
83. Sprain site : ANKLE
86. Like some coincidences : EERIE
90. Fairway adjoiner : ROUGH
93. Nike competitor : ASICS
95. Lang. of Livorno : ITAL
97. Kind : SORT
98. Cilium, to the layperson : EYELASH
100. “… you’ve coached gymnasts, but can you __?” : TRAIN SPOTTERS
103. Tuckered out : ALL IN
105. Like falling off __ : A LOG
106. Frat letters : NUS
107. “… you’ve run dining rooms, but can you __?” : HANDLE BARS
111. Thickets : COPSES
114. Actor Daniel __ Kim : DAE
117. Was crazy about : ADORED
118. Greeted the judge : ROSE
120. Prospector’s disappointment : FOOL’S GOLD
122. Actress Delany : DANA
123. “Oh, nuts!” : DANG!
125. “… you’ve written non-theatrical prose, but can you __?” : SUPPLY LINES
127. Spellbound : AGOG
128. Early role for Ronny : OPIE
129. Takes the Black Friday plunge : SHOPS
130. Sorbonne enrollee : ELEVE
131. Melanie’s “Working Girl” role : TESS
132. Drive, for one : GEAR
133. Catch a glimpse of : ESPY
134. Pittsburgh product : STEEL

Down

1. Between ports : AT SEA
2. Fischer’s forte : CHESS
3. Contract conditions : TERMS
4. “If only __ known … ” : I’D’VE
5. African capital on its own river : NAIROBI
6. Ice skate part : BLADE
7. Summer Olympics event : DECATHLON
8. Actress Charlotte : RAE
9. “Happy Days” mom, to Fonzie : MRS C
10. Very, in music : ASSAI
11. In quantity : GALORE
12. Id controller : EGO
13. The first Mrs. de Winter, in fiction : REBECCA
14. Tie : DEAD HEAT
15. 10th-century emperor : OTTO I
16. Get cracking : START
17. “Yay me!” shouts : TA-DAS
19. Breton or Gael : CELT
23. Chocolate trees : CACAOS
28. Was in a jam? : IDLED
30. Sch. in Knoxville : UTENN
33. Penn, e.g.: Abbr. : STA
35. Insincere, as a promise : EMPTY
36. Sunny-day shapes : SHADOWS
38. Crete’s highest elev. : MT IDA
40. Hula hoops, say : FAD
41. “__ we good?” : ARE
42. Spot : SEE
43. Party-pooperish : NO FUN
44. Honor society letter : PHI
45. “Turn the Page” rocker : SEGER
47. Hajji’s destination : MECCA
48. Up and at ’em : ASTIR
49. Kenton and Getz : STANS
53. Cubs’ all-time home run champ : SOSA
56. Burglar’s challenge : SAFE
58. Exxon, formerly : ESSO
60. “Diana” singer : ANKA
63. Prefix with port : HELI-
65. Powerful engine : V-TEN
67. Man, but not woman : ISLE
68. Swears to : ATTESTS
69. Rubberneck : STARE
70. Spock portrayer : NIMOY
71. Well-timed : ON CUE
72. Forensic detectives, for short : CSIS
73. Take the loss : EAT IT
75. Chintzy : CHEAP
78. Like Willie Nelson vocals : NASAL
82. Indian title : SAHIB
84. Michael Jackson compilation album : KING OF POP
85. Many OCS grads : LTS
87. Salmon-to-be : ROE
88. Discount abbr. : IRR
89. Some “X-Files” characters : ETS
91. Fancy threads : GLAD RAGS
92. Oscar winner Berry : HALLE
94. Unrefined : CRASS
96. Remote : LONELY
99. Iditarod team member : SLED DOG
101. Winter Games org. : IOC
102. Grapples : TUSSLES
104. Whence Aslan : NARNIA
107. Went after : HAD AT
108. Saw : ADAGE
109. Taboos : NO-NOS
110. NFL commissioner Goodell : ROGER
112. Flanders Fields flower : POPPY
113. Beethoven’s fifths? : SOLS
114. Beneficiary : DONEE
115. Naproxen brand : ALEVE
116. Ford finned flop : EDSEL
119. In __: existing : ESSE
121. Snazzy coating : GILT
124. Barbary beast : APE
126. Hesitant speaker’s sounds : UHS

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6 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 7 Jan 2018, Sunday”

    1. @Lulu –
      I had the same thought while solving. But apparently “derring-do” can refer to a single act or a body of work – e.g. The policeman had a long record of derring-do (i.e brave DEEDS) so he was promoted to sheriff. I guess the usage here is correct.

      Best –

  1. AF’d…almost finished. Not sure of the time as I did it in two parts. Finally had to cheat a little in 2 different spots.

    Tough one

    Best –

  2. Hi all! ?
    Not a bad Sunday — finíshed error-free. More surprising that I finished than that I had no errors—tho there were some sticking points. For some reason I wrote in TRAINSPOTTING, which of course didn’t work for the clue OR the grid. !! ?
    RE derring-do — Jeff, looks like you have it, but *I* was MUCH more bothered by I’D’VE!!!! Bad usage! ? If not contracted, the clause would read “If only I would have known…” !! Wrong! The correct form of course is “If only I had known…”
    No “would” in the if-clause! “If I had arrived on time, I would have seen the previews.”
    Some grammarians will say that using “would” in the if-clause is acceptable in very casual speech — but that doesn’t make it correct here!! ❌!!
    …. I guess I really do need to find some more English students to tutor…
    Be well~~™?

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