LA Times Crossword Answers 25 Feb 2018, Sunday

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Constructed by: Jeffrey Wechsler
Edited by: Rich Norris

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Today’s Theme: Kinda Sorta

Themed answers are common phrases with the letter sequence “ISH” inserted:

  • 23A. Snow in southwest England? : CORNISH FLAKES (from “corn flakes”)
  • 36A. Golf-loving priest’s dream? : PARISH FOR THE COURSE (from “par for the course”)
  • 48A. Pastry with a metallic taste? : STEELY DANISH (from “Steely Dan”)
  • 66A. Result of certain radar screens conking out? : WEATHER VANISHES (from “weather vanes”)
  • 86A. Media outlet in Pennsylvania Dutch country? : AMISH FM RADIO (from “AM/FM radio”)
  • 94A. General-use gesture? : ALL-PURPOSE FLOURISH (from “all-purpose flour”)
  • 112A. Cause of an origami flaw? : FOLDING MISHAP (from “folding map”)

Bill’s time: 15m 57s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. JFK’s 109 : PT BOAT

PT boats were motor torpedo boats: small speedy vessels that used torpedoes as their primary weapon against large surface ships. The “PT” stands for “Patrol Torpedo”. The most famous PT boats that served during WWII were probably PT-41 that carried General Douglas MacArthur and his family from Corregidor to Mindanao in his escape from the Philippines, and PT-109 that was commanded by Lieutenant John F. Kennedy, future President of the United States.

12. Egg white protein : ALBUMIN

Albumin is a water-soluble protein found in egg whites. Albumins are also found in blood plasma.

19. Ronzoni rival : BARILLA

Barilla is a supplier of Italian foods that is headquartered in Parma, Italy. It was founded as a bakery shop in Parma back in 1877, and now supplies almost 50% of the pasta sold in Italy, and about 15% of pasta sold in the US.
Ronzoni is a brand owned by New World Pasta, which is the largest supplier of pasta to the retail North American market.

20. Open, as an aspirin bottle : UNCAP

Aspirin used to be a brand name for the drug acetylsalicylic acid. Aspirin was introduced by the German drug company Bayer AG in the late 1800s. As part of the war reparations paid by Germany after WWI, Bayer AG lost the use of the trademark “Aspirin” (as well as the trademark Heroin!) and it became a generic term.

21. Quarters and halves : COINAGE

The American quarter is a little unusual in the world of decimal currency, if you think about it. Most currencies have a “20-cent” coin, which is easier to work with mathematically. The US went for the quarter in deference to the practice of dividing Spanish Milled Dollars into eight wedge-shaped “bits”. That’s also why the quarter is sometimes referred to as “two bits”. State quarters were introduced in 1999, but prior to that the quarter had an eagle on its reverse.
The half dollar is the largest US coin in circulation, although you don’t see them very often these days, outside of the gambling community. The current design is known as the Kennedy half dollar.
The Kennedy half dollar is a 50-cent coin that was first issued in 1964 as a memorial to President John F. Kennedy, who had been assassinated the year before. Even though a lot of the coins were minted, and still are, there are rarely seen in circulation. The first minting disappeared almost immediately as collectors and regular individuals put the coins away as a memento or an investment.

22. It’s often written in stone : EPITAPH

Our word “epitaph” ultimately comes from the Greek “epitaphion”, which translates as “funeral oration”.

23. Snow in southwest England? : CORNISH FLAKES (from “corn flakes”)

Cornwall is a county in the very southwest of England. Cornwall is the homeland of the Cornish people, a Celtic nation who have a very distinct cultural identity. The Cornish language is in the same Celtic language family as Welsh and Breton.

28. Salad bar container : CRUET

A cruet is a small glass bottle that holds a condiment or perhaps a dressing. The word “cruet” comes from the Old French word for an earthen pot.

29. EKGs may be done in them : ERS

An EKG measures electrical activity in the heart. Back in my homeland of Ireland, an EKG is known as an ECG (for electrocardiogram). We use the German name in the US, Elektrokardiogramm, giving us EKG. Apparently the abbreviation EKG is preferred as ECG might be confused (if poorly handwritten, I guess) with EEG, the abbreviation for an electroencephalogram.

33. Waikiki wreaths : LEIS

Waikiki is a neighborhood of Honolulu, and home to the famous Waikiki Beach. The name “Waikiki” means “spouting fresh water” in Hawaiian.

34. Rte. finder : GPS

Global positioning system (GPS)

43. Cal. locale of the Latino Walk of Fame : EAST LA

The Latino Walk of Fame is located on Whittier Boulevard in East Los Angeles. Modeled on Hollywood’s famous Walk of Fame, the Latino Walk of Fame was inaugurated in 1997 with the mission of honoring Latino celebrities. Each name is engraved in a Sun Plaque.

48. Pastry with a metallic taste? : STEELY DANISH (from “Steely Dan”)

The Danish pastry that we know so well over here in the US is indeed a Danish specialty, although the recipe was brought to Denmark by Austrian bakers. A “Danish” is called “Viennese bread” in Denmark.
Steely Dan’s heyday was in the seventies when they toured for a couple of years, although the group mainly focused on studio work. The band was formed in 1972 and broke up in 1981. The core of the band reunited in 1993, and is still performing today despite the passing of founding member Walter Becker in 2017. Steely Dan’s best-selling album is “Aja” (pronounced “Asia”), which was released in 1977.

53. Boodles, for one : GIN

Boodles British Gin was introduced in 1845, and was named for the Boodle’s gentlemen’s club in London. Winston Churchill was a member of the club, and Boodles was purportedly his favorite brand.

54. Renaissance painter della Francesca : PIERO

Piero della Francesca was an Early Renaissance painter and mathematician from modern-day Tuscany in Italy.

55. Auto body problem : RUST

Rust is iron oxide. Rust forms when iron oxidizes, reacts with oxygen.

56. Eye layer : UVEA

The uvea is the middle of the three layers that make up the eyeball. The outer layer is called the fibrous tunic, and the inner layer is the retina.

61. Start of many a riddle : WHAT …

Here are a few riddles:

  1. Imagine you are in a dark room. How do you get out?
  2. What can travel around the world while staying in a corner?
  3. There is a word and six letters it contains. Take one away and twelve is what remains. What word is it?
  4. Two girls were born to the same mother, on the same day, at the same time, in the same month and year and yet they’re not twins. How can this be?
  5. What is so delicate that even saying its name will break it?
  6. What word in the English Language is always spelled incorrectly?

And the answers:

  1. Stop imagining.
  2. A stamp
  3. Dozens
  4. They’re in a set of triplets
  5. Silence
  6. Incorrectly

63. Ben Gurion carrier : EL AL

Ben Gurion International (TLV) is Israel’s main airport, and is located in the city of Lod just a few miles southeast of Tel Aviv. The airport is named for David Ben-Gurion, Israel’s first prime minister.

70. Ski resort aids : T-BARS

A T-bar is a ski lift on which the skiers are pulled up the hill in pairs, with each pair standing (not sitting!) either side of a T-shaped metal bar. The bar is placed behind the thighs, pulling along the skiers as they remain standing on their skis (hopefully!). There’s also a J-bar, a similar device, but with each J-shaped bar used by one skier at a time.

72. Mishmash : OLIO

“Olio” is a term meaning a hodgepodge or a mixture, coming from the mixed stew of the same name. The stew in turn takes its name from the Spanish “olla”, the clay pot used for cooking.

73. “M*A*S*H” roller : JEEP

The Jeep is the original off-road vehicle. It was developed by the American Bantam Car Company in 1940 at the request of the US government who recognized the upcoming need for the armed forces as American involvement in WWII loomed. The Bantam Company was too small to cope with demand, so the government gave the designs to competing car companies. The design and brand eventually ended up with AMC in the seventies and eighties.

74. Dec. setting in Denver : MST

Mountain Standard Time (MST)

78. Rum and water drink : GROG

Edward Vernon was a naval officer with the nickname “Old Grog”. In 1740, Vernon ordered that the daily ration of rum for his sailors should be watered down, in order to reduce discipline problems caused by drunkenness. The diluted rum was sweetened with sugar, and lemon or lime added to help preserve it on long voyages. This recipe, found to reduce scurvy among sailors (because of the citrus) spread throughout the Royal Navy, and “grog” was born. As an aside, George Washington’s older half-brother named the famous Washington Mount Vernon Plantation in honor of Edward Vernon.

83. CPR provider : EMT

An emergency medical technician (EMT) might administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

84. Brazilian map word : SAO

In Portuguese, the word “são” can mean “saint”, as in São Paulo (Saint Paul) and São José (Saint John). If the saint’s name starts with a letter H or with a vowel, then the word “santo” is used instead, as in Santo Agostinho (Saint Augustine) and Santo Antônio (Saint Anthony).

86. Media outlet in Pennsylvania Dutch country? : AMISH FM RADIO (from “AM/FM radio”)

The Amish are a group of Christian churches, a subgroup of the Mennonite churches. The Amish church originated in Switzerland and Alsace in 1693 when it was founded by Jakob Ammann. It was Ammann who gave the name to the Amish people. Many Amish people came to Pennsylvania in the 18th century.

89. ’90s golf club-making innovation : TITANIUM

The chemical element called titanium is a silver-colored metal. Discovered in 1791 by British clergyman and mineralogist William Gregor, the element is named for the Titans of Greek mythology. Titanium has the highest tensile strength to density ratio of any metallic element, so it is strong and yet relatively light. As a result, titanium and titanium alloys are used extensively in aircraft and spacecraft.

99. Source of brain research data: Abbr. : EEG

An electroencephalogram (EEG) is a record of electrical activity caused by the firing of neurons within the brain. The EEG might be used to diagnose epilepsy, or perhaps to determine if a patient is “brain dead”.

105. The Jungfrau, e.g. : ALP

The Jungfrau is a peak in the Bernese Alps in Switzerland. “Jungfrau” translates from German as “maiden” or “virgin”.

111. Binary code basic : ONE

Our base-10 numeral system is also known as the decimal (sometimes “denary”) numeral system. Another common numeral system is base-2, which is also known as the binary system.

112. Cause of an origami flaw? : FOLDING MISHAP (from “folding map”)

Origami is the traditional Japanese art form of paper folding. The best-known example of the craft is the paper crane. The word “origami” is derived from “ori“ (folding) and “kami” (paper).

123. Old lab heaters : ETNAS

The Bunsen burner is common piece of lab equipment that is used for heating and combustion. The device was invented in 1854 by Robert Bunsen at the University of Heidelberg in Germany. It is sometimes referred to as an “etna”, named for the volcano.

Down

1. Like decrees from Francis : PAPAL

Pope Francis was elected on 13 March 2013 as the 266th Bishop of Rome and leader of the Roman Catholic church. The new pope is famously taking a much simpler and more modest approach to the office, as he did with his life back in Argentina. Francis is the first pope since 1903 not to reside in the papal residence, choosing to live instead in the less lavish Vatican guesthouse.

3. It might come from the horse’s mouth : BIT

The type of horse tack known as a bit is placed in a horse’s mouth and is used to aid communication of instruction from rider to mount. The bit is held in place by means of a bridle around the head, and is controlled by the rider using the attached reins.

5. Nuclear decay emission : ALPHA RAY

There are many types of radiation. Alpha rays are streams of alpha particles, which are basically helium nuclei, i.e. two protons and two neutrons bound together. Alpha particles are emitted by many different types of radioactive elements in the process known as alpha decay.

6. Sesame seed paste : TAHINI

“Tahini” is the Arabic name for the paste made from ground sesame seeds. Tahini is a major ingredient in hummus, one of my favorite dishes.

7. Rudolph’s dad, e.g. : BUCK

We get the names for Santa’s reindeer from the famous 1823 poem called “A Visit from St. Nicholas”, although we’ve modified a couple of the names over the years. The full list is:

  • Dasher
  • Dancer
  • Prancer
  • Vixen
  • Comet
  • Cupid
  • Donder (originally “Dunder”, and now often “Donner”)
  • Blitzen (originally “Blixem”)

Rudolph was added to the list by retailer Montgomery Ward, would you believe? The store commissioned Robert L. May to create a booklet that could be handed out to children around Christmas in 1939, and May introduced us to a new friend for Santa, namely Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer.

8. Baseball Hall of Famer Slaughter : ENOS

Enos Slaughter has a remarkable playing record in Major League Baseball over a 19-year career. Slaughter’s record is particularly remarkable given that he left baseball for three years to serve in the military during WWII.

9. ATM maker : NCR

NCR is an American company that has been in business since 1884, and was originally called the National Cash Register Company. The company has done well in a market where new technologies seem to be constantly disrupting the status quo.

11. Scrooge visitor : SPIRIT

The classic 1843 novella “A Christmas Carol” by Charles Dickens has left us with a few famous phrases and words. Firstly, it led to popular use of the phrase “Merry Christmas”, and secondly it gave us the word “scrooge” meaning a miserly person. And thirdly, everyone knows that Ebenezer Scrooge uttered the words “Bah! Humbug!”.

12. Flu symptom : ACHE

Influenza (flu) is an ailment that is caused by a virus. The virus is readily inactivated by the use of soap, so washing hands and surfaces is especially helpful in containing flu outbreaks.

14. Fed. budget unit : BIL

Billion (bil.)

15. Merkel of “Destry Rides Again” : UNA

Una Merkel was an actress whose career spanned the silent and “talkies” eras. She mainly played supporting roles, or was the leading lady to comedians like Jack Benny and Harold Lloyd who were given starring roles in movies.
“Destry” is a western film released in 1954 starring Audie Murphy in the title role. “Destry” is an adaptation of a Max Brand novel “Destry Rides Again”. The same novel was also used as the inspiration for a 1939 film “Destry Rides Again” starring James Stewart opposite Marlene Dietrich.

17. Eisner’s successor at Disney : IGER

Robert Iger took over from Michael Eisner as CEO in 2005. Iger worked for ABC when it was taken over by Disney in 1996, and in 1999 he was named president of Walt Disney International. Iger is doing okay for himself; he earned more than $29 million in 2009.

18. Fabled loch : NESS

The Loch Ness monster has been talked about for centuries, but modern interest started in 1933 when a spate of sightings was reported. Those sightings don’t seem to have stopped, with photographs really sparking the imagination.

19. Attraction for a cartoon coyote : BEEP

Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner are two much-loved cartoon characters from Warner Bros. Wile E. Coyote was created first, and Road Runner was invented as someone for Wile E. to play off. I love this cartoon; definitely one of the best …

24. Dish using seaweed : SUSHI

Sushi is a Japanese dish that has as its primary ingredient cooked, vinegared rice. The rice is usually topped with something, most often fish, and can be served in seaweed rolls. If we want raw fish by itself, then we have to order “sashimi”.

35. Stout server : PUB

The term “stout” was first used for a type of beer in the 1600s when was used to describe a “strong, stout” brew, and not necessarily a dark beer as it is today.

37. Pediatrician Asperger : HANS

Hans Asperger was a pediatrician and medical professor from Austria. Dr. Asperger achieved renown for his studies of mental disorders in children, but only after his death in 1980. In the eighties, there was renewed interest in his work, and Asperger Syndrome was named after him.

39. Poet Lazarus : EMMA

Emma Lazarus was a poet from New York City who is best known as the author of an 1883 sonnet “The New Colossus”. “The New Colossus” sits on a bronze plaque inside the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty, a fitting location given that the title refers to Lady Liberty.

Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,
With conquering limbs astride from land to land;
Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand
A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame
Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name
Mother of Exiles. From her beacon-hand
Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command
The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame.
Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp! cries she
With silent lips. “Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!”

40. Entertainer of the Year org. : CMA

Country Music Association (CMA)

42. Child’s counting word : EENY

Eeny, meeny, miny, moe,
Catch the tiger/monkey/baby by the toe.
If it hollers/screams let him go,
Eeny, meeny, miny, moe, you are it!

50. Name on a spine : AUTHOR

In the US, the convention is to write the title on the spine of a book from top-to-bottom. In most of Europe, the convention is to write the title from bottom-to-top. We have a lot of books in the “library” in our house from both sides of the Atlantic, and so there is much moving of the head from left to right as we glance along our bookshelves.

51. With 10-Down, Waikiki entertainer : HULA …
(10D. See 51-Down : … DANCER)

The hula is a native dance of Hawaii that uses arm movements to relate a story. The hula can be performed while sitting (a noho dance) or while standing (a luna dance).

57. Mayflower roller : VAN

Mayflower Transit is a moving and storage company that was founded in 1927 in Indianapolis, but is now based in Fenton, Missouri.

58. Prophet associated with Passover : ELIJAH

Elijah was a prophet in the northern kingdom of Israel according to the Books of Kings in the Hebrew Bible and the Qur’an. The name “Elijah” translates from Hebrew as “My God is Yahweh”. Elijah is also known Elias.

59. Western alliance: Abbr. : OAS

The Organization of American States (OAS) has its headquarters in Washington, D.C. Not all of the independent states in the Americas are members. Cuba was barred from participation in the organization after a vote in 196. Honduras had her membership suspended after the country’s 2009 coup.

63. Bolivian president Morales : EVO

Evo Morales has been President of Bolivia since 2006. Morales has a socialist agenda, and as such his government is a close ally to the regimes in Venezuela and in Cuba.

64. Role in “Evita” : CHE

Che is the narrator in the musical “Evita” by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice.

67. Symphonic rock gp. : ELO

The Electric Light Orchestra (ELO) is a symphonic rock group from the north of England.

68. European capital on its own gulf : RIGA

Riga is the capital city of Latvia. The historical center of Riga is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, declared as such because of the city’s magnificent examples of Art Nouveau architecture.

69. Feudal peasant : SERF

A serf was a member of the lowest feudal class, someone attached to land owned by a lord. “Serf” comes from the Latin “servus”, meaning “slave”.

70. Sri Lankan people : TAMIL

Tamils are a large ethnic group of almost 80 million people who speak Tamil as their mother tongue. Despite the large Tamil population, there is no Tamil state. The highest concentration of Tamils is in Sri Lanka, where they make up about 25% of the population.

76. General __ chicken : TSO’S

General Tso’s chicken is an American creation, and a dish often found on the menu of a Chinese restaurant. The name General Tso may be a reference to General Zuo Zongtang of the Qing Dynasty, but there is no clear link.

77. Head of Byzantium? : BETA

Byzantium was a Greek colony that was centered on what was to become Constantinople, and is now Istanbul. Legend suggests that there was a king Byzas, who gave his name to the city and later the Byzantine Empire. The Eastern Roman Empire later became known as the Byzantine Empire, right up until the Middle Ages.

80. European capital : OSLO

The Norwegian capital of Oslo is located at the northern end of a fjord known as Oslofjord. The fjord is home to 40 islands that lie within the city’s limits. Oslo also has 343 lakes.

85. “The __ bites shrewdly; it is very cold”: Hamlet : AIR

The full title of William Shakespeare’s play that we tend to call “Hamlet” is “The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark”. It is the most performed of all Shakespeare’s plays and it is also his longest, the only one of his works comprising over 4,000 lines. That’s about a 4-hour sitting in a theater …

87. Annoy : MIFF

To miff is to put out, to tee off, and is verb that has been around since the early 1600s. Interestingly, in 1824 Sir Walter Scott described the word “miffed” as “a women’s phrase”. That should get him a slap, I’d say …

88. Eponymous apple grower : MCINTOSH

Every McIntosh apple grown today can trace its roots back (pun!) to a tree on a farm near Morrisburg in Ontario, Canada. John McIntosh owned the tree, and he started to cultivate seedlings in 1796.

91. Web surfing tool : MODEM

A modem is a device that is used to facilitate the transmission of a digital signal over an analog line. At one end of the line a modem is used to “modulate” an analog carrier signal to encode the the digital information, and at the other end a modem is used to “demodulate” the analog carrier signal and so reproduce the original digital information. This modulation-demodulation gives the device its name: a MOdulator-DEModulator, or “modem”.

95. North Atlantic navigation worry : SEA ICE

The Arctic Ocean is in the north polar region, and is almost completely covered by sea ice in the winter. I think it’s common knowledge that the amount of sea ice covering the Arctic Ocean during the summer has been dropping in recent times, as a consequence of climate change.

97. “The X-Files” sighting : UFO

“The X-Files” is a very successful science fiction show that aired on the Fox network from 1993 to 2002. The stars of the show are David Duchovny (playing Fox Mulder) and the very talented Gillian Anderson (playing Dana Scully). By the time the series ended, “The X-Files” was the longest running sci-fi show in US broadcast history. An “X-Files” reboot started airing in 2016 with Duchovny and Anderson reprising their starring roles.

102. Vichy verse : POEME

Vichy is a spa town in the center of France. The people from Vichy are known as Vichyssois. After Paris, was occupied by the Germans in WWII, Vichy was chosen as the seat of government for what was called the French State. The Vichy government had theoretical authority even in occupied France, and is remembered for its collaboration with the German authorities. Vichy was chosen as the new seat of government because of its relative proximity to Paris, and simply because the town had the largest hotel room capacity in the “free zone” of the country.

105. Aqua Velva alternative : AFTA

Afta is an aftershave in the Mennen range of products that is owned by Colgate-Palmolive.

106. Movie mogul Marcus : LOEW

Marcus Loew was a New Yorker born into a poor Jewish family. He started out in a penny arcade business and used its profits to buy into a nickelodeon. He built a whole chain of movie theaters, and then moved into the production of films so that he could guarantee supply of features that he could show in his theaters. Eventually he pulled together the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) film production company, and sadly passed away just three years after he inked the deal.

107. Neck, in Nottingham : SNOG

“Snogging” is British slang of unknown origin that dates back to the end of WWII. The term is used for “kissing and cuddling”, what we call “making out” over here in the US.
The term “necking” applies to kissing and caressing. I like what Groucho Marx had to say on the subject:

Whoever named it necking was a poor judge of anatomy.

Nottingham is a city in the East Midlands of England. To us on this side of the Atlantic, perhaps Nottingham is most famous for its links to the legend of Robin Hood.

109. Acapulco abode : CASA

The Mexican city of Acapulco is on the southwest coast of the country, in the state of Guerrero. The name “Acapulco” translates from the local language into “at the big reeds”.

115. Dynasty after the Qin : HAN

The Han Dynasty was the second imperial dynasty of China and lasted from 206 BC to 220 AD. It came after the Qin Dynasty, and before the Three Kingdoms.

117. “Eureka!” : AHA!

“Eureka” translates from Greek as “I have found it”. The word is usually associated with Archimedes, uttered as he stepped into his bath one day. His discovery was that the volume of water that was displaced was equal to that of the object (presumably his foot) that had been submerged. He used this fact to determine the volume of a crown, something he needed in order to determine if it was made of pure gold or was a forgery.

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. JFK’s 109 : PT BOAT
7. Gives in : BENDS
12. Egg white protein : ALBUMIN
19. Ronzoni rival : BARILLA
20. Open, as an aspirin bottle : UNCAP
21. Quarters and halves : COINAGE
22. It’s often written in stone : EPITAPH
23. Snow in southwest England? : CORNISH FLAKES (from “corn flakes”)
25. Snack : EAT
26. Hayseeds : HICKS
28. Salad bar container : CRUET
29. EKGs may be done in them : ERS
30. Nice : PLEASANT
33. Waikiki wreaths : LEIS
34. Rte. finder : GPS
36. Golf-loving priest’s dream? : PARISH FOR THE COURSE (from “par for the course”)
43. Cal. locale of the Latino Walk of Fame : EAST LA
46. Bottom-row key : ALT
47. Fixed : IMMOBILE
48. Pastry with a metallic taste? : STEELY DANISH (from “Steely Dan”)
52. Steamed : MAD
53. Boodles, for one : GIN
54. Renaissance painter della Francesca : PIERO
55. Auto body problem : RUST
56. Eye layer : UVEA
59. “Gracious!” : OH MY!
60. Since Jan. 1, in accounting : YTD
61. Start of many a riddle : WHAT …
63. Ben Gurion carrier : EL AL
64. Freight unit : CRATE
66. Result of certain radar screens conking out? : WEATHER VANISHES (from “weather vanes”)
70. Ski resort aids : T-BARS
72. Mishmash : OLIO
73. “M*A*S*H” roller : JEEP
74. Dec. setting in Denver : MST
77. Lea sounds : BAAS
78. Rum and water drink : GROG
79. Tusker hunted as game : BOAR
81. Hostile calls : HOOTS
83. CPR provider : EMT
84. Brazilian map word : SAO
86. Media outlet in Pennsylvania Dutch country? : AMISH FM RADIO (from “AM/FM radio”)
89. ’90s golf club-making innovation : TITANIUM
92. Coughing, perhaps : ILL
93. Provides fare for : CATERS
94. General-use gesture? : ALL-PURPOSE FLOURISH (from “all-purpose flour”)
99. Source of brain research data: Abbr. : EEG
100. Unresponsive (to) : DEAF
101. Like delicate fabric : FINE-SPUN
105. The Jungfrau, e.g. : ALP
107. Makeup malfunction : SMEAR
109. Take as one’s own : CO-OPT
111. Binary code basic : ONE
112. Cause of an origami flaw? : FOLDING MISHAP (from “folding map”)
116. “Just like us!” : SO ARE WE!
119. Genteel café relative : TEAROOM
120. Conclude : CEASE
121. Feeling guilty : ASHAMED
122. Charming small-town street array : AWNINGS
123. Old lab heaters : ETNAS
124. Became less hostile : THAWED

Down

1. Like decrees from Francis : PAPAL
2. Overused : TRITE
3. It might come from the horse’s mouth : BIT
4. Portuguese hi : OLA
5. Nuclear decay emission : ALPHA RAY
6. Sesame seed paste : TAHINI
7. Rudolph’s dad, e.g. : BUCK
8. Baseball Hall of Famer Slaughter : ENOS
9. ATM maker : NCR
10. See 51-Down : DANCER
11. Scrooge visitor : SPIRIT
12. Flu symptom : ACHE
13. It’s measured in degrees for golf clubs : LOFT
14. Fed. budget unit : BIL
15. Merkel of “Destry Rides Again” : UNA
16. Fixes : MAKES RIGHT
17. Eisner’s successor at Disney : IGER
18. Fabled loch : NESS
19. Attraction for a cartoon coyote : BEEP
24. Dish using seaweed : SUSHI
27. Small change: Abbr. : CTS
31. More to the point : APTER
32. Less healthy-looking : SALLOWER
33. Auction array : LOTS
34. “I approve” : GOOD
35. Stout server : PUB
37. Pediatrician Asperger : HANS
38. Move like a moth : FLIT
39. Poet Lazarus : EMMA
40. Entertainer of the Year org. : CMA
41. Muck : SLIME
42. Child’s counting word : EENY
43. Notice : ESPY
44. Feuding : AT IT
45. Acorn, functionally : SEED
49. “Phooey!” : DRAT!
50. Name on a spine : AUTHOR
51. With 10-Down, Waikiki entertainer : HULA
57. Mayflower roller : VAN
58. Prophet associated with Passover : ELIJAH
59. Western alliance: Abbr. : OAS
62. Is down with : HAS
63. Bolivian president Morales : EVO
64. Role in “Evita” : CHE
65. Put another way : REPHRASE
66. Existed : WAS
67. Symphonic rock gp. : ELO
68. European capital on its own gulf : RIGA
69. Feudal peasant : SERF
70. Sri Lankan people : TAMIL
71. Armed forces strategy : BATTLE PLAN
74. Manner : MODE
75. Commotion : STIR
76. General __ chicken : TSO’S
77. Head of Byzantium? : BETA
78. Rise : GO UP
79. Tell what’s due : BILL
80. European capital : OSLO
82. Court declarations : OATHS
84. Warm and comfy : SNUG
85. “The __ bites shrewdly; it is very cold”: Hamlet : AIR
87. Annoy : MIFF
88. Eponymous apple grower : MCINTOSH
90. Mimic : APE
91. Web surfing tool : MODEM
95. North Atlantic navigation worry : SEA ICE
96. Part of a telemarketer’s gear : EAR SET
97. “The X-Files” sighting : UFO
98. Attacks, as a wrapped gift : RIPS AT
102. Vichy verse : POEME
103. Matchless? : UNWED
104. Requirement : NEED
105. Aqua Velva alternative : AFTA
106. Movie mogul Marcus : LOEW
107. Neck, in Nottingham : SNOG
108. Theaters associated with 106-Down : MGMS
109. Acapulco abode : CASA
110. Unlocks, in verse : OPES
113. Wash’n __ towelettes : DRI
114. Charged thing : ION
115. Dynasty after the Qin : HAN
117. “Eureka!” : AHA!
118. Cold and rainy : RAW

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