LA Times Crossword Answers 4 Apr 2018, Wednesday

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Constructed by: David Poole
Edited by: Rich Norris

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Today’s Reveal Answer: Amen Corner

Themed answers refer to THE MASTERS Tournament of golf, and to AMEN CORNER in particular. Aptly enough, we also have the letters AMEN in each of the four corners of the grid:

  • 21A. Tournament that awards a green jacket : THE MASTERS
  • 37A. Home of 21-Across : AUGUSTA NATIONAL
  • 52A. Exciting section of 37-Across, familiarly … and a configuration found in four apt places in this puzzle : AMEN CORNER

Bill’s time: 5m 47s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Whirlpool brand : AMANA

The Amana Corporation takes its name from the location of its original headquarters, in Middle Amana, Iowa. Today, the Amana name is very much associated with household appliances. The company was founded in 1934 to manufacture commercial walk-in coolers.

Whirlpool is a manufacturer of home appliances that was founded as the Upton Machine Company in 1911. Whirlpool is now the largest manufacturer of home appliances in the world.

6. “M*A*S*H” actor Jamie : FARR

Actor Jamie Farr is best known for playing the cross-dressing Max Klinger in the sitcom ”M*A*S*H”. Although Farr landed a role in the 1955 movie “Blackboard Jungle”, his career didn’t really take off until he started appearing regularly on “The Red Skelton Show”. Years later he managed to get a one-episode appearance in ”M*A*S*H”, and his character and performance were received so well that he became a regular on the show. Farr actually did serve in the US Army in Korea, although it was after hostilities had ended. The dog tags that Farr wore when filming ”M*A*S*H” were the ones that he actually wore while serving in the military.

10. Italian smoker : ETNA

Mount Etna on the island of Sicily is the largest of three active volcanoes in Italy, and indeed the largest of all active volcano in Europe. Etna is about 2 1/2 times the height of its equally famous sister, Mt. Vesuvius. Mt. Etna is home to a 110-km long narrow-gauge railway, and two ski resorts.

14. Saint Kitts neighbor : NEVIS

Nevis is an island in the Caribbean Sea, which along with the island of Saint Kitts makes up the Federation of Saint Kitts and Nevis. At the center of Nevis is a volcano, called Nevis Peak. Apparently the clouds at the top of this peak reminded someone of snow, so the island was given the Spanish name “Nuestra Señora de las Nieves” (Our Lady of the Snows). The name “Nevis” then comes from “nieves”, the word for “snow”.

Saint Kitts is the more familiar name for Saint Christopher Island, part of the West Indies. Saint Kitts, along with the neighboring island of Nevis, is part of the country known as the Federation of Saint Kitts and Nevis. Saint Kitts has had a troubled history, with the Spanish, British and French all vying for control of the island. Most of the population today is descended from slaves brought onto Saint Kitts to farm tobacco and then sugar cane. Most of the slaves were from Africa, although Irish and Scottish slaves were also used.

15. Drink with a polar bear mascot : ICEE

Icee and Slurpee are brand names of slushy drinks. Ugh …

17. Civil rights org. : NAACP

The full name of the NAACP, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, is remarkable in that it actually still uses the offensive term “colored people”. The NAACP was founded in 1909, by a group that included suffragette and journalist Mary White Ovington, wealthy socialist William English Walling, and civil rights activist Henry Moskowitz. Another member of the founding group was W. E. B. Du Bois, the first African-American to earn a doctorate at Harvard University. The date chosen for the founding of the NAACP was February 12th, 1909, the 100th anniversary of the birth of President Abraham Lincoln, the man most visibly associated with the emancipation of African-American slaves.

19. End of a Basque ball game? : … ALAI

Even though jai alai is often said to be the fastest sport in the world because of the speed of the ball, in fact golf balls usually get going at a greater clip. Although, as a blog reader once pointed out to me, you don’t have to catch a golf ball …

Jai alai is a game that derives from Basque pelota, and is known as “cesta-punta” in the Basque language.

20. She walked into Rick’s gin joint : ILSA

The fictional Rick’s Café Américain is the main setting used in the movie “Casablanca”, with the café owner played by Humphrey Bogart. Should you ever visit Morocco, you might try visiting Rick’s Café Casablanca, an establishment opened in 2004 that largely recreates the look and feel of the memorable movie set.

21. Tournament that awards a green jacket : THE MASTERS

Golf’s Masters Tournament is the first of the four major championships in the annual calendar, taking place in the first week of April each year. It is played at Augusta National Golf Club in Georgia, and has a number of traditions. One is that the winner is awarded the famous “green jacket”, but he only gets to keep it for a year and must return it to the club after twelve months.

23. Springsteen’s __ Band : E STREET

The E Street Band is the backing group for Bruce Springsteen. The band came together in 1972 but didn’t take a formal name until two years later. The keyboard player in the original line up was David Sancious, and his mother allowed the group to rehearse at her home. That home was on E Street in Belmar, New Jersey, and that’s where the band got their name.

26. Museum collection : ART

The term “museum” comes from the ancient Greek word “mouseion” that denoted a temple dedicated to the “Muses”. The Muses were the patrons of the arts in Greek mythology.

29. Montreal Canadien, to hockey fans : HAB

The Montreal Canadiens hockey team is known by the nickname “Habs”, which is short for “Les Habitants”. “Les habitants” were the original French settlers in Quebec.

32. Wolfgang Puck restaurant chain : SPAGO

Wolfgang Puck is a celebrity chef from Austria. Puck is the man behind the famous pair of restaurants in Southern California called Spago.

37. Home of 21-Across : AUGUSTA NATIONAL

(21A. Tournament that awards a green jacket : THE MASTERS)
The Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Georgia was founded in 1933 by Bobby Jones and Clifford Roberts. Famously, Augusta hosts the Masters Tournament each year. Augusta is very much a private club, and some of its policies have drawn criticism over the years. Prior to 1959, the club had a bylaw requiring that all caddies be African American. There were no African-American club members admitted until 1990, and no women until 2012.

40. Real estate measure : AREA

The terms “realty” and “real estate” date back to the later 1600s, and are derived from the earlier meaning “real possession”, something one owns that is tangible and real.

42. Colgate rival : CREST

Crest is a Procter and Gamble brand of toothpaste that was introduced in 1953.

43. “Full Frontal” host Samantha : BEE

Samantha Bee is a comedian from Toronto who found fame as a correspondent on “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart” starting way back in 2003. Bee left “The Daily Show” in 2015 to host her own late-night talk show “Full Frontal with Samantha Bee” on TBS.

44. Website with a “Craft Supplies & Tools” section : ETSY

Etsy.com is an e-commerce website where you can buy and sell the kind of items that you might find at a craft fair.

45. Fenway team: Abbr. : BOS

The Fens is a picturesque parkland in Boston. Once a saltwater marshland, urban development since the late 1800s has turned the area into what is essentially a freshwater lagoon. The Fens (sometimes “Back Bay Fens”) gave its name to the Fenway-Kenmore neighborhood, and ultimately to the famous Fenway Park baseball stadium.

48. Actress Redgrave : VANESSA

The English actress Vanessa Redgrave is part of a predominant acting family. Her father was the great Michael Redgrave, and her sister the accomplished Lynn Redgrave. Vanessa’s daughter was Natasha Richardson, the actress and wife of Liam Neeson who died after a skiing accident in 2009.

52. Exciting section of 37-Across, familiarly … and a configuration found in four apt places in this puzzle : AMEN CORNER

One section of the course at Augusta National has been nicknamed as Amen Corner since 1958. It comprises the second shot at the 11th hole, all of the 12th hole, and the first couple of shots at the 13th. The location was given the nickname by sports writer Herbert Warren Wind in a 1958 article in “Sports Illustrated”. Wind “lifted” the name from a jazz tune called “Shouting in that Amen Corner”.

57. Tennis score : LOVE

In tennis the score of zero is designated as “love”. Some people believe that this usage originates from the French “l’oeuf” (meaning “the egg”). The idea is that the written character “0” looks like an egg.

58. Granola grain : OATS

The names “Granola” and “Granula” were trademarked back in the late 1800s for whole-grain foods that were crumbled and baked until crisp. Granola was created in Dansville, New York in 1894.

59. Skinny South American country : CHILE

The land of Chile has a very distinctive shape. It is a narrow strip that runs up the west coast of South America. The average width of the country is only a little over 100 miles, and yet its length is about 2,700 miles. Chile is touted as the longest country in the world, although I am not so sure what that means exactly. I mean, Russia extends about 4,800 miles from east-to west, so maybe “longest” implies long in the north-south direction?

61. Formerly, formerly : ERST

“Erst” is an archaic way of saying “formerly, before the present time”. The term is mostly seen as part of the word “erstwhile”, an adjective meaning “of times past”.

62. “Hallelujah” songwriter Leonard : COHEN

I’ve never been a big fan of the music of Canadian singer Leonard Cohen (don’t all yell at me at the same time!). That said, his 1984 song “Hallelujah” is superb, and I particularly like the version recorded by Jeff Buckley in 1994.

63. __ Domini : ANNO

The designations Anno Domini (AD, “year of Our Lord”) and Before Christ (BC) are found in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. The dividing point between AD and BC is the year of the conception of Jesus, with AD 1 following 1 BC without a year “0” in between. The AD/BC scheme dates back to AD 525, and gained wide acceptance soon after AD 800. Nowadays a modified version has become popular, with CE (Common/Christian Era) used to replace AD, and BCE (Before the Common/Christian Era) used to replace BC.

64. Ball belles : DEBS

“Deb” is short for “debutante”, which translates from French as “female beginner”.

65. 2014 film set in Alabama : SELMA

“Selma” is a 2014 film about the Selma to Montgomery marches of 1965. Directed by Ava DuVernay, the movie stars David Oyelowo as Martin Luther King, Jr. and Tom Wilkinson as President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Down

1. Miss Hannigan’s charge : ANNIE

Miss Hannigan is a character in the Broadway musical “Annie”. The musical was based on the Harold Gray comic strip “Little Orphan Annie”. There were two subsequent film adaptations, both really quite successful, including one released in 1982 directed by John Huston of all people. It was his only ever musical.

2. Board, in “room and board” : MEALS

A board is a piece of sawn lumber that is significantly longer than it is wide. Centuries ago, the term “board” was extended to mean “table”, and later “meals served on a table”. That’s where we get our phrase “bed and board” meaning “food and a place to sleep”.

3. Sailor’s “Halt!” : AVAST!

“Avast” is a nautical term used to tell someone to stop or desist from what they are doing. The word comes from the Dutch “hou vast” meaning “hold fast”.

4. Central American nation : NICARAGUA

Nicaragua is the largest country in Central America. It lies between Honduras to the north, and Costa Rica to the south. The etymology of the name “Nicaragua” is not very certain. One suggestion is that it is a melding of the name “Nicarao” and “agua”, the Spanish for “water”. Nicarao was the name of the largest city in the area when the Spanish arrived, and it is thought that “agua” refers to the two large lakes: Lake Managua and Lake Nicaragua.

5. Egyptian viper : ASP

The asp is a venomous snake found in the Nile region of Africa. It is so venomous that the asp was used in ancient Egypt and Greece as a means of execution. Cleopatra observed such executions noting that the venom brought on sleepiness without any painful spasms. When the great queen opted to commit suicide, the asp was therefore her chosen method.

8. Paper order : REAM

A ream is 500 sheets of paper. As there were 24 sheets in a quire, and 20 quires made up a ream, there used to be 480 sheets in a ream. Ever since the standard was changed to 500, a 480-sheet packet of paper has been called a “short ream”. We also use the term “reams” to mean a great amount, evolving from the idea of a lot of printed material.

10. Les __-Unis : ETATS

“Les États-Unis” is what French speakers call “the United States”.

11. Whispering party game : TELEPHONE

The party game known as telephone here in the US is also known as Chinese whispers in other nations. The idea of the game is for a message to be whispered from player to player along a line. By the time the message has passed along the whole line, it usually changes due to mishearing. Comparison of the original and final versions of the message can be quite hilarious.

21. Asian New Year : TET

The full name for the New Year holiday in Vietnam is “Tet Nguyen Dan” meaning “Feast of the First Morning”, with the reference being to the arrival of the season of spring. Tet usually falls on the same day as Chinese New Year.

22. Joe Torre’s retired Yankee uniform number : SIX

As a manager, Joe Torre was part of four World Series wins, all of them with the New York Yankees baseball team. Torre is an Italian American who was born in Brooklyn, New York. During the run up (pun intended!) to the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin, Torre carried the Olympic flame part of the way through Florence in Italy, handing it over to the next runner at the famous Ponte Vecchio. I’d guess that was quite a thrill for him …

24. God with a bow : EROS

Eros, the Greek god of love, gives rise to our word “erotic”, meaning “arousing sexual desire”. Eros was referred to in Latin as both Amor (meaning “love”) and Cupid (meaning “desire”).

27. Musty-smelling : FUNKY

Something described as “musty” has as stale or moldy odor. The term derives from an obsolete word “moisty”, as in “moist”.

31. Karate skill award : BELT

“Karate” is a Japanese word meaning “empty hand”, and the related word “karaoke” translates as “empty orchestra”.

32. Swedish auto : SAAB

“SAAB” stands for Svenska Aeroplan AB, which translates into English as Swedish Aeroplane Limited. Although we usually think of SAAB as an auto manufacturer, it is mainly an aircraft manufacturer. If you take small hops in Europe you might find yourself on a SAAB passenger plane. The SAAB automotive division was acquired by General Motors in the year 2000, who then sold it to a Dutch concern in 2010. However, SAAB (automotive) finally went bankrupt in 2011. A Chinese consortium purchased the assets of SAAB Automotive in 2012, and so SAAB vehicles are in production again. The new vehicles are using the SAAB name, but cannot use the SAAB griffin logo, the rights to which have been retained by the mother company.

34. Anna Paquin won her Oscar for “The Piano” at it : AGE ELEVEN

Anna Paquin is an actress from New Zealand who won an Oscar as an 11-year-old for her role in “The Piano”. In the HBO series “True Blood” she plays Sookie Stackhouse, a role for which she won a Golden Globe.

“The Piano” is a 1993 film set and filmed in New Zealand starring Harvey Keitel, Holly Hunter and Anna Paquin. The movie tells the story of a mute piano player and her daughter, and her efforts to regain her piano after it is sold. Holly Hunter managed to get three screen credits in “The Piano”. She was credited for her acting role, for playing her own piano pieces in the film, and for being the sign-language coach for young Anna Paquin.

36. Good luck symbol : HORSESHOE

Some believe that a horseshoe can bring good fortune if it hangs with the ends pointing upwards. acting as a container for good luck. A horseshoe that is hung with the ends pointing down will then bring bad luck.

38. Drew on? : TATTOOED

The word “tattoo” (often shortened to “tat”) was first used in English in the writings of the famous English explorer Captain Cook. In his descriptions of the indelible marks adorning the skin of Polynesian natives, Cook anglicized the Tahitian word “tatau” into our “tattoo”. Tattoos are also sometimes referred to as “ink”.

45. “Cheers” setting : BAR

The wonderful sitcom “Cheers” ran for eleven seasons on NBC, from 1982 to 1993. “Cheers” spawned an equally successful spin-off show called “Frasier”, which also ran for eleven seasons and often featured guest appearances of characters from the original “Cheers”. The Cheers bar was styled on the Bull & Finch Pub in Boston (in which I’ve had a pint of Guinness two!). The owner of the Bill & Finch cleverly agreed to the initial interior and exterior shots, charging only one dollar. Since then he has made millions from selling “Cheers” memorabilia, and also from increased trade.

48. Three-piece pieces : VESTS

Here’s another word that often catches me out. What we call a vest here in the US is a waistcoat back in Ireland. And, the Irish use the word “vest” for an undershirt.

49. Chain saw brand : STIHL

Stihl is a manufacturer of power tools mainly used in landscaping and forestry. The company headquarters is located not far from Stuttgart in Germany. Stihl was founded in 1926 by Andreas Stihl, and first manufactured chainsaws.

50. Western state capital : SALEM

Salem is the state capital of Oregon. It is thought that the city takes its name from the older city of Salem, Massachusetts.

51. Toronto’s Rogers Centre, for one : ARENA

The SkyDome is a stadium in downtown Toronto, home to the Toronto Blue Jays baseball team and the Toronto Argonauts Canadian football team. The SkyDome was officially renamed to the Rogers Centre when it, and the Toronto Blue Jays team, was purchased by Rogers Communications in 2005.

52. __ mater : ALMA

The literal translation for the Latin term “alma mater” is “nourishing mother”. The phrase was used in Ancient Rome to refer to mother goddesses, and in Medieval Christianity the term was used to refer to the Virgin Mary. Nowadays, one’s alma mater is the school one attended, either high school or college, usually one’s last place of education.

53. Faucet brand : MOEN

The Moen line of faucets was started in 1956 by inventor Alfred M, Moen. It was Moen who invented the first single-handed mixing faucet.

55. Accident investigation agcy. : NTSB

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is responsible for the investigation of major accidents involving transportation. Included in this broad definition is the transportation of fluids in pipelines. The organization is independent in that it has no ties to other government agencies or departments so that its investigations can be viewed as “impartial”. The NTSB also earns a little money for the US as it hires out its investigation teams to countries who don’t have the necessary resources available on their own soil.

59. Dosage amts. : CCS

Cubic centimeters (ccs)

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Whirlpool brand : AMANA
6. “M*A*S*H” actor Jamie : FARR
10. Italian smoker : ETNA
14. Saint Kitts neighbor : NEVIS
15. Drink with a polar bear mascot : ICEE
16. Overflow (with) : TEEM
17. Civil rights org. : NAACP
18. Alum : GRAD
19. End of a Basque ball game? : … ALAI
20. She walked into Rick’s gin joint : ILSA
21. Tournament that awards a green jacket : THE MASTERS
23. Springsteen’s __ Band : E STREET
25. Speech therapy subject : LISP
26. Museum collection : ART
27. Show of strength? : FLEX
29. Montreal Canadien, to hockey fans : HAB
32. Wolfgang Puck restaurant chain : SPAGO
35. Litigant : SUER
36. Golfer’s target : HOLE
37. Home of 21-Across : AUGUSTA NATIONAL
40. Real estate measure : AREA
41. Quizzes : ASKS
42. Colgate rival : CREST
43. “Full Frontal” host Samantha : BEE
44. Website with a “Craft Supplies & Tools” section : ETSY
45. Fenway team: Abbr. : BOS
46. Totally at sea : LOST
48. Actress Redgrave : VANESSA
52. Exciting section of 37-Across, familiarly … and a configuration found in four apt places in this puzzle : AMEN CORNER
56. Rating unit : STAR
57. Tennis score : LOVE
58. Granola grain : OATS
59. Skinny South American country : CHILE
60. Swimming event : MEET
61. Formerly, formerly : ERST
62. “Hallelujah” songwriter Leonard : COHEN
63. __ Domini : ANNO
64. Ball belles : DEBS
65. 2014 film set in Alabama : SELMA

Down

1. Miss Hannigan’s charge : ANNIE
2. Board, in “room and board” : MEALS
3. Sailor’s “Halt!” : AVAST!
4. Central American nation : NICARAGUA
5. Egyptian viper : ASP
6. Argue : FIGHT
7. Farm field unit : ACRE
8. Paper order : REAM
9. Emergency status : RED ALERT
10. Les __-Unis : ETATS
11. Whispering party game : TELEPHONE
12. Warm, in a game : NEAR
13. French friends : AMIS
21. Asian New Year : TET
22. Joe Torre’s retired Yankee uniform number : SIX
24. God with a bow : EROS
27. Musty-smelling : FUNKY
28. Grazing grounds : LEAS
30. “What a shame!” : ALAS!
31. Karate skill award : BELT
32. Swedish auto : SAAB
33. Unadulterated : PURE
34. Anna Paquin won her Oscar for “The Piano” at it : AGE ELEVEN
35. Insolence : SASS
36. Good luck symbol : HORSESHOE
38. Drew on? : TATTOOED
39. Tapped symbol : ICON
44. PC bailout key : ESC
45. “Cheers” setting : BAR
47. “You’re __ talk!” : ONE TO
48. Three-piece pieces : VESTS
49. Chain saw brand : STIHL
50. Western state capital : SALEM
51. Toronto’s Rogers Centre, for one : ARENA
52. __ mater : ALMA
53. Faucet brand : MOEN
54. Few and far between : RARE
55. Accident investigation agcy. : NTSB
59. Dosage amts. : CCS

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