LA Times Crossword Answers 15 Apr 2018, Sunday

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Constructed by: Paul Coulter
Edited by: Rich Norris

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Today’s Theme: Mirror Images

Themed answers each include a string of six circled letters. Those letters are two pairs, with the pair on the left being the MIRROR IMAGE of the pair on the right:

  • 22A. Coastal casino center : ATLANTIC CITY
  • 33A. Current route : ELECTRIC CIRCUIT
  • 47A. Chinese and Korean : TONAL LANGUAGES
  • 67A. Hotel evaluation system : STAR RATINGS
  • 90A. Three-dimensional arrangement of atoms inside a diamond, say : CRYSTAL LATTICE
  • 106A. Article seen daily : NEWSPAPER REPORT
  • 120A. Website evaluation tool : USER RESEARCH

Bill’s time: 15m 20s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. High-fives, e.g. : SLAPS

Dusty Baker is a former baseball player and is currently the manager of the Cincinnati Reds. One of Baker’s claims to fame is that he, along with Glenn Burke, is said to have invented the hand gesture we call a “high five”.

6. Big name in Champagne : MUMM

G. H. Mumm is one of the largest Champagne producers in the world. It is located in Reims in northern France and was actually founded by three brothers from Germany, all winemakers from the Rhine Valley.

10. Langston Hughes poem : I, TOO

Langston Hughes was a poet active in the Harlem Renaissance, and someone who helped develop the literary form known as “jazz poetry”. His poem “I, Too, Sing America” was published in 1925.

I, too, sing America.

I am the darker brother.
They send me to eat in the kitchen
When company comes,
But I laugh,
And eat well,
And grow strong.

Tomorrow,
I’ll be at the table
When company comes.
Nobody’ll dare
Say to me,
“Eat in the kitchen,”
Then.

Besides,
They’ll see how beautiful I am
And be ashamed–

I, too, am America.

14. Cinematic FX : CGI

Computer-generated imagery (CGI)

“FX” is an abbreviation for “effects”, as in “special effects”.

17. “The War of the Worlds” narrator of 1938 : WELLES

Orson Welles is perhaps best-remembered in the world of film for his role in 1941’s “Citizen Kane”. In the world of radio, Welles is known for directing and narrating 1938’s famous broadcast of “The War of the Worlds”, a broadcast that convinced many listeners that the Earth was indeed being invaded by aliens.

19. Hum-dinger of an instrument? : KAZOO

The modern instrument we know today as the kazoo was invented by one Alabama Vest of Macon, Georgia in the 1800s. The kazoo first came to the public’s attention at the Georgia State Fair of 1852, when it was known as the “Down-South Submarine” (because of its shape, I would imagine).

22. Coastal casino center : ATLANTIC CITY

Atlantic City, New Jersey was developed in the 1850s as a potential resort town. The first version of the celebrated Atlantic City Boardwalk was installed in 1870. The city’s heyday came with Prohibition, when illegal drinking and gambling thrived in the backrooms of nightclubs and restaurants. After a long period of decline, Atlantic City was revitalized with the introduction of legalized casino gambling in 1976.

26. Champagne word : BRUT

Sparkling wines can be classified according to sweetness. These classifications are, from driest to sweetest:

  • Brut Nature
  • Extra Brut
  • Brut
  • Extra Dry
  • Dry
  • Semi-Dry
  • Sweet

27. Indian nurse : AMAH

“Amah” is an interesting word in that we associate it so much with Asian culture and yet the term actually comes from the Portuguese “ama” meaning “nurse”. Ama was imported into English in the days of the British Raj in India when a wet-nurse became known as an amah.

28. First name in architecture : EERO

Eero Saarinen was a Finnish-American architect who was renowned in this country for his unique designs for public buildings such as Gateway Arch in St. Louis, Dulles International Airport Terminal, and the TWA building at JFK. The list of his lesser-known, but still impressive, works includes several buildings erected on academic campuses. For example, the Chapel and Kresge Auditorium on the MIT campus, the Emma Hartman Noyes House at Vassar College, the Law School building at the University of Chicago, and Yale’s David S. Ingalls Rink.

31. Noodle concoction? : IDEA

“Noodle” and “bean” are slang terms for the head.

38. Charlie Brown correspondent : PEN PAL

In the “Peanuts” comic strip, Charlie Brown has a pen-pal. Actually, he refers to him as his “pencil-pal”, as Charlie Brown doesn’t write well with a pen. Said pencil-pal was an unnamed male when introduced in 1958. In 1994, “he” became a “she”, a girl named Morag from Scotland.

40. Lights into : ASSAILS

To light into something is to attack it forcefully.

41. It floods Florence periodically : ARNO

The Arno is the principal river in the Tuscany region of Italy, and passes through the cities of Florence and Pisa. Famously the Arno flooded in 1966, the worst flood in the region for centuries. There were numerous deaths and extensive destruction of priceless art treasures, particularly in Florence.

45. “We need a cat!” : EEK!

There’s a mouse!

46. Costa __ : RICA

Costa Rica is a country in Central America that is bordered by Nicaragua to the north and Panama to the South. Costa Rica is remarkable in my opinion, a leader on the world stage in many areas. It has been referred to as the “greenest” country in the world, the “happiest” country in the world, and has a highly educated populace. In 1949, the country unilaterally abolished its own army … permanently!

47. Chinese and Vietnamese: TONAL LANGUAGES

In tonal languages, words that are spelled the same can be imparted with different meanings by use of inflection. The most widely spoken tonal language is Mandarin Chinese.

54. Pretentious sort : PSEUD

A pseudo (or “pseud”) is an artificial or pretentious person.

57. Smartphone ancestor, briefly : PDA

Personal digital assistant (PDA)

59. Cos. with Xings : RRS

Railroad (RR) companies (cos.) have lots of crossings (Xings).

61. Like this ans. : ACR

This is an across (acr.) answer (ans.).

63. St. Pete’s place : FLA

Saint Petersburg, Florida is often referred to as “St. Pete” by locals and visitors alike. Located on a peninsula lying between Tampa Bay and the Gulf of Mexico, St. Pete was founded in 1888 and named for Saint Petersburg in Russia. The co-founders were Russian immigrant Peter Demens and Detroit native John C. Williams. The pair tossed a coin for the privilege of naming the new city, and Demens won. Williams lost, but did get to name the city’s first hostelry “The Detroit Hotel”.

77. “__ the fields we go … ” : O’ER

The traditional Christmas song “Jingle Bells” was first published in 1857, penned by James Lord Pierpont. We associate the song with Christmas, although in fact Pierpont wrote it as a celebration of Thanksgiving.

Dashing through the snow
In a one horse open sleigh
O’er the fields we go
Laughing all the way

78. Common Market letters : EEC

The European Economic Community (EEC) was also known as the “Common Market”. The EEC was a NAFTA-like structure that was eventually absorbed into today’s European Union (EU).

83. Courses for coll. credit : APS

The Advanced Placement (AP) program offers college-level courses to kids who are still in high school. After being tested at the end of the courses, successful students receive credits that count towards a college degree.

84. Third-least populous state : ALASKA

The three most populous US states are, in order:

  1. California
  2. Texas
  3. Florida

The three least populous US states are, in order:

  1. Wyoming
  2. Vermont
  3. (District of Columbia)
  4. Alaska

87. Staples Center player : LAKER

The Staples Center is a sports arena in Los Angeles that opened in 1999. The Staples Center is home to several sporting franchises, including the LA Lakers and LA Clippers basketball teams and the LA Kings hockey team.

88. Ladybug’s lunch : APHID

Aphids are called “greenfly” back in the British Isles where I come from. The most effective way to control aphids, in my experience, is to make sure there are plenty of ladybugs in the garden (called “ladybirds” in Ireland!).

The insect we know as a ladybug has seven spots on the wing covers. These seven spots gave rise to the common name “ladybug”, as in the Middle Ages the insect was called the “beetle of Our Lady”. The spots were said to symbolize the Seven Joys and Seven Sorrows, events in the life of the Blessed Virgin Mary called out in the Roman Catholic tradition.

90. Three-dimensional arrangement of atoms inside a diamond, say : CRYSTAL LATTICE

“Crystal lattice” is the name given to the three-dimensional arrangement of atoms or ions in a crystal.

93. Acidity-correcting fertilizer : MARL

Marl is a mud that is rich in calcium carbonate. Marl, or marlstone, is often used as a fertilizer for lime-deficient soil.

94. Asian honorific : SRI

“Sri” is a title of respect for a male in India.

97. Biol. branch : ECOL

Ecology (ecol.) is a branch of biology (biol.).

102. Play the flute : TOOTLE

A flute is a woodwind instrument that doesn’t have a reed. Instead, sound is produced by blowing air across an opening. A flute player is often referred to as a flautist (sometimes “flutist”). Flutes have been around a long, long time. Primitive flutes found in modern-day Germany date back 43,000 to 35,000 years, which makes the flute the oldest known musical instrument.

111. Mystery writer Nevada __ : BARR

Nevada Barr is an author noted for her series of mystery novels set in National Parks that feature the park ranger and detective Anna Pigeon.

112. Middle of a Latin trio : AMAS

“Amo, amas, amat” translates from Latin as “I love, you love, he/she/it loves”.

113. Wind worth a warning : GALE

A gale is a very strong wind, a wind that is defined by Beaufort wind scale as a wind with speeds from 50 to just over 100 kilometers per hour.

123. Champagne word : SEC

Sparkling wines can be classified according to sweetness. These classifications are, from driest to sweetest:

  • Brut Nature
  • Extra Brut
  • Brut
  • Extra Dry
  • Dry
  • Semi-Dry
  • Sweet

124. Iota : WHIT

Both “whit” and “fig” are used to describe a trivial amount, a mere trifle.

126. One getting smashed at a bash? : PINATA

Piñatas originated in Mexico, probably among the Aztecs or Mayans. Today piñatas are usually made from cardboard that is brightly decorated with papier-mâché. Traditionally a piñata was made out of a clay pot, adorned with feathers and ribbons and filled with small treasures. During religious ceremonies the clay pots would be suspended and broken open so that the contents would spill out onto the ground at the feet of a god as an offering.

127. Tats : INK

The word “tattoo” (often shortened to “tat”) was first used in English in the writings of the famous English explorer Captain Cook. In his descriptions of the indelible marks adorning the skin of Polynesian natives, Cook anglicized the Tahitian word “tatau” into our “tattoo”. Tattoos are also sometimes referred to as “ink”.

128. Nasdaq rival : NYSE

The roots of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) go back to 1792 when a group of 24 stock brokers set up the New York Stock & Exchange Board. They did so in an agreement signed under a buttonwood tree outside 68 Wall Street. That document became known as the Buttonwood Agreement. Today, the NYSE is located in National Historic Landmark building with the address 11 Wall Street in Lower Manhattan, New York City.

The NASDAQ trading system created in 1971 is the successor to the over-the-counter (OTC) trading system that was common at the time. OTC trading is done directly between two parties without being facilitated by an exchange.

129. Ladies of Sp. : SRAS

The equivalent of “Mrs.” in French is “Mme.” (Madame), in Spanish is “Sra.” (Señora) and in Portuguese is also “Sra.” (Senhora).

130. Flippant : SASSY

The adjectives “flip” and “flippant” mean the same thing, namely “frivolously disrespectful, lacking in seriousness”.

Down

1. Q-tip : SWAB

Cotton swabs were originally marketed under the name “Baby Gays”. This was changed in 1926 to “Q-Tips”, with the Q standing for “quality”.

4. Typewriter roller : PLATEN

The original platens were flat plates used to press paper against inked type to create an impression in the process of letterpress printing. The term was then used with newer printing machines and typewriters, describing the rollers that pressed paper against printing media.

5. D.C. VIP : SEN

The six-year terms enjoyed by US senators are staggered, so that every two years about one third of the 100 US Senate seats come up for reelection.

6. Papier-__ : MACHE

Papier-mâché is an artistic medium made from strips of paper, or pulped paper, that is bound with an adhesive. “Papier-mâché” translates from French as mashed or chewed paper.

7. Action film weapon : UZI

The first Uzi submachine gun was designed in the late 1940s by Major Uziel “Uzi” Gal of the Israel Defense Forces, who gave his name to the gun.

8. Sacred songs : MOTETS

A motet is a simple musical composition based on a sacred text that is usually sung without an accompaniment. The term “motet” is a diminutive form of “mot”, the French for “word”.

9. Journalist Bill inducted into the TV Hall of Fame in 1995 : MOYERS

Journalist Bill Moyers served as White House Press Secretary under President Johnson from 1965 to 1967. These days, Moyers is probably best known for hosting the news program “Bill Moyers Journal” on PBS for many years, finally coming off the air in 2010.

12. Washington Monument, for one : OBELISK

An obelisk is a rectangular column that tapers to the top and is capped by a pyramid shape.

Completed in 1885, the Washington Monument was the world’s tallest structure, but only for a few years. The Washington Monument lost its “world title” in 1889, on the completion of the Eiffel Tower. It retains the title of world’s tallest stone structure, standing as almost 555 feet in height.

14. Dior or Klein : COUTURIER

“Haute couture”, literally “high dressmaking” in French, is a name given to the creation of exclusive fashions. A couturier is someone who creates or sells such fashions.

Christian Dior was a French fashion designer. As WWII approached, Dior was called up by the French military, drawing a temporary halt to his career in fashion. He left the army in 1942 and for the duration of the war designed clothes for wives of Nazi officers and French collaborators. After the war his designs became so popular that he helped re-establish Paris as the fashion center of the world.

Calvin Klein is an American fashion designer who was born in the Bronx in New York City. Klein’s biography, entitled “Obsession”, is named for one the most famous brands in his line of fragrances.

15. Beetle juice? : GAS

VW stands for Volkswagen, which translates from German into “people’s car”. The original Volkswagen design was the Beetle and was built under a directive from Adolf Hitler, who wanted a cheap car built that ordinary people could afford to purchase. He awarded the contract to engineer Ferdinand Porsche, whose name (paradoxically) would forever be associated with high performance, expensive cars. The Beetle was the official name of the VW model released in North America, but it was usually referred to as a “Bug” here in the US, and a “Beetle” elsewhere in the world.

18. Transit syst. component : STA

A station (“stn.” or “sta.”) is a railroad (RR) stop.

19. Longtime TV broadcaster of 87-Across games : KCAL

KCAL is a TV (and radio) station located in Los Angeles. KCAL’s studios are in Studio City, and its transmitter is located on the top of Mount Wilson in the San Gabriel Mountains.

23. Well-shod Marcos : IMELDA

Many moons ago, I spent a couple of very happy years living in Manila in the Philippines. I had an apartment there, and residing in the apartment building next door was Imelda Marcos, along with all of her shoes I assume …

25. Annual winter telecast, with “The” : OSCARS

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) is the organization that gives the annual Academy Awards also known as the “Oscars”. The root of the name “Oscar” is hotly debated, but what is agreed is that the award was officially named “Oscar” in 1939. The first Academy Awards were presented at a brunch in 1929 with an audience of just 29 people. The Awards ceremony is a slightly bigger event these days …

29. Coastline feature : RIA

A drowned valley might be called a ria or a fjord, with both formed as sea level rises. A ria is a drowned valley created by river erosion, and a fjord is a drowned valley created by glaciation.

34. __ belli: act of war : CASUS

“Casus belli” is Latin for “a case of war”. The expression refers to an act that provokes or justifies a war. The related phrase “casus foederis” (a case for the alliance) refers to a threat against an ally that triggers a war.

35. 2016 W.S. losers to the Cubs : CLE

The Chicago Cubs won the 2016 World Series four games to three over the Cleveland Indians. That marked the first World Series win for the Cubs since 1908. The Indians would have liked a win too, as their last World Series title was in 1948.

43. IV part : INTRA-

One might see an intravenous drips (IV) in an intensive care unit (ICU).

47. __ McAn shoes : THOM

Thom McAn footwear was introduced in 1922 by the Melville Corporation (now CVS Caremark). The brand was named after a Scottish golfer called Thomas McCann. The Thom McAn line is epitomized by the comfortable leather casual and dress shoe, so sales have really been hurt in recent decades by the growing popularity of sneakers.

48. The last Mrs. Chaplin : OONA

Oona O’Neill dated J. D. Salinger and Orson Welles in her teens, but ended up marrying Charlie Chaplin. Oona was still quite young when she married Chaplin, much to the dismay of her famous father, playwright Eugene O’Neill. Eugene went as far as disowning 18-year-old Oona because of the marriage to 54-year-old Chaplin.

50. Creator of many talking animals : AESOP

Aesop is remembered today as a fabulist, a writer of fables. Aesop lived in Ancient Greece, probably around the sixth century BC. Supposedly he was born a slave, somehow became a free man, but then met with a sorry end. Aesop was sent to the city of Delphi on a diplomatic mission but instead insulted the Delphians. He was tried on a trumped-up charge of stealing from a temple, sentenced to death and was thrown off a cliff.

52. Cabbage : GELT

“Gelt” is the Yiddish word for “money”.

53. Morales of “The Brink” : ESAI

“The Brink” is a TV comedy that ran for just one season, starting in 2015. The show stars Tim Robbins and Jack Black, and centers on a geopolitical crisis in Pakistan.

54. Frying pan spray : PAM

PAM cooking oil was introduced in 1961 by Leon Rubin and Arthur Meyerhoff. The name “PAM” is an acronym … standing for “Product of Arthur Meyerhoff”. Who’d a thunk it …?

58. Frisbee, e.g. : DISC

The Frisbee concept started back in 1938 with a couple who had an upturned cake pan that they were tossing between each other on Santa Monica Beach in California. They were offered 25 cents for the pan on the spot, and as pans could be bought for 5 cents, the pair figured there was a living to be earned.

62. Forklift load: Abbr. : CTNS

Carton (ctn.)

65. Classic Fender guitar, familiarly : STRAT

The Stratocaster (often “Strat”) is an electric guitar made by Fender since 1954. The company that made Fender electric guitars was founded in Fullerton, California in 1946 by Leo Fender.

70. Author Zora __ Hurston : NEALE

Zora Neale Hurston was an American author, most famous for her 1937 novel “Their Eyes Were Watching God”. Like the author, the main character in the novel is an African American woman, a part played by Halle Berry in a television movie adaptation that first aired in 2005.

72. Collaborative website : WIKI

A wiki is a website in which users are allowed to create and edit content themselves. The term “wiki” comes from the name of the first such site, introduced in 1994 and called WikiWikiWeb. “Wiki” is a Hawaiian word for “quick”, and is used because comprehensive content is created very quickly a there are so many collaborators contributing to the site.

73. Crude gp.? : OPEC

The OPEC cartel (the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) was formally established in 1960 and has been headquartered in Vienna since 1965. The US is actually the third largest oil producer in the world (after Russia and Saudi Arabia). One reason America isn’t in OPEC, even though we are a big producer, is that we import a lot more than we export. But we all probably knew that already …

80. Staple for a collegian on a tight budget : RAMEN

Ramen is a noodle dish composed of Chinese-style wheat noodles in a meat or fish broth flavored with soy or miso sauce. Ramen is usually topped with sliced pork and dried seaweed. The term “ramen” is a also used for precooked, instant noodles that come in single-serving, solid blocks.

82. Atavism : THROWBACK

An atavism is an evolutionary throwback, the reappearance of a trait that disappeared in prior generations. One example of an atavism would be a vestigial tail that might be found on some newborn babies.

86. Mary __ cosmetics : KAY

Mary Kay Ash founded her skincare and cosmetics company, somewhat ominously on Friday, 13th September 1963. In 1968, Mary Kay Ash bought herself a pink Cadillac, specially painted to match the color of one of her compacts. The car became so famous that she gave away five of them to her top saleswoman, a tradition that endures to this day.

87. No. 2 at the statehouse : LT GOV

In the US, a lieutenant governor (lt. gov.) is usually the second-in-command to the governor of a state.

90. Film lover : CINEASTE

A cineaste is a cinephile, a person with a deep interest in cinema. The term “cineaste” comes from the French “cinéaste”, which refers to a filmmaker.

100. Some rechargeable shavers : BRAUNS

Braun is a manufacturer of consumer goods based in Kronberg, Germany.

101. One offering quarters : LESSOR

We use the term “quarters” for a place of abode, especially housing for military personnel. Back in the late 16th century, quarters were a portion (quarter) of a town reserved for a military force.

103. Albania’s capital : TIRANA

Tirana is the capital of Albania, and the nation’s largest city.

The Republic of Albania is a country in the Balkans in southeastern Europe. Albania was made a communist state after WWII but became independent again with the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1990. Albania has been a member of NATO since 2009, and was accepted as an official candidate to join the European Union in 2014. The nation’s capital and largest city is Tirana.

104. Actresses Linney and Dern : LAURAS

The wonderfully talented actress Laura Linney is a native New Yorker from Manhattan. The performances of hers that I most admire are in “The Truman Show” and “Love Actually” on the big screen, and in the HBO miniseries “John Adams” on the small screen.

The actress Laura Dern is the daughter of the actors Bruce Dern and Diane Ladd. Among her many notable roles, Laura played the Florida Secretary of State Katherine Harris in the 2008 movie “Recount”, and Dr. Ellie Sattler in the 1993 blockbuster “Jurassic Park”.

107. Seafood serving : PRAWN

The terms “prawn” and “shrimp” are often used interchangeably on menus. Over in the UK, the term “prawn” is most common, while “shrimp” is seen more often here in North America. Sometimes there is a differentiation from a food standpoint, with “prawn” being used for larger species and “shrimp” for smaller species. As a result, “jumbo prawns” seems to be an acceptable descriptor for a dish, whereas “jumbo shrimp” seems to be an oxymoron.

108. Tough bosses to work for : OGRES

I’ve known a couple …

114. Seer’s claim : ESP

Extrasensory perception (ESP)

116. Open carriage : SHAY

A chaise is a light carriage with a folding hood that transports one or two people. “Chaise” is the French for “chair”, and takes its name from the “sedan chair” means of transportation. In the US, the name “chaise” evolved into “shay”.

117. Meas. checked after tire rotation : PSI

Pounds per square inch (PSI) is a measure of pressure.

118. Cariou of “Sweeney Todd” : LEN

Len Cariou is a Canadian actor who is famous for his Broadway portrayal of “Sweeney Todd”. I most recognize Cariou from supporting roles in “Flags of Our Fathers” and “Thirteen Days”, two great movies.

“Sweeney Todd” was originally a 1936 film, and later in 1973 a play, then a 1979 musical and a movie adaptation of the musical in 2007. After Sweeney Todd has killed his victims, his partner in crime Mrs. Lovett helped him dispose of the bodies by taking the flesh and baking it into meat pies that she sold in her pie shop. Ugh!

119. “__ the season … ” : ‘TIS

The music for the Christmas song “Deck the Halls” is a traditional Welsh tune that dates back to the 16th century. The same tune was used by Mozart for a violin and piano duet. The lyrics with which we are familiar (other than the “f-la-la”) are American in origin, and were recorded in 19th century.

“’Tis the season to be jolly, Fa la la la la la la la!”

121. Pueblo pronoun : ESA

The Pueblo peoples are Native Americans from the American Southwest who are known for their construction of towns and villages comprising buildings made from adobe and stone. The Pueblo inhabited pit houses dug into cliffs prior to c. 1050 CE. After this date, they started to develop planned village that included apartment-like structure often located on ledges of rock that were easy to defend. The largest of these villages extant today is the magnificent Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico. It is a “must see” when visiting the area …

122. Frozen Wasser : EIS

In German, “Eis” (ice) is frozen “Wasser” (water).

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. High-fives, e.g. : SLAPS
6. Big name in Champagne : MUMM
10. Langston Hughes poem : I, TOO
14. Cinematic FX : CGI
17. “The War of the Worlds” narrator of 1938 : WELLES
19. Hum-dinger of an instrument? : KAZOO
20. It’s composed of balances : DEBT
21. Crew member : OAR
22. Coastal casino center : ATLANTIC CITY
24. Block-stocking building : ICEHOUSE
26. Champagne word : BRUT
27. Indian nurse : AMAH
28. First name in architecture : EERO
30. Out of concern that : LEST
31. Noodle concoction? : IDEA
33. Current route : ELECTRIC CIRCUIT
38. Charlie Brown correspondent : PEN PAL
40. Lights into : ASSAILS
41. It floods Florence periodically : ARNO
42. Straightens up : TIDIES
45. “We need a cat!” : EEK!
46. Costa __ : RICA
47. Chinese and Vietnamese: TONAL LANGUAGES
54. Pretentious sort : PSEUD
55. Poppycock : HOOEY
56. Some decision makers : TOSSES
57. Smartphone ancestor, briefly : PDA
59. Cos. with Xings : RRS
60. Source of stress, probably : ONUS
61. Like this ans. : ACR
63. St. Pete’s place : FLA
64. Goals : AIMS
66. Hombre’s hand : MANO
67. Hotel evaluation system : STAR RATINGS
71. Terrible time? : TWOS
75. Builder’s need : PLAN
77. “__ the fields we go … ” : O’ER
78. Common Market letters : EEC
79. Advanced, as old age : RIPE
80. Tell : RAT
83. Courses for coll. credit : APS
84. Third-least populous state : ALASKA
87. Staples Center player : LAKER
88. Ladybug’s lunch : APHID
90. Three-dimensional arrangement of atoms inside a diamond, say : CRYSTAL LATTICE
93. Acidity-correcting fertilizer : MARL
94. Asian honorific : SRI
96. Watching closely : EYEING
97. Biol. branch : ECOL
98. Like a well-grounded argument : TENABLE
102. Play the flute : TOOTLE
106. Article seen daily : NEWSPAPER REPORT
110. Lab vessel : VIAL
111. Mystery writer Nevada __ : BARR
112. Middle of a Latin trio : AMAS
113. Wind worth a warning : GALE
115. Regrets : RUES
117. Pretends : PLAYACTS
120. Website evaluation tool : USER RESEARCH
123. Champagne word : SEC
124. Iota : WHIT
125. Long time follower? : … NO SEE
126. One getting smashed at a bash? : PINATA
127. Tats : INK
128. Nasdaq rival : NYSE
129. Ladies of Sp. : SRAS
130. Flippant : SASSY

Down

1. Q-tip : SWAB
2. Speak without restraint : LET RIP
3. Refer (to) : ALLUDE
4. Typewriter roller : PLATEN
5. D.C. VIP : SEN
6. Papier-__ : MACHE
7. Action film weapon : UZI
8. Sacred songs : MOTETS
9. Journalist Bill inducted into the TV Hall of Fame in 1995 : MOYERS
10. Follies : IDIOCIES
11. Private eye : TEC
12. Washington Monument, for one : OBELISK
13. Additional : OTHER
14. Dior or Klein : COUTURIER
15. Beetle juice? : GAS
16. Boiling state : IRE
18. Transit syst. component : STA
19. Longtime TV broadcaster of 87-Across games : KCAL
23. Well-shod Marcos : IMELDA
25. Annual winter telecast, with “The” : OSCARS
29. Coastline feature : RIA
32. In a fitting way : APTLY
34. __ belli: act of war : CASUS
35. 2016 W.S. losers to the Cubs : CLE
36. Bring upon oneself : INCUR
37. Contemptible sorts : TOADS
39. Afflict : AIL
43. IV part : INTRA-
44. I strain? : EGO
47. __ McAn shoes : THOM
48. The last Mrs. Chaplin : OONA
49. It may be proper : NOUN
50. Creator of many talking animals : AESOP
51. To the extent that : AS FAR AS
52. Cabbage : GELT
53. Morales of “The Brink” : ESAI
54. Frying pan spray : PAM
57. Scrolling unit : PAGE
58. Frisbee, e.g. : DISC
61. “Immediately!” : ASAP!
62. Forklift load: Abbr. : CTNS
65. Classic Fender guitar, familiarly : STRAT
68. Crowd sound : ROAR
69. Count (on) : RELY
70. Author Zora __ Hurston : NEALE
72. Collaborative website : WIKI
73. Crude gp.? : OPEC
74. Bone-dry : SERE
76. Chap : LAD
80. Staple for a collegian on a tight budget : RAMEN
81. On the double : APACE
82. Atavism : THROWBACK
85. Exorbitant : STEEP
86. Mary __ cosmetics : KAY
87. No. 2 at the statehouse : LT GOV
89. “You got that right!” : I’LL SAY!
90. Film lover : CINEASTE
91. Small amount : LITTLE
92. “Is that __?” : A NO
94. Carb-loaded : STARCHY
95. Gym unit : REP
99. Inlet or cove : ARM
100. Some rechargeable shavers : BRAUNS
101. One offering quarters : LESSOR
103. Albania’s capital : TIRANA
104. Actresses Linney and Dern : LAURAS
105. Gives a seat to : ELECTS
107. Seafood serving : PRAWN
108. Tough bosses to work for : OGRES
109. Hard to come by : RARE
114. Seer’s claim : ESP
116. Open carriage : SHAY
117. Meas. checked after tire rotation : PSI
118. Cariou of “Sweeney Todd” : LEN
119. “__ the season … ” : ‘TIS
121. Pueblo pronoun : ESA
122. Frozen Wasser : EIS

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15 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 15 Apr 2018, Sunday”

    1. Wash Post: 39 minutes, 4 errors. Mainly trying to figure out the proper spoonerism for a couple of the items and getting it wrong.

      @Jeff
      Not exactly an afternoon. The roughest stretch of puzzles I get is the NYT Thu-Sun when I obtain the newspapers from my source. Usually it’s Monday night at latest before I finish those and sometimes into Tuesday (about to start a new set now). I really do need to cut down, but don’t know what, especially since I try to do most of the good challenging puzzles opposed to Monday/Tuesday stuff to get better than the glacial pace I usually do puzzles at.

  1. LAT: 20:31, with one idiotic error that I knew was an error. “So why didn’t you change it?,” you ask … and I have no good answer 😜. Newsday: 14:51, no errors.

    And I completed about half of Croce’s latest non-crossword before turning out the light and going to sleep. It comes in three versions – “hardest”, “moderate”, and “easier” – and I decided to work on the first of those, which may have been a tactical error (but I can always switch down if I weaken 😜). A good tussle, and probably good for the old gray cells.

    1. It took me two or three more hours to complete the Croce puzzle. In the end, a good ego booster, but it was touch and go whether I was going to give up on the thing … 😳

  2. 34:03. I got the theme early and used it often which made the puzzle easier than usual. I guess it’s not a palindrome if it’s not a real word. Is palindromelike a word?

    Finally caught up with puzzles from this weekend. In the last 24 hours, I’ve done the Friday, Saturday and Sunday NYT as well as the Saturday and Sunday LAT. Although Dave and Glenn would call that “an afternoon”, I need a break. Whew…

    Best –

  3. Good time-killer of a Sunday puzzle. Last three letters in one word are the reverse of the first three in the next … that’s it? OK.
    Three champagne clues? OK.
    APS/CTNS/ASAP/ACR block? OK.
    (Expect some PSEUD to pretend he knew that MARL is the acidity-correcting fertilizer we keep hearing about.)

  4. “MOTET”?
    “MARL”?
    Not being a champagne drinker, I would never get Mumm, which made it impossible to get Motet.
    Also, I thought a crossword puzzle is meant to be relaxing and challenging, not for bragging rights as to who solved it the quickest. Who cares?

    1. @Gary –
      You certainly don’t have to pay any attention to anyone’s time if you so chose. I don’t think anyone is bragging. Bill posts because he’s actually a competitive solver, and some people (myself included) like to compare how they did to his time in particular. It’s his blog. People want to see his time every day. I’ve beaten his time exactly once in 5 years, and I intend to have that puzzle framed at a later date.

      Others use this space to track their solve times over long periods of time for health reasons (e.g. looking for signs of aging that might have a genetic component to them), and most do it just to see how hard the puzzle really was. Sometimes I wonder if I just had a tough time because I was tired. I always like seeing what others do just to see my own improvement for my own sake. That’s part of the fun of doing them daily over the long haul.

      Good grief, if I (or anyone else) were bragging, I’d just lie and give some time faster than everyone else’s every day. There’s no crossword police tracking this stuff.

      That may or may not make people posting times more palatable to you, but I personally don’t take anyone on this blog as bragging about anything.

      Best –

    2. @Gary
      No one is certainly trying to get bragging rights on anything in here. People all have their own reasons behind the things they do. Mine, since I can solve most puzzles adequately, is to generate a guage of how well I did on the puzzle. It’s useful, too, when something seems “quick” or “slow” to see exactly what it is – when I started seriously timing is when I finished a Friday NYT incredibly quickly and didn’t know exactly how fast. I also use the time to give me an idea of when it’s time to give up on a particular puzzle (usually 60 minutes). Then, I do compare with what others post in order to determine how difficult the puzzle was from a more objective place than my own – was it hard for me since I’m not skilled enough or for everybody?

      A post I wrote on the topic the last time it came up.

      Overall, there’s nothing nefarious about it with anyone here. I know with me, if there are “bragging rights”, it’s with my old self more than with anyone here.

      1. @ Gary
        I love reading peoples times for solving puzzles. Many are amazing to me and I would never post mine because I would be too embarrassed!

  5. Wazzup gang?! 😃
    Started off strong– got the theme early, which helped — but I got mired in the southeast and finally peeked for about 4 answers. I had USER RESOURCE instead of RESEARCH, and that screwed me up!! Not a bad Sunday puzzle tho.
    Dave– Croce has difficulty levels sometimes? I should check that out! I would of course go for the easy version, since I struggle mightily when I’ve tried his puzzles. Will visit his site to see the non-crossword of which you speak…
    Be well~~🐧

    1. @Carrie …

      I have never known Croce to rate one of his crossword puzzles, but he occasionally posts a word puzzle of some other kind and, when he does, he often (usually?) posts two or three different versions of it. (I think he did more of this at the beginning, in 2014, than he does now.) I don’t often do them, but Friday’s kind of reached out and grabbed me.

      BEQ is the only constructor I know of who consistently rates his own puzzles (and I often disagree with his ratings).

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