LA Times Crossword Answers 5 May 2018, Saturday

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Constructed by: Samuel A. Donaldson & Erik Agard
Edited by: Rich Norris

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Today’s Theme: None

Bill’s time: 11m 54s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

14. Literally, “something for something” : QUID PRO QUO

“Quid pro quo” is Latin for “something for something”, i.e. a swap.

16. “Once more __ the breach”: “Henry V” : UNTO

Shakespeare’s play “Henry V” is more correctly called “The Life of Henry the Fifth”. The story mainly focuses on his life before and immediately after the king’s celebrated victory over the French at the Battle of Agincourt. “Henry V” includes one of Shakespeare’s most celebrated speeches, an address by the king to his troops at the siege of Harfleur, with the opening lines:

Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more;
Or close the wall up with our English dead …

18. “Deadwood” actress Jewell : GERI

Geri Jewell’s appearances on the TV show “The Facts of Life” were remarkable in that she was the first actor with a disability to have a regular role on a prime-time show. Jewell was born with cerebral palsy. More recently, Jewell had a recurring role in the western drama “Deadwood”.

22. Virginia senator Kaine : TIM

Tim Kaine took office as US Senator for Virginia in 2013, having served as the state’s governor from 2006 to 2010. He was also chairman of the Democratic National Committee from 2009 until 2011. Famously, Senator Kaine ran as vice presidential running mate in Hillary Clinton’s unsuccessful bid for the presidency in 2016.

25. “__ Meenie”: Kingston/Bieber hit : EENIE

“Eenie Meenie” is a 2010 song by Sean Kingston and Justin Bieber. Nope, never heard it …

“Sean Kingston” is the stage name of Jamaican-American singer Kisean Anderson. He was born in Miami, Florida, but spend his first years in Kingston, Jamaica (hence the stage name).

Justin Bieber is a young pop singer from London, Ontario. Bieber was actually discovered on YouTube by talent manager Scooter Brown. Fans of Bieber call themselves “Beliebers”. Personally, I’m no believer in Bieber …

31. New York home of the Himalayan Highlands : BRONX ZOO

The Bronx Zoo in New York City is the largest metropolitan zoo in the country, and is located right on the Bronx River.

33. Duck Hunt platform : NES

“Duck Hunt” is a video game. Not for me though …

34. Southwestern plant whose oil is used in cosmetics : JOJOBA

Jojoba oil is produced from the seed of the jojoba plant. The oil is used in the cosmetic industry as a replacement for the now banned whale oil. Jojoba oil is also a natural fungicide and is used to control mildew.

38. Rival of SEA and OAK : LAA

The Anaheim Angels baseball team are today more correctly called the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (LAA). The “Angels” name dates back to 1961 when the team was founded in the “City of Angels”, Los Angeles. When the franchise moved to Anaheim in 1965 they were known as the California Angels, then the Anaheim Angels, and most recently the Los Angeles Angels at Anaheim. The Angels are also known as “the Halos”.

The Seattle Mariners (SEA) are one of only two Major League teams never to have appeared in a World Series. The other is the Washington Nationals. The Mariners are owned by the Nintendo Corporation of America, making them one of three Major League teams owned by businesses. The other two are the Atlanta Braves (owned by Liberty Media) and the Toronto Blue Jays (owned by Rogers Communications).

The Oakland Athletics (OAK) baseball franchise was founded back in 1901 as the Philadelphia Athletics. The team became the Kansas City Athletics in 1955 and moved to Oakland in 1968. Today, the Athletics are usually referred to as “the A’s”.

41. Design that’s just over a foot : ANKLE TAT

The word “tattoo” (often shortened to “tat”) was first used in English in the writings of the famous English explorer Captain Cook. In his descriptions of the indelible marks adorning the skin of Polynesian natives, Cook anglicized the Tahitian word “tatau” into our “tattoo”. Tattoos are also sometimes referred to as “ink”.

43. “¿Cómo __?” : ESTAS

“Cómo estas?” is Spanish for “how are you?”

47. Dali contemporary : SERT

José Maria Sert was a painter of murals from Catalan. He was a good friend of fellow-artist Salvador Dali.

51. Coolidge is famous for it : TERSENESS

President Calvin Coolidge, the only US President to have been born on July 4th, was known as a man of few words. It was while he was serving as Vice-President to in the administration of Warren G. Harding, that Coolidge earned the nickname “Silent Cal”. There is a famous story told about Coolidge’s reticence that I would love to think is true, attributed to the poet Dorothy Parker. Sitting beside him at dinner, she remarked to him, “Mr. Coolidge, I’ve made a bet against a fellow who said it was impossible to get more than two words out of you.” His famous reply: “You lose.”

54. Sched. uncertainty : TBA

Something not yet on the schedule (“sked” or “sched.”) is to be advised/announced (TBA).

55. What contacts may help : EYES

The concepts that underpin the technology of contact lenses date back to Leonardo Da Vinci. Although Da Vinci didn’t propose the development of the contact lens, he did write about correcting vision by submerging the eye in a bowl of water. Over a hundred years later, René Descartes made a somewhat impractical suggestion, but along the right lines, of using a glass tube filled with liquid that could be placed in contact with the eye to correct vision. The first real contact lenses were developed by German ophthalmologist Adolf Gaston Eugen Fick in 1887.

60. Algonquian language : CREE

The Cree are one of the largest groups of Native Americans on the continent. In the US most of the Cree nation live in Montana on a reservation shared with the Ojibwe people. In Canada most of the Cree live in Manitoba.

61. Drink with a croissant, maybe : CAFE AU LAIT

“Café au lait” (coffee with milk) is usually strong drip coffee to which one adds steamed milk. Well, that’s the way we tend to make in this country.

Although similar pastries have been around since the 13th century, the croissant was introduced in a Viennese bakery in Paris in 1839. The pastry was named for its shape, as “croissant” is French for “crescent”.

62. Toy truck name : HESS

The Hess Corporation is an oil company based in New York City. In 1964, the company started selling toy trucks with the Hess logo on them, in Hess gas stations. The company has been selling them every since, bringing out new models just before Christmas. Hess toy trucks have become quite collectible and the old ones can fetch a pretty penny.

Down

2. Ball State University city : MUNCIE

In the 1920s, two sociologists conducted a study in a “typical Middle-American community” that they dubbed “Middletown, USA”. It turned out that the actual community in the study was Muncie, Indiana.

Ball State University is located in Muncie, Indiana. The school took on the name “Ball” in recognition of the generosity of the Ball Brothers, local industrialists who saved the institution from collapse in 1917 by intervening financially.

5. “Ask Me Another” co-producer : NPR

“Ask Me Another” is a National Public Radio (NPR) show that features word games, puzzles and trivia. The show is recorded live in front of an audience In New York City, and is hosted by comedian Ophira Eisenberg.

6. Hosp. areas : ORS

Surgery (surg.) is usually performed in an operating room (OR).

7. Texter’s “Too funny!” : ROTFL

Rolling on the floor, laughing (ROTFL)

8. Semiannual astronomical event : EQUINOX

An equinox is a phenomenon dictated by the tilt of the earth’s axis. Twice every year, that tilt “evens out” and the sun is equidistant from points at the same latitude both north and south of the equator. It is as if the earth has no tilt relative to the sun. The term “equinox” comes from the Latin for “equal night”, inferring that night and day are equally long, as the effect of the earth’s “tilt” is nullified. Equinoxes occur each year around March 21st (the vernal equinox) and September 23rd (the autumnal equinox).

9. “C’mon, bro!” : DUDE!

Our term “dude” arose as slang in New York City in the 1880s, when it was used to describe a fastidious man. In the early 1900s, the term was extended to mean “city slickers”, easterners who vacationed in the West. The first use of the term “dude ranch” was recorded in 1921.

13. Going places? : TOILETS

Our word “toilet” comes into our vocabulary via a tortuous route from the Middle French “toile” meaning “cloth, net”. The French “toilette” is a diminutive of “toile”, and described a cloth or bag for clothes. From this usage, the English word “toilet” came to mean “fine cloth cover over a dressing table”, and the “the articles used in dressing”. From there, “toilet” described the act of dressing, and then a dressing room. By the early 1800s, a toilet was a dressing room that had a lavatory attached, and eventually the lavatory itself.

15. Thimble Theatre name : OYL

Popeye first appeared in 1929 in a comic strip called “Thimble Theatre”. The strip, created by E. C. Segar, ran for ten years before Popeye made an appearance. Popeye received such a great welcome from readers that he soon “took over” the strip, and eventually even hogged the strip’s title. Before Popeye turned up, Olive Oyl was the main character.

23. Lamp filler : KEROSENE

Kerosene is a mixture of hydrocarbons that is used mainly as a fuel. Kerosene is volatile, but is less flammable than gasoline. Over in the UK and Ireland, we call the same fuel “paraffin”.

24. 1950 story collection including “The Evitable Conflict” : I, ROBOT

Science fiction author Isaac Asimov wrote a marvelous collection of short stories called “I, Robot” that were first published together in 1950. In the stories, he makes repeated reference to the Three Laws of Robotics, which he introduced in the story “Runaround”, first published in 1942. The three laws are:

  1. A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
  2. A robot must obey the orders given it by human beings, except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.
  3. A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.

“Evitable” is a word meaning avoidable, describing something that can be avoided, something that is not foreordained, not predestined.

27. Voting Rights Act pres. : LBJ

The Voting Rights Act of 1965 was designed to enforce the voting rights guaranteed by the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments of the Constitution. Action was deemed necessary to counter widespread racial discrimination, which was a focus of the Civil Rights movement of the day.

29. Action movie pieces : UZIS

The first Uzi submachine gun was designed in the late 1940s by Major Uziel “Uzi” Gal of the Israel Defense Forces, who gave his name to the gun.

32. One of the original singers of “Can You Feel the Love Tonight” : NALA

In “The Lion King”, Nala is a lioness and the childhood friend of Simba. By the end of the story, Nala and Simba become wedded. “The Lion King” is inspired by William Shakespeare’s “Hamlet”, with Simba representing the title character, and Nala representing Hamlet’s love interest Ophelia.

“Can You Feel the Love Tonight” is a hit song from the 1994 movie “The Lion King” that was composed by Elton John with lyrics by Tim Rice. The song was performed by voice actors during the film, and Elton John reprised it during the movie credits.

34. Novel first credited to Currer Bell : JANE EYRE

The first work that any of the three Brontë sisters had in print was an 1846 collection of poetry that they published jointly. This first work was titled “Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell”, each using a male pen name. Charlotte Brontë published her novel “Jane Eyre” under the name Currer Bell. Emily Brontë followed soon after with “Wuthering Heights” published under the name Ellis Bell. The youngest sister, Anne Brontë, published “Agnes Grey” using the name Acton Bell.

37. Safety’s stat. : INT

That would be football.

44. Scott Lang, when in costume : ANT-MAN

In the Marvel universe, Ant-Man has been the superhero persona of three different fictional characters: Hank Pym, Scott Lang and Eric O’Grady. In the 2015 film “Ant-Man”, Michael Douglas plays Hank Pym, and Paul Rudd plays Scott Lang.

48. Newark’s county : ESSEX

Essex County, New Jersey is actually in the New York Metropolitan Area. The county seat is Newark.

50. Title for Sidious : DARTH

Palpatine is the Dark Lord of the Sith in the “Star Wars” universe. He is also known as “Darth Sidious” and “the Emperor”. In most of the films in the series, Palpatine is played by Scottish actor Ian McDiarmid. In “The Empire Strikes Back”, he was actually played by a woman, the wife of special makeup effects artist Rick Baker, and voiced by New Zealand actor Clive Revill.

52. “Superstore” airer : NBC

“Superstore” is a sitcom that started airing in 2015. It’s all about employees working at a fictional big-box store in St. Louis called Cloud 9.

53. Dash : ELAN

Our word “élan” was imported from French, in which language the word has a similar meaning to ours, i.e “style” or “flair”.

57. Record-setting Lady Vols basketball coach Summitt : PAT

Pat Summitt was a retired college basketball head coach. She coached the Tennessee Lady Vols team for 38 years starting in 1974. Sadly, Summitt stepped down in 2012 following a diagnosis of early-onset Alzheimer’s disease, and passed away in 2016.

The Tennessee Volunteers (the Vols) is the name given to the men’s sports teams at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. The women’s teams are called the Lady Volunteers.

59. “Shine a Little Love” band, to fans : ELO

The Electric Light Orchestra (ELO) is a symphonic rock group from the north of England.

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. “This is so humbling” : I’M HONORED
10. One skilled in moderation : HOST
14. Literally, “something for something” : QUID PRO QUO
16. “Once more __ the breach”: “Henry V” : UNTO
17. Backup : UNDERSTUDY
18. “Deadwood” actress Jewell : GERI
19. Chiller : ICE
20. Good kick : FIELD GOAL
22. Virginia senator Kaine : TIM
23. Firing site : KILN
25. “__ Meenie”: Kingston/Bieber hit : EENIE
26. Certain fisher : EELER
28. Not following anyone : OUT FRONT
31. New York home of the Himalayan Highlands : BRONX ZOO
33. Duck Hunt platform : NES
34. Southwestern plant whose oil is used in cosmetics : JOJOBA
36. “It’s out of my hands” : I TRIED
38. Rival of SEA and OAK : LAA
39. “Okay, here’s the deal” : SO LISTEN
41. Design that’s just over a foot : ANKLE TAT
43. “¿Cómo __?” : ESTAS
46. Back at the track : BET ON
47. Dali contemporary : SERT
49. Subtle signal : NOD
51. Coolidge is famous for it : TERSENESS
54. Sched. uncertainty : TBA
55. What contacts may help : EYES
56. Irreverent one : BLASPHEMER
60. Algonquian language : CREE
61. Drink with a croissant, maybe : CAFE AU LAIT
62. Toy truck name : HESS
63. What’s often on the following page : NEXT MONTH

Down

1. Short notice? : I QUIT!
2. Ball State University city : MUNCIE
3. Fugitive’s plea : HIDE ME!
4. Often flowery words : ODE
5. “Ask Me Another” co-producer : NPR
6. Hosp. areas : ORS
7. Texter’s “Too funny!” : ROTFL
8. Semiannual astronomical event : EQUINOX
9. “C’mon, bro!” : DUDE!
10. Affectionate sort : HUGGER
11. Interview, often : ONE-ON-ONE
12. Hardly harmonious : STRAINED
13. Going places? : TOILETS
15. Thimble Theatre name : OYL
21. Clear-cut, as for lumber : DEFOREST
23. Lamp filler : KEROSENE
24. 1950 story collection including “The Evitable Conflict” : I, ROBOT
27. Voting Rights Act pres. : LBJ
29. Action movie pieces : UZIS
30. Walk unsteadily : TOTTER
32. One of the original singers of “Can You Feel the Love Tonight” : NALA
34. Novel first credited to Currer Bell : JANE EYRE
35. Symbols of strength : OAK TREES
37. Safety’s stat. : INT
38. Test giver : LAB TECH
40. “You can come out now” : IT’S SAFE
42. They can be eaten or absorbed : LOSSES
44. Scott Lang, when in costume : ANT-MAN
45. “Very well” : SO BE IT
48. Newark’s county : ESSEX
50. Title for Sidious : DARTH
52. “Superstore” airer : NBC
53. Dash : ELAN
57. Record-setting Lady Vols basketball coach Summitt : PAT
58. Go smoothly : HUM
59. “Shine a Little Love” band, to fans : ELO

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