LA Times Crossword Answers 29 May 2018, Tuesday

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Constructed by: Ed Sessa
Edited by: Rich Norris

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Today’s Reveal Answer: Let’s Join Hands

Themed answers are in the format “X AND Y”, and each includes “HANDS” as a hidden word:

  • 48A. Exhortation to come together … and a hint to 20-, 24- and 42-Across : LET’S JOIN HANDS
  • 20A. Basic cocktail with Dewar’s : SCOTCH AND SODA
  • 24A. Live frugally : PINCH AND SCRAPE
  • 42A. Political entities subject to Constitutional separation : CHURCH AND STATE

Bill’s time: 5m 30s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

6. “Sí,” on the Seine : OUI

The Seine is the river that flows through Paris. The Seine empties into the English Channel to the north, at the port city of Le Havre.

9. Nasser of Egypt : GAMAL

Gamal Abdel Nasser was the second president of Egypt, from 1956 until he died in 1970. He stood alongside Muhammad Naguib, Egypt’s first president, during the Egyptian Revolution of 1952 that overthrew the ruling monarchy of Egypt and Sudan. Nasser was an advocate of Pan-Arabism, an ideology promoting unification of Arab peoples and countries. President Nasser went so far as forming the United Arab Republic (UAR), a union between Egypt and Syria that started in 1958 but fell apart in 1961 when Syria withdrew.

14. Oscar winner Marisa : TOMEI

Marisa Tomei’s first screen role was in the daytime soap “As the World Turns”, but her break came with a recurring role in “The Cosby Show” spin-off “A Different World”. Tomei won an Oscar for her delightful performance in “My Cousin Vinny” in 1992.

16. Martini garnish : OLIVE

The term “martini” probably takes it name from the “Martini & Rossi” brand of dry vermouth, although no one seems to be completely sure. What is clear is that despite the Martini name originating in Italy, the martini drink originated in the US. The original martini was made with gin and sweet vermouth, but someone specifying a “dry” martini was given gin and dry vermouth. Nowadays we use dry vermouth for all martinis and the term “dry” has become a reference to how little vermouth is included in the drink. Famously, Noël Coward liked his drink very dry and said that a perfect martini is made by “filling a glass with gin then waving it in the general direction of Italy”. The German-American journalist and satirist H. L. Mencken referred to the martini as “the only American invention as perfect as a sonnet”.

17. “The Sixth Sense” writer/director M. Night __ : SHYAMALAN

M. Night Shyamalan is an Indian-American screenwriter and film producer. Shyamalan has written and directed some great films, with my favorites being “The Sixth Sense” (1999), “Signs” (2002) and “The Village” (2004).

“The Sixth Sense” is a fabulous 1999 film written and directed by M. Night Shyamalan. I remember watching “The Sixth Sense” for the first time on an airplane. Shyamalan wasn’t well known for his famous surprise endings to films at that point. It was very gratifying to hear my fellow passengers join me in a big “gasp” at the appropriate point in the story …

19. “Mack the Knife” singer Bobby : DARIN

The singer Bobby Darin had a short but eventful life. Darin started in show business as a songwriter for Connie Francis. He then made it big as a performer with huge hits like “Splish Splash”, “Dream Lover”, “Mack the Knife” and “Beyond the Sea”. He was active politically as a supporter of Robert Kennedy, and was present in the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles when Kennedy was assassinated. Soon after, Darin found out that the people he thought were his parents, were in fact his grandparents. The woman he knew as his older sister was in fact his mother. Darin died following a heart operation at only 37 years old.

20. Basic cocktail with Dewar’s : SCOTCH AND SODA

Dewar’s is a blended Scotch whisky introduced to the market in 1846 by John Dewar. Dewar’s White Label is the company’s most popular Scotch. It was first sold in 1899, and with a taste that is described as “heather and honey”. Dewar’s also make some single malts, under the labels Aberfeldy 12 and Aberfeldy 21. Today, Dewar’s is owned by Bacardi.

31. What truants “play” : HOOKY

Apparently the term “hooky” comes from “hoekje”, the Dutch name for the game hide-and-seek. To play hooky is to shirk one’s responsibility, as in a schoolkid taking a day off without permission.

“Truant” is such a lovely word. We have been using it to describe someone who wanders from an appointed place since the mid-1400s. Prior to that, a truant was a beggar or a vagabond.

32. 2010 Apple release : IPAD

When Apple introduced the iPad in 2010, it wasn’t the company’s first foray into the world of tablet computing. Apple created great buzz by introducing the Newton MessagePad way back in 1993. This innovative machine was fraught with problems and really died a very slow death, finally being withdrawn from the market in 1998.

33. Application file suffix : EXE

In the Windows operating system, a file with the extension .exe is an “executable” file.

35. Pests in a pantry : ANTS

The word “pantry” dates back to 1300 when it came into English from the Old French “panetrie” meaning a “bread room”. Bread is “pain” in French, and “panis” in Latin.

38. Octopus octet : ARMS

The name “octopus” comes from the Greek for “eight-footed”. The most common plural used is “octopuses”, although the Greek plural form “octopodes” is also quite correct. The plural “octopi” isn’t really correct as the inference is that “octopus” is like a second-declension Latin noun, which it isn’t. That said, dictionaries are now citing “octopi” as an acceptable plural. Language does evolve, even though it drives me crazy …

41. Most of Wile E. Coyote’s gadgets, brand-wise : ACMES

The Acme Corporation is a fictional company used mainly by Looney Tunes, and within the Looney Tunes empire it is appears mostly in “Road Runner” cartoons. Wile E. Coyote is always receiving a new piece of gear from Acme designed to finally capture the Road Runner, but the equipment always leads to his downfall.

42. Political entities subject to Constitutional separation : CHURCH AND STATE

The phrase “(wall of) separation of church and state” is attributed to Thomas Jefferson, as he used it in an 1802 letter that he wrote to a group of Baptists from Danbury, Connecticut. Jefferson was referring to concepts called out in the First Amendment to the US Constitution. The text of that amendment is:

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

I’ve heard the argument made that separation of church and state is not called out in the Constitution, citing the fact that the phrase isn’t there. It’s true, the words “separation of church and state” aren’t used, but the First Amendment is still there.

46. Forget-me-__ : NOT

The plants known as forget-me-nots were given their distinctive name first in French, i.e. “ne m’oubliez pas”. “Forget-me-not” is simply a translation into English.

47. Ohio border lake : ERIE

Lake Erie borders four US states (Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York and Michigan) and one Canadian province (Ontario).

54. Hawaiian hi : ALOHA

The Hawaiian word “aloha” has many meanings in English: affection, love, peace, compassion and mercy. More recently, “aloha” has come to mean “hello” and “goodbye”, but only since the mid-1800s.

58. Bourbon Street cuisine : CAJUN

Cajun cuisine is named for the French-speaking Acadian people who were deported from Acadia in Canada to Louisiana in the 18th century.

When New Orleans was founded by the French, the House of Bourbon was ruling France. Bourbon Street was named in its honor.

59. Boston skyscraper, with “the” : PRU

“The Pru” is the familiar name given to the Prudential Tower in Boston. It is currently the second highest building in the city, after the John Hancock Tower. However, if one includes the height of the radio tower on its roof, then it is the highest building in Boston. When it was completed in 1964, the Pru was the tallest building in the country outside of New York City.

60. Nick of “Cape Fear” : NOLTE

The actor Nick Nolte got his big break playing opposite Jacqueline Bisset and Robert Shaw in “The Deep”, released in 1976. Prior to that, he had worked as a model. Nolte appeared in a magazine advertisement for Clairol in 1972 alongside fellow model and future actor Sigourney Weaver.

The 1991 film called “Cape Fear” is a Martin Scorsese remake of a 1962 movie of the same name. The 1991 version stars Robert De Niro and Nick Nolte, and there are also cameo appearances by Robert Mitchum and Gregory Peck who starred in the 1962 original.

62. Stockholm airline : SAS

SAS was formerly known as Scandinavian Airlines System and is the flag carrier of three countries: Denmark, Norway and Sweden. SAS is based at Stockholm Arlanda Airport located just north of the Swedish capital.

Down

1. @ signs : ATS

The “at symbol” (@) originated in the commercial word, as shorthand for “each at, per” and similar phrases. I suppose we see the symbol most commonly these days as part of email addresses.

2. “I am so stupid!” : D’OH!

“The Simpsons” is one of the most successful programs produced by the Fox Broadcasting Company. Homer Simpson’s catchphrase is “D’oh!”, which became such a famous exclamation that it has been included in the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) since 2001. “D’oh!” can be translated as “I should have thought of that!”

3. Actress Poehler and singer Grant : AMYS

Amy Poehler was a cast member on “Saturday Night Live” from 2001 to 2008, notable for appearing in many great sketches, including those where she played Hillary Clinton opposite Tina Fey’s Sarah Palin. Poehler also starred with Fey in the 2008 movie “Baby Mama”. And, Poehler led the cast of the sitcom “Parks and Recreation” for its seven-season run.

Amy Grant is known as “The Queen of Christian Pop” and her most famous songs are Gospel and Contemporary Christian works. Grant recorded two songs that made it to number one in the commercial charts: “The Next Time I Fall” (1981, duet with Peter Cetera) and “Baby Baby” (1991).

4. Birds with eyelike spots on their tails : PEACOCKS

The female peafowl, the peahen, has very dull plumage compared to the extravagant display on the tail of the peacock.

5. Youngest-ever Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner Hutton : TIMOTHY

Timothy Hutton won his Academy Award for his supporting role in the 1980 film “Ordinary People”. He was 20 years old when he received that Oscar, making him the youngest recipient in the Best Supporting Actor category. Timothy dedicated his award to his Dad, actor Jim Hutton who was best known for playing Ellery Queen in the seventies TV show of the same name. Timothy Hutton has been married twice, to high-profile women. He was husband to actress Debra Winger from 1986 to 1990, and to Aurore Giscard d’Estaing (niece of former French president Valéry Giscard d’Estaing) from 2001 to 2009.

7. D-Day beach : UTAH

The Normandy landings on D-Day in 1944 took place along a 50-mile stretch of the Normandy coast divided into five sectors: Utah, Omaha, Gold, Juno and Sword. The worst fighting by far took place on Omaha Beach, a sector assigned to the US Army that was transported by elements of the US Navy and the Royal Navy.

8. Hebrides isle : IONA

Although the small island of Iona lies just off the west coast of Scotland, it was the site of a monastery built in the Middle Ages by a monk from Ireland names Colm Cille (also known as Columba). Colm Cille and his followers were sent into exile from the Irish mainland and settled in Iona, as at that time the island was part of an Irish kingdom. This monastery in Iona expanded its influence over the decades and founded other institutions all over Ireland and Great Britain. It is believed that the famous Book of Kells may have been written, or at least started, at the monastery on Iona. Iona is also the burial site for Macbeth, King of Scotland who was immortalized in Shakespeare’s fictional account of the king’s life.

The Hebrides is a group of islands just off the west coast of Scotland. The Hebrides are divided into two main groups: the Inner and Outer Hebrides.

9. NASA’s __ Space Flight Center : GODDARD

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland was NASA’s first space flight center and opened in 1959. It was named for American engineer Robert H. Goddard, who created and built the world’s first liquid-fueled rocket.

10. Where Nome is : ALASKA

In 1899, the Alaska city of Nome was briefly known as Anvil City by locals to avoid confusion with the nearby city of Cape Nome. However, the US Post Office refused to approve the change, and so the name was immediately changed back to Nome.

11. Surrealist painter Joan : MIRO

Joan Miró was a Spanish artist. Miro immersed himself in Surrealism, so much so that Andre Breton, the founder of the movement, said that Miro was “the most Surrealist of us all”.

12. Gung-ho : AVID

“Kung ho” is a Chinese expression meaning “work together, cooperate”. The anglicized version “gung-ho” was adopted by a Major Evans Carlson as an expression of combined spirit for his 2nd Marine Raider Battalion during WWII. From there the term spread throughout the Marine Corps and back to America where it persists to this day.

13. “Girls” creator Dunham : LENA

Lena Dunham is a co-star in the HBO series “Girls”, and is also the show’s creator. Dunham garnered a lot of attention for herself during the 2012 US Presidential election cycle as she starred in an ad focused on getting out the youth vote. In the spot, she compared voting for the first time with having sex for the first time.

18. Gillette blade : ATRA

Fortunately for crossword constructors, the Atra was introduced by Gillette in 1977, as the first razor with a pivoting head. The Atra was sold as the Contour in some markets and its derivative products are still around today.

24. Cool, in ’90s slang : PHAT

In hip-hop circles, the term “phat” means “excellent, first-rate”.

25. Greek column type : IONIC

The Ionic was one of the three classical orders of architecture, the others being the Doric and the Corinthian. An Ionic column is relatively ornate. It usually has grooves running up and down its length and at the top there is a “scroll” design called a “volute”. The scroll motif makes Ionic columns popular for the design of academic buildings. The term “Ionic” means “pertaining to Ionia”, with Ionia being an ancient territory that is located in modern-day Turkey.

27. Football’s “Iron Mike” : DITKA

Mike Ditka is a retired NFL player, and retired coach of Chicago Bears and New Orleans Saints. Ditka and Tom Flores are the only people to have won Super Bowls as a player, an assistant coach, and as a head coach.

29. Prefix with frost : PERMA-

Permafrost is by definition soil that has been below the freezing point of water for two years or more. Usually permafrost is covered by a thin layer of soil that thaws during the warmer months and which can sustain life. Plants can grow in the active layer, but their roots cannot penetrate the permafrost below.

30. Ron Darling or Tom Seaver : EX-MET

Ron Darling is former Major league Baseball pitcher. Darling retired from the game in 1995, and starting working as a color commentator for TBS in 2007.

Tom Seaver is a former baseball pitcher, noted for his ten-year stint with the New York Mets from 1967 to 1977. Seaver earned the nickname “Tom Terrific”, and is the only Met player to have his jersey number retired. When he quit baseball he moved out here to California and opened up a small winery in Calistoga. Keep an eye out for the vineyard’s name, “Seaver Family Vineyards”, and their cabernets “Nancy’s Fancy” and “GTS”.

34. To be, to Livy : ESSE

Titus Livius (aka “Livy”) was a Roman historian who lived from 59 BC to AD 17. Livy wrote the definitive history of Rome at that time.

36. De __: actual : FACTO

Conceptually, “de jure” and “de facto” are related terms, one meaning “concerning, according to law”, and the other meaning “concerning, according to fact”. There is an example of the use of the two terms together from my homeland of Ireland. According to our constitution, Irish is the first language of the country, and yet almost everyone in the country uses English as his or her first language. One might say that Irish is the de jure first language, but English is the first language de facto.

40. Some “Iliad” warriors : TROJANS

The ancient city of Troy was located on the west coast of modern-day Turkey. The Trojan War of Greek mythology was precipitated by the elopement of Helen, the wife of the king of Sparta, with Paris of Troy. The war itself largely consisted of a nine-year siege of Troy by the Greeks. We know most about the final year of that siege, as it is described extensively in Homer’s “Iliad”. The city eventually fell when the Greeks hid soldiers inside the Trojan Horse, which the Trojans brought inside the city’s walls. Beware of Greeks bearing gifts …

41. Utterly absurd : ASININE

The adjective “asinine” means “stupid, obstinate”, and comes from the Latin for “like an ass”.

44. Indian political family : NEHRUS

Jawaharlal Nehru was the very first prime minister of India, serving from 1947-64. Nehru was basically the heir to his mentor Mahatma Gandhi. Nehru’s only daughter Indira, also became prime minister (known as Indira Gandhi through marriage, though she was no relation to Mahatma).

49. Splashy style : ELAN

Our word “élan” was imported from French, in which language the word has a similar meaning to ours, i.e “style” or “flair”.

50. Axis dictator who ordered the Pearl Harbor attack : TOJO

Hideki Tojo was a general and the Prime Minister of Japan during most of WWII. Although the attack on Pearl Harbor was planned before he took office, Tojo was the Prime Minister who made the decision to declare war on the US. After Japan surrendered, General MacArthur ordered Tojo’s arrest. Tojo attempted to commit suicide by shooting himself in the heart, but missed. There is a story that while recovering, Tojo was given a set of replacement dentures that were made by an American dentist. Apparently the dentist drilled the message “Remember Pearl Harbor” into the teeth in Morse code. Tojo was hanged for war crimes in 1948.

Before WWII, Hungary’s prime minister was lobbying for an alliance between Germany, Hungary and Italy and worked towards such a relationship that he called an “axis”. The main Axis powers during the war were Germany, Italy and Japan. However, also included in the relationship were Romania, Bulgaria and the aforementioned Hungary.

52. “Julie & Julia” director Ephron : NORA

Nora Ephron had many talents, including writing film scripts and novels. Many of the movies that she wrote, she also directed. These would include some of my favorite movies of all time like “Sleepless in Seattle”, “You’ve Got Mail” and most recently, the wonderful “Julie & Julia”. And, did you know that Nora Ephron’s second marriage was to journalist Carl Bernstein of Watergate fame? She wrote an autobiographical novel based on her life with Bernstein, which deals in particular with Bernstein’s affair with the daughter of British Prime Minister James Callaghan.

“Julie & Julia” is a wonderful 2009 Nora Ephron film that juxtaposes the lives of celebrity chef Julia Childs and home cook/blogger Julie Powell. Childs is played by Meryl Streep, and Powell by Amy Adams. Ephron’s screenplay is based on two nonfiction books: Child’s autobiography “My Life in France”, and Powell’s memoir “Julie and Julia: My Year of Cooking Dangerously”. Highly recommended …

53. Grain tower : SILO

“Silo” is a Spanish word that we absorbed into English. The term ultimately derives from the Greek “siros”, which described a pit in which one kept corn.

56. Flight board abbr. : ETD

Estimated time of departure (ETD)

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Learn to fit in : ADAPT
6. “Sí,” on the Seine : OUI
9. Nasser of Egypt : GAMAL
14. Oscar winner Marisa : TOMEI
15. “What was __ expect?” : I TO
16. Martini garnish : OLIVE
17. “The Sixth Sense” writer/director M. Night __ : SHYAMALAN
19. “Mack the Knife” singer Bobby : DARIN
20. Basic cocktail with Dewar’s : SCOTCH AND SODA
22. Spanish “other” : OTRA
23. Acorn producer : OAK
24. Live frugally : PINCH AND SCRAPE
31. What truants “play” : HOOKY
32. 2010 Apple release : IPAD
33. Application file suffix : EXE
35. Pests in a pantry : ANTS
36. Like very serious errors : FATAL
38. Octopus octet : ARMS
39. Muscle spasm : TIC
40. Chore : TASK
41. Most of Wile E. Coyote’s gadgets, brand-wise : ACMES
42. Political entities subject to Constitutional separation : CHURCH AND STATE
46. Forget-me-__ : NOT
47. Ohio border lake : ERIE
48. Exhortation to come together … and a hint to 20-, 24- and 42-Across : LET’S JOIN HANDS
54. Hawaiian hi : ALOHA
55. Embarrasses deeply : MORTIFIES
58. Bourbon Street cuisine : CAJUN
59. Boston skyscraper, with “the” : PRU
60. Nick of “Cape Fear” : NOLTE
61. Shoelace problems : KNOTS
62. Stockholm airline : SAS
63. Wear away : ERODE

Down

1. @ signs : ATS
2. “I am so stupid!” : D’OH!
3. Actress Poehler and singer Grant : AMYS
4. Birds with eyelike spots on their tails : PEACOCKS
5. Youngest-ever Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner Hutton : TIMOTHY
6. Lube shop container : OILCAN
7. D-Day beach : UTAH
8. Hebrides isle : IONA
9. NASA’s __ Space Flight Center : GODDARD
10. Where Nome is : ALASKA
11. Surrealist painter Joan : MIRO
12. Gung-ho : AVID
13. “Girls” creator Dunham : LENA
18. Gillette blade : ATRA
21. Diet-friendly : NO-CAL
24. Cool, in ’90s slang : PHAT
25. Greek column type : IONIC
26. V-shaped cut : NOTCH
27. Football’s “Iron Mike” : DITKA
28. Place for a waxing : SPA
29. Prefix with frost : PERMA-
30. Ron Darling or Tom Seaver : EX-MET
34. To be, to Livy : ESSE
36. De __: actual : FACTO
37. Campfire remnant : ASH
38. Represented : ACTED FOR
40. Some “Iliad” warriors : TROJANS
41. Utterly absurd : ASININE
43. Left open, as a door : UNSHUT
44. Indian political family : NEHRUS
45. “Dagnabbit!” : DRAT!
48. Absence : LACK
49. Splashy style : ELAN
50. Axis dictator who ordered the Pearl Harbor attack : TOJO
51. Little rascals : IMPS
52. “Julie & Julia” director Ephron : NORA
53. Grain tower : SILO
56. Flight board abbr. : ETD
57. “Just like I said!” : SEE?!

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