LA Times Crossword Answers 10 Jun 2018, Sunday

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Constructed by: Pawel Fludzinski
Edited by: Rich Norris

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Today’s Theme: Seabees

Themed answers comprise two words starting with the letters CB:

  • 24A. Subject of an 1857 Elizabeth Gaskell biography : CHARLOTTE BRONTE
  • 40A. Organization that really counts : CENSUS BUREAU
  • 57A. Tribute group : COVER BAND
  • 78A. Microbrewery choice : CRAFT BEER
  • 96A. Bletchley Park analysts : CODEBREAKERS
  • 109A. Ghee, e.g. : CLARIFIED BUTTER
  • 3D. Team that hasn’t won a Super Bowl in its 50-year existence : CINCINNATI BENGALS
  • 13D. It’s seen on carousels : CHECKED BAGGAGE
  • 37D. Amateur sport since 1893 : COLLEGE BASKETBALL
  • 51D. Perp processing area : CENTRAL BOOKING

Bill’s time: 19m 56s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Scrabble accessories : RACKS

The game of Scrabble has been around since 1938, the invention of an architect named Alfred Mosher Butts. Butts determined how many tiles of each letter, and the point value of each tile, by analyzing letter distributions in publications like “The New York Times”.

6. Long-grained rice : BASMATI

Basmati is a long grain rice that is commonly used in Indian and Pakistani cuisine. The name “basmati” comes from the Sanskrit word “vasmati” meaning “fragrant”. I am a big fan …

13. Cajun crustacean : CRAWDAD

“Crawdad” and “crawfish” are alternative names for crayfish, with “crawdad” being more common in the south of the country.

20. Target reader of a series of guides, facetiously : IDIOT

The “Complete Idiot’s Guides” is a series of how-to books published by Alpha Books of Indianapolis.

21. Odysseus, e.g. : ITHACAN

Ithaca is a Greek island in the Ionian Sea. The island features in Homer’s “Odyssey” as it was the home of the mythological hero Odysseus, who was Ithaca’s king.

24. Subject of an 1857 Elizabeth Gaskell biography : CHARLOTTE BRONTE

Charlotte Brontë was the eldest of the three Brontë sister authors. Charlotte’s most famous work is the novel “Jane Eyre”, which she published under the pen name Currer Bell. The pen name veiled her gender, but preserved the initials of her real name. After “Jane Eyre” was published, Brontë started to move in the same circles as other successful novelists of the day, including William Makepeace Thackeray and Elizabeth Gaskell. Just two years after Bronte died in her late thirties, it was Gaskell who published the first biography of Charlotte Brontë.

Elizabeth Gaskell was an English novelist in the Victorian Era. Born Elizabeth Stevenson, she launched her career as an author after marrying Unitarian minister William Gaskell. To this day, Elizabeth is often referred to as “Mrs. Gaskell”, even when discussing her work. Gaskell’s best-known novels are “Cranford”, “North and South” and “Wives and Daughters”.

27. Really enjoy, with “in” : BASK

Our verb “to bask”, meaning “to expose one to pleasant warmth”, is derived from the gruesome 14th-century term “basken”, meaning “to wallow in blood”. The contemporary usage apparently originated with Shakespeare, who employed “bask” with reference to sunshine in “As You Like It”.

28. ’80s police show partner : LACEY

The actress Tyne Daly really came into the public eye playing Detective Lacey in “Cagney and Lacey”. From 1999 to 2005, Daly played the mother of the title character in the TV show “Judging Amy”.

35. Generous limit? : SKY

The sky’s the limit.

36. “I’m __”: “Dragnet” line : A COP

The TV detective show “Dragnet” opened up each episode with lines spoken by the character Sergeant Joe Friday:

This is the city, Los Angeles, California, I work here. I’m a cop.

In later series, the phrase “I’m a cop” was replaced with “I carry a badge”.

40. Organization that really counts : CENSUS BUREAU

The original census was taken during the days of the Roman Republic, and was a reckoning of all adult males who were fit for military service. The first US Census was taken in 1790, and was conducted by federal marshals.

45. Tearjerker need : HANKIE

A kerchief is a triangular or square piece of cloth used as a covering for the head. So, a handkerchief (“hand-kerchief”) is a square piece of cloth held in the hand and used for personal hygiene.

48. Nautical time units : BELLS

On board a seagoing vessel, there is a system of watches that defines which specific compliment of the crew is on duty. Most of the watches last for four hours (the exception are the two dog watches, that last for two hours each). During each watch, the ship’s bell is sounded every 30 minutes, starting with “one bell” thirty minutes into the watch, and finishing with eight bells that signals the end of the watch.

49. Actor Morales : ESAI

The actor Esai Morales is best known in the world of film for the 1987 movie “La Bamba”, which depicted the life of Ritchie Valens and his half-brother Bob Morales (played by Esai). On the small screen, Morales plays Lt. Tony Rodriguez on “NYPD Blue” and Joseph Adama on “Caprica”.

52. Mojito flavoring : LIME

A mojito is a Cuban cocktail, although the exact origins appear to be unclear, as does the derivation of the name. Want one? Put 4 mint leaves in a glass, and add the juice of half a lime and a teaspoon of powdered sugar. Muddle the ingredients, smashing them together with a muddler or a spoon. Add some crushed ice, two ounces of white rum and stir. Top with a couple of ounces of club soda, and garnish with a sprig of mint and/or a slice of lime. Cheers!

60. Gill openings : SLITS

A fish’s gills are the organs equivalent to the lungs of many land animals. The gills can extract oxygen dissolved in water and excrete carbon dioxide.

62. Like the Valkyries : NORSE

In Norse mythology, the valkyries are beautiful female attendants of Odin who choose those who must die in battle and those who must live. Half of those who die go to Fólkvangr, the “army field” ruled over by the goddess Freyja. The other half of those who perish go to Valhalla, the hall of the slain that is ruled over by the god Odin. The etymology of “valkyrie” is Old Norse for “chooser of the slain”.

64. “No Limit Top __”: 1999 rap album : DOGG

“No Limit Top Dogg” is a 1999 album by rap artist Snoop Dogg.

The rap star Snoop Dogg’s real name is Cordozar Calvin Broadus. He is the most famous protege of the notorious rapper Dr. Dre. Sadly, Snoop Dogg has had numerous run-ins with police all round the world, even after he started to live the good life that came with his fame. Snoop Dogg has also been known as “Snoop Doggy Dogg”, and more recently as “Snoop Lion”.

68. Teddies, e.g. : LINGERIE

“Lingerie” is a French term. As used in France, it just means any underwear, worn by either males or females. In English we use “lingerie” to describe alluring underclothing worn by women. The term “lingerie” comes into English via the French word “linge” meaning “washables”, and ultimately from the Latin “linum”, meaning “linen”. We tend not to pronounce the word correctly in English, either here in the US or across the other side of the Atlantic. The French pronunciation is more like “lan-zher-ee”, as opposed to “lon-zher-ay” (American) and “lon-zher-ee” (British).

The item of lingerie known as a teddy can also be called “camiknickers”. The alternative name was used when the one-piece garment was introduced in the twenties, a combination of a camisole and panties (aka “knickers”).

70. Seehorn of “Better Call Saul” : RHEA

Rhea Seehorn is an actress best known for playing lawyer Kim Wexler in the TV crime drama “Better Call Saul”.

72. Diamond stats : ERAS

Earned run average (ERA)

73. R&B singer __ Marie : TEENA

Teena Marie was a very successful R&B singer who was born Mary Christine Brockert in Santa Monica, California.

74. __ Dumbledore, Hogwarts headmaster : ALBUS

Professor Albus Dumbledore is the headmaster of the school for wizards called Hogwarts, in the Harry Potter universe. Dumbledore’s specialties are nonverbal spells and alchemy. Author J. K. Rowling chose the name Dumbledore as it is an Early English word for a bumblebee. Apparently she pictured him wandering around, humming to himself.

80. Play date : GIG

Musicians use “gig” to describe a job, a performance. The term originated in the early 1900s in the world of jazz. The derivative phrase “gig economy” applies to a relatively recent phenomenon where workers find themselves jumping from temporary job to temporary job, from gig to gig.

82. RSA ruling party : ANC

The African National Congress (ANC) started out as the South African Native National Congress in 1912 with the goal of improving the lot of black South Africans. After years of turmoil, the ANC came to power in the first open election in 1964.

Republic of South Africa (RSA)

85. Logician’s “E” : ERAT

The initialism “QED” is used at the end of a mathematical proof or a philosophical argument. QED stands for the Latin “quod erat demonstrandum” meaning “that which was to be demonstrated”.

86. Either of baseball’s Griffeys : KEN

Ken Griffey, Jr. is noted as a home run hitter as well as a defensive player. In fact, Griffey is tied for the record for the most consecutive games with a home run. “Junior” is the son of Ken Griffey, Sr. who played professional baseball from 1973 to 1971. In fact, the Griffeys became the first father and son to play on the same Major League Baseball team, when they turned out together for the Seattle Mariners in 1990.

87. Food stamp? : USDA

The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) classifies meat into eight different grades:

  • Prime
  • Choice
  • Select
  • Standard
  • Commercial
  • Utility
  • Cutter
  • Canner

89. “The Godfather” catchphrase : BADA-BING

James Caan ad-libbed the phrase “bada-bing” when portraying Sonny in the classic 1972 film “The Godfather”. Years later, the writers of the TV mobster series “The Sopranos” used the name “Bada Bing!” for the fictional strip club in which Tony Soprano hangs out with his cronies.

94. Rockefeller, e.g. : OIL BARON

John D. Rockefeller was an American industrialist whose biggest success came with the Standard Oil Company that he ran for over 25 years. Rockefeller became the richest man in the world, and America’s first billionaire.

96. Bletchley Park analysts : CODEBREAKERS

Bletchley Park was a major codebreaking center during World War II used by the British, and ultimately the Allied Powers. It was at Bletchley Park where messages encoded by the German Enigma machines were broken. I visited Bletchley a few years ago, and found it to be a very cool place …

98. Trueheart of comics : TESS

In the “Dick Tracy” comic strip, Tess Trueheart was Dick’s love interest and later his wife (and still his love interest, I am sure!).

99. Bass ending : -OON

Our modern bassoon first appeared in the 1800s and has had a place in the concert orchestra ever since.

100. Business bigwig : EXEC

A bigwig is someone important. The use of the term harks back to the days when men of authority and rank wore … big wigs.

101. Worshiping figure : ORANT

An orant is a gesture made during some Christian services. It is the name given to the pose with the hands raised, set apart, and palms facing outwards. The term can also be used for someone holding such a pose. There are many examples of such poses found in early Christian art. The term comes from the Latin “orare” meaning “to pray”.

102. One of a deck’s pair : JOKER

Playing cards, in various forms, have been around for centuries and were probably invented in China. The Joker card is an American invention, appearing first in the late 1860s. The Joker was introduced as a card for the game of Euchre, and the suggestion is that the term “Joker” comes from “Juker” or “Juckerspiel”, the original German name for Euchre.

104. “Star Trek” villain : KHAN

In the 1982 movie “Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan” William Shatner played James T. Kirk, and the evil Khan was played by Ricardo Montalbán. Leonard Nimoy didn’t want to appear in the sequel, and only agreed to do so when the producers agreed to “kill off” Spock at the end of the story (but he comes back … and back … and back …).

106. Scottish resort town known for its whisky : OBAN

Oban is a seaport on the west coast of Scotland. It is home to the Oban distillery, a relatively small but famous distillery that was founded in 1794. It is actually older than the town, which grew up around the distillery.

109. Ghee, e.g. : CLARIFIED BUTTER

Ghee is clarified butter used in South Asian cuisines. “Ghee” comes from Sanskrit, and translates as “sprinkled”.

116. Low area : SWALE

A swale is a narrow tract of low-lying land that is usually wet or marshy. A swale can be naturally occurring or man-made. One might create a swale to help manage drainage of adjacent land.

118. Big wardrobe : ARMOIRE

“Armoire” is the French word for “wardrobe”, and is used for a standing closet that stores clothes.

120. Salad choice : ICEBERG

Iceberg lettuce is the most popular lettuce consumed in the US. Also known as “crisphead”, it is considered by many experts to be one of least flavorful varieties of lettuce available. I agree …

121. Low-quality material, idiomatically : SOW’S EAR

The old proverb “you can’t make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear” was apparently coined by English clergyman Stephen Gross in his 1579 story “Ephemerides”. Gosson wrote therein “Seekinge too make a silke purse of a Sowes eare.”

Down

1. Bad guy in the song “Copacabana” : RICO

The Copacabana of the 1978 Barry Manilow song is the Copacabana nightclub in New York City (which is also the subject of the Frank Sinatra song “Meet Me at the Copa”). The Copa opened in 1940 and is still going today although it is struggling. The club had to move due to impending construction and is now “sharing” a location with the Columbus 72 nightclub.

His name was Rico
He wore a diamond
He was escorted to his chair, he saw Lola dancing there
And when she finished, he called her over
But Rico went a bit to far
Tony sailed across the bar
And then the punches flew and chairs were smashed in two
There was blood and a single gun shot
But just who shot who?

2. Month before Nisan : ADAR

Nisan is the first month in the Hebrew ecclesiastical calendar, the month in which Passover falls. Adar is the last month in the same calendar, and is the month that includes the holiday of Purim.

3. Team that hasn’t won a Super Bowl in its 50-year existence : CINCINNATI BENGALS

The NFL’s Cincinnati Bengals team was founded in 1966 as a member of the American Football League (AFL). There was an earlier team called the Bengals in the city that played from 1937 to 1941. That team used the “Bengal” name because Cincinnati Zoo was home to a very rare Bengal tiger.

4. Brando’s “A Streetcar Named Desire” role : KOWALSKI

“Desire” is the name of a neighborhood in New Orleans, a destination for a streetcar line. The name “Desire” appears on the front of streetcars bound for that neighborhood, hence the title of the 1947 Tennessee Williams play “A Streetcar Named Desire”.

Actor Marlon Brando really hit the big time with his Oscar-winning performance in the 1951 movie “A Streetcar Named Desire”. Brando went on to win another Best Actor Oscar for his performance in 1972’s “The Godfather”, which gave him the platform to establish himself as a political activist. He turned down the award and didn’t attend the ceremony. Instead he sent a Native American rights activist called Sacheen Littlefeather who made a speech protesting the depiction of Native Americans in Hollywood movies. Brando wasn’t the first person to refuse an Oscar. George C. Scott did the same thing when he won for playing the title role in 1970’s “Patton”. Scott just didn’t like the whole idea of “competing” with other actors.

5. Chateau __ Michelle winery : STE

Chateau Ste. Michelle is a winery in Woodinville, Washington in the Columbia Valley. Chateau Ste. Michelle produces so much Riesling wine that it is the number-one Riesling producer in the world in terms of number of bottles.

6. Antacid option : BICARB

“Bicarb” is a familiar term for sodium bicarbonate. Another name for the same compound is “baking soda”. When sodium carbonate is added to a batter, it reacts with acids and releases carbon dioxide which gives baked goods texture, all those “holes”.

7. Olympians, e.g.: Abbr. : ATHS

Athlete (ath.)

8. One-named Colombian singer : SHAKIRA

Shakira is a hugely successful singer from Colombia. She used to appear on TV as one of the coaches on the reality show “The Voice”.

10. Often-injured knee part, briefly : ACL

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of four major ligaments that support the knee.

11. Confucian path : TAO

The name of the Chinese character “tao” translates as “path”, but the concept of Taoism signifies the true nature of the world.

The sayings of the Chinese philosopher Confucius (anglicized from “K’ung Fu-Tse”) are collected in a work called “The Analects” or “Linyu”. It wasn’t Confucius who wrote down his thoughts though, but rather his pupils, some 40 or so years after his death in 479 BC.

12. IOC part: Abbr. : INTL

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) was founded in 1894, and has its headquarters in Lausanne, Switzerland.

13. It’s seen on carousels : CHECKED BAGGAGE

Apparently, the baggage carousel was developed by a French company. The first installation was in Paris Orly Airport in the 1950s.

16. One of many Seuss village residents : WHO

The Whos live in Whoville in Dr. Seuss’ children’s book “How the Grinch Stole Christmas!”

18. Product, say: Abbr. : AMT

That would be the product of two numbers multiplied together.

19. Capital of Denmark? : DEE

The first letter in the word “Denmark” is a capital letter D (dee).

25. Nice cup? : TASSE

The French city of Nice is on the Mediterranean coast in the southeast of the country. Although Nice is only the fifth most populous city in France, it is home to the busiest airport outside of Paris. That’s because of all the tourists flocking to the French Riviera.

36. Fashion model Wek : ALEK

Alek Wek is a supermodel originally from Southern Sudan. In her native language, Wek’s name translates as “Black Spotted Cow”, which is a symbol of good luck for the Dinka, her native people.

40. Mating game : CHESS

In the game of chess, when the king is under immediate threat of capture it is said to be “in check”. If the king cannot escape from check, then the game ends in “checkmate” and the player in check loses. In the original Sanskrit game of chess, the king could actually be captured. Then a rule was introduced requiring that a warning be given if capture was imminent (today we announce “check!”) so that an accidental and early ending to the game doesn’t occur.

41. Flip chart holder : EASEL

The word “easel” comes from an old Dutch word meaning “donkey” would you believe? The idea is that an easel carries its load (an oil painting, say) just as a donkey would be made to carry a load.

42. Roswell sighting : UFO

The Roswell UFO Incident took place in 1947. Some people believe that an extraterrestrial spacecraft crashed, with aliens aboard. After the initial reports the public accepted the US Military’s explanation of the crash, that the debris recovered belonged to an experimental high-altitude surveillance balloon. The whole incident was dug up again over 30 years later when a claim was made that there was a cover-up in 1947, and that the armed forces had recovered an alien craft and brought it to Roswell Army Air Field. “The National Enquirer” ran the story, and it has been running ever since.

44. Sequence sung like “Twinkle twinkle” : ABCD

“The Alphabet Song” was copyrighted in 1835 in the US. The tune that goes with the words is the French folk song “Ah! vous dirai-je, Maman”, used by Mozart for a set of piano variations. The same tune is used for the nursery rhyme “Twinkle Twinkle Little Star”.

51. Perp processing area : CENTRAL BOOKING

Perpetrator (perp)

54. Sylvie’s seraph : ANGE

A seraph is a celestial being found in Hebrew and Christian writings. The word “seraph” (plural “seraphim”) literally translates as “burning one”. Seraphs are the highest-ranking angels in the Christian tradition, and the fifth-ranking of ten in the Jewish tradition.

56. “It __”: formal self-identification : IS I

The much debated statement “it is I” is actually grammatically correct, and should not be “corrected” to “it is me”. Traditionally, pronouns following linking verbs, such as “is”, “appear” and “seem”, are written in the nominative case. Examples are:

  • It is I (who called)
  • It was he (who did it)
  • It is we (who care)

58. Cold War capital : BONN

After WWII, Bonn was chosen as the capital of West Germany. That choice was promoted by Chancellor Konrad Adenauer who was from the area. After German reunification, the capital was moved to Berlin.

63. “Frozen” snowman : OLAF

In the 2013 animated film “Frozen”, Olaf is a happy-go-lucky snowman who provides a lot of comic relief in the movie. Olaf is voiced by actor and comedian Josh Gad.

67. Evening on Etna : SERA

Mount Etna on the island of Sicily is the largest of three active volcanoes in Italy, and indeed the largest of all active volcano in Europe. Etna is about 2 1/2 times the height of its equally famous sister, Mt. Vesuvius. Mt. Etna is home to a 110-km long narrow-gauge railway, and two ski resorts.

68. Small fishing boat concern : LEE TIDE

A leeward tide (sometime “lee tide”) is one that runs in the same direction that the wind is blowing. A windward tide, on the other hand, runs in the opposite direction to the wind. I think that the main danger with a lee tide is when a boat is at anchor. If the tide and wind are acting in concert, then the anchor is more likely to slip.

71. Bum : HEINIE

The slang term “heinie”, meaning “rear end”, is probably a contraction of “hind end”.

75. Over-__: sports wager : UNDER

An over-under bet is a wager that a number will be over or under a particular value. A common over-under bet is made on the combined points scored by two teams in a game.

76. Boatloads : SCADS

The origin of the word “scads”, meaning “lots and lots”, is unclear. That said, “scads” was used to mean “dollars” back in the mid-1800s.

78. Michael of “Arrested Development” : CERA

Michael Cera is a Canadian actor who played great characters on the TV show “Arrested Development”, and in the 2007 comedy-drama “Juno”. Cera is also quite the musician. He released an indie folk album titled “True That” in 2014.

“Arrested Development” is a sitcom that originally aired on Fox from 2003 to 2006. Ron Howard was heavily involved in the show behind the camera, serving as executive producer and also as the show’s narrator. Fifteen new episodes of “Arrested Development” were filmed specifically for release on Netflix in 2013, and there may even be a movie on the way.

84. Claim to call : DIBS

The phrase “to have dibs on” expresses a claim on something. Apparently, the term “dibs” is a contraction of “dibstone”, which was a knucklebone or jack used in a children’s game.

86. Erstwhile CIA rival : KGB

The “Komitet gosudarstvennoy bezopasnosti” (KGB) was the national security agency of the Soviet Union until 1991. The KGB was dissolved after the agency’s chairman led a failed attempt at a coup d’état designed to depose President Mikhail Gorbachev.

“Erst” is an archaic way of saying “formerly, before the present time”. The term is mostly seen as part of the word “erstwhile”, an adjective meaning “of times past”.

87. Algebra staples : UNKNOWNS

Algebra (alg.) is a branch of mathematics in which arithmetical operations are performed on variables rather than specific numbers (x,y etc). The term “algebra” comes from the Arabic “al jebr” meaning “reunion of broken parts”.

90. Year abroad : ANNEE

“Année” is a French word for “year”.

102. Banter : JIVE

“Jive” is a slang term meaning “nonsensical talk”.

103. Nutritional stds. : RDAS

Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs) were introduced during WWII, and were replaced by Recommended Daily Intakes (RDIs) in 1997.

105. Mother of Ares : HERA

In Greek mythology, Hera was the wife of Zeus and was noted for her jealous and vengeful nature, particularly against those who vied for the affections of her husband. The equivalent character to Hera in Roman mythology was Juno. Hera was the daughter of Cronus and Rhea.

The Greek god Ares is often referred to as the Olympian god of warfare, but originally he was regarded as the god of bloodlust and slaughter. Ares united with Aphrodite to create several gods, including Phobos (Fear), Deimos (Terror) and Eros (Desire). Ares was the son of Zeus and Hera, and the Roman equivalent to Ares was Mars.

108. Mature eft : NEWT

Newts wouldn’t be my favorite animals. They are found all over the world living on land or in water depending on the species, but always associated with water even if it is only for breeding. Newts metamorphose through three distinct developmental stages during their lives. They start off as larvae in water, fertilized eggs that often cling to aquatic plants. The eggs hatch into tadpoles, the first developmental form of the newt. After living some months as tadpoles swimming around in the water, they undergo another metamorphosis, sprouting legs and replacing their external gills with lungs. At this juvenile stage they are known as efts, and leave the water to live on land. A more gradual transition takes place then, as the eft takes on the lizard-like appearance of the adult newt.

109. Pixar Studios’ specialty, for short : CGI

Computer-generated imagery (CGI)

Pixar Animation Studios started out as part of Lucasfilm in 1979, George Lucas’s production company. Lucas sold what was to become Pixar to Apple CEO Steve Jobs in 1986. Pixar produced its first feature film in 1995, the fabulous “Toy Story”, and followed up with a string of hits. The company was then sold to Walt Disney in 2006, when valued at $7.4 billion. That transaction resulted in Steve Jobs becoming the biggest shareholder in Walt Disney.

110. __ cit.: footnote abbr. : LOC

“Loc. cit”. is short for “loco citato” meaning “in the place cited”. Loc. cit. is used in a footnote instead of op. cit. as it refers not only to a prior work, but also to the same page in that work.

114. Underground org.? : UMW

The United Mine Workers (UMW) is a labor union that represents mine workers (and now other disciplines) in the US and Canada. The UMW was founded in Columbus, Ohio in 1890.

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Scrabble accessories : RACKS
6. Long-grained rice : BASMATI
13. Cajun crustacean : CRAWDAD
20. Target reader of a series of guides, facetiously : IDIOT
21. Odysseus, e.g. : ITHACAN
22. Struck a chord : HIT HOME
23. Kids’ eager query : CAN WE?
24. Subject of an 1857 Elizabeth Gaskell biography : CHARLOTTE BRONTE
26. Seal predator : ORCA
27. Really enjoy, with “in” : BASK
28. ’80s police show partner : LACEY
29. Better, to a rapper : ILLER
31. Proprietors’ places : INNS
35. Generous limit? : SKY
36. “I’m __”: “Dragnet” line : A COP
40. Organization that really counts : CENSUS BUREAU
43. Meet with privately : SEE ALONE
45. Tearjerker need : HANKIE
46. Enriched : FATTENED
48. Nautical time units : BELLS
49. Actor Morales : ESAI
50. Tourism prefix : ECO-
52. Mojito flavoring : LIME
53. Like some portrait photos : BACKLIT
55. Unyielding : SET
56. Having four sharps : IN E
57. Tribute group : COVER BAND
59. Phoenix-to-Albuquerque dir. : ENE
60. Gill openings : SLITS
62. Like the Valkyries : NORSE
64. “No Limit Top __”: 1999 rap album : DOGG
65. Stress, they say : AGER
66. Shows obvious anger : BRISTLES
68. Teddies, e.g. : LINGERIE
70. Seehorn of “Better Call Saul” : RHEA
72. Diamond stats : ERAS
73. R&B singer __ Marie : TEENA
74. __ Dumbledore, Hogwarts headmaster : ALBUS
77. Poetic time : E’EN
78. Microbrewery choice : CRAFT BEER
80. Play date : GIG
82. RSA ruling party : ANC
83. “Yeah, so?” : BIG DEAL
85. Logician’s “E” : ERAT
86. Either of baseball’s Griffeys : KEN
87. Food stamp? : USDA
88. How the euphoric walk : ON AIR
89. “The Godfather” catchphrase : BADA-BING
92. Lost intentionally : TANKED
94. Rockefeller, e.g. : OIL BARON
96. Bletchley Park analysts : CODEBREAKERS
98. Trueheart of comics : TESS
99. Bass ending : -OON
100. Business bigwig : EXEC
101. Worshiping figure : ORANT
102. One of a deck’s pair : JOKER
104. “Star Trek” villain : KHAN
106. Scottish resort town known for its whisky : OBAN
109. Ghee, e.g. : CLARIFIED BUTTER
116. Low area : SWALE
117. Settled accounts, so to speak : GOT EVEN
118. Big wardrobe : ARMOIRE
119. Almost off : ON LOW
120. Salad choice : ICEBERG
121. Low-quality material, idiomatically : SOW’S EAR
122. Castaway’s place : ISLET

Down

1. Bad guy in the song “Copacabana” : RICO
2. Month before Nisan : ADAR
3. Team that hasn’t won a Super Bowl in its 50-year existence : CINCINNATI BENGALS
4. Brando’s “A Streetcar Named Desire” role : KOWALSKI
5. Chateau __ Michelle winery : STE
6. Antacid option : BICARB
7. Olympians, e.g.: Abbr. : ATHS
8. One-named Colombian singer : SHAKIRA
9. Scuff, e.g. : MAR
10. Often-injured knee part, briefly : ACL
11. Confucian path : TAO
12. IOC part: Abbr. : INTL
13. It’s seen on carousels : CHECKED BAGGAGE
14. Marbled cut : RIBEYE
15. “Give it __” : A TRY
16. One of many Seuss village residents : WHO
17. Put on : DON
18. Product, say: Abbr. : AMT
19. Capital of Denmark? : DEE
25. Nice cup? : TASSE
27. Consult with the doctor : BE SEEN
30. Him, to Henri : LUI
32. Figure in red : NET LOSS
33. Indigenous : NATIVE
34. Defiant challenge : SUE ME!
36. Fashion model Wek : ALEK
37. Amateur sport since 1893 : COLLEGE BASKETBALL
38. Connected, in a way : ONLINE
39. Annoy : PESTER
40. Mating game : CHESS
41. Flip chart holder : EASEL
42. Roswell sighting : UFO
44. Sequence sung like “Twinkle twinkle” : ABCD
47. Less cool : NERDIER
51. Perp processing area : CENTRAL BOOKING
54. Sylvie’s seraph : ANGE
56. “It __”: formal self-identification : IS I
57. Reached an apex : CRESTED
58. Cold War capital : BONN
61. Singing syllable : TRA
63. “Frozen” snowman : OLAF
65. Catch a bug : AIL
67. Evening on Etna : SERA
68. Small fishing boat concern : LEE TIDE
69. Taunt : RAG
70. Recover from a crash : REBOOT
71. Bum : HEINIE
73. Place to keep leaves : TEA BOX
75. Over-__: sports wager : UNDER
76. Boatloads : SCADS
78. Michael of “Arrested Development” : CERA
79. Prepare for impact : BRACE
81. Summer hire, perhaps : INTERN
84. Claim to call : DIBS
86. Erstwhile CIA rival : KGB
87. Algebra staples : UNKNOWNS
90. Year abroad : ANNEE
91. Casual Friday casualty? : NECKTIE
93. Bond rating : AAA
95. One whose business is mostly overhead? : ROOFER
97. Lion or tiger : ROARER
102. Banter : JIVE
103. Nutritional stds. : RDAS
105. Mother of Ares : HERA
107. Ointment additive : ALOE
108. Mature eft : NEWT
109. Pixar Studios’ specialty, for short : CGI
110. __ cit.: footnote abbr. : LOC
111. Bore, as a cost : ATE
112. Yank’s opponent : REB
113. “Dude!” : BRO!
114. Underground org.? : UMW
115. How-__: instruction books : TOS
116. “__ lied” : SO I

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