LA Times Crossword Answers 15 Jun 2018, Friday

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Constructed by: Ethan Cooper
Edited by: Rich Norris

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Today’s Reveal Answer: Magazine Inserts

Themed answers are common phrases with the name of a MAGAZINE INSERTED:

  • 37A. Perfume samples, maybe … or what this puzzle’s circles are : MAGAZINE INSERTS
  • 17A. Literary agents who sold “Catch-22”? : HELLER REPS (“Elle” in “HR reps”)
  • 27A. Defective Chatty Cathys? : RASPING DOLLS (“Spin” in “rag dolls”)
  • 45A. Hanging out by the lockers, etc.? : HALL PASTIMES (“Time” in “hall passes”)
  • 62A. Uncomfortable look from the queen? : ROYAL WINCE (“Inc.” in “royal we”)

Bill’s time: 14m 31s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. “__ talks!”: “Anna Christie” tagline : GARBO

“Anna Christie” is a 1930 film adapted from the 1921 play of the same name by Eugene O’Neill. The celebrated actress Greta Garbo plays the title role, in a performance that was her first speaking part. That debut led to the film being marketed with the slogan “Garbo Talks!” Garbo’s first spoken line is “Gimme a whisky, ginger ale on the side, and don’t be stingy, baby!”

10. Fox Business competitor : CNBC

CNBC is a business news channel owned by NBC. Launched in 1989, CNBC was known as the Consumer News and Business Channel up until 1991.

Fox Business Network (FBN) is the business news channel of the Fox Entertainment Group. FBN was launched in 2007.

14. 2015 boxing film : CREED

“Creed” is a 2015 boxing movie, the seventh in the “Rocky” franchise. Sylvester Stallone returns as Rocky Balboa, but this time as a trainer. Rocky trains Apollo Creed’s son Adonis. Stallone was nominated for an Oscar for his supporting role in the film. It was the first Academy Award nomination he had received since the first “Rocky” film, which was released almost forty years earlier.

17. Literary agents who sold “Catch-22”? : HELLER REPS (“Elle” in “HR reps”)

“Catch-22” is a novel by Joseph Heller set during WWII. The title refers to absurd bureaucratic constraints that soldiers had to suffer. Heller’s “Catch 22” was invoked by an army psychiatrist to explain that any pilot requesting to be evaluated for insanity, to avoid flying dangerous missions, had to be sane as only a sane man would try to get out of such missions. The term “catch-22” has entered the language and describes a paradoxical situation from which one can’t escape due to contradictory rules; one loses, no matter what choice one makes.

“Elle” magazine was founded in 1945 in France and today has the highest circulation of any fashion magazine in the world. “Elle” is the French word for “she”. “Elle” is published monthly worldwide, although you can pick up a weekly edition if you live in France.

19. Cuyahoga River outlet : ERIE

The Cuyahoga River in northeastern Ohio has a sad history. Deemed to be one of the most polluted US rivers in the 20th century, the river actually caught fire at least 13 times. A 1952 blaze caused over a million dollars worth of damage. Things have improved over the past few decades, with fish now inhabiting stretched off the river that were once practically devoid of life.

23. Gumshoe : TEC

“Gumshoe” is a slang term for a private detective or private investigator (P.I.). Apparently the term dates back to the early 1900s, and refers to the rubber-soled shoes popular with private detectives at that time.

26. They test the waters: Abbr. : EPA

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

27. Defective Chatty Cathys? : RASPING DOLLS (“Spin” in “rag dolls”)

Chatty Cathy is a doll that was produced by Mattel from 1959 to 1965. Chatty Cathy could utter eleven phrases when a ring on a cord was pulled at the back of the doll. The speech was generated by a tiny phonograph record that was housed in the doll’s abdomen.

“Spin” is a music magazine founded in 1985 by Bob Guccione, Jr. Bob is the eldest son of “Penthouse” founder Bob Guccione. “Spin” abandoned its print edition in 2012 and now only exists as a webzine.

32. “Six Feet Under” creator Ball : ALAN

Screenwriter Alan Ball has a few hits attributed to him. He wrote the original screenplay for the 1999 movie “American Beauty”, and also created the very successful cable TV shows “Six Feet Under” and “True Blood”.

“Six Feet Under” is reportedly a great TV drama aired on HBO, and one that I fully intend to take a look at one day. The “six feet under” is a reference to the show’s storyline that features a family funeral business.

36. ___ de parfum : EAU

In the world of perfumery, eau de parfum (EdP) is generally more concentrated than eau de toilette (EdT), which in turn is generally more concentrated than eau de cologne (EdC).

42. NYC’s Lex, e.g. : AVE

Lexington Avenue in New York City is famous from many things, but my favorite fact is that it was the site of the first ever arrest for speeding in the city. In 1899 a police officer on a bicycle caught up with a cab driver who was tearing down Lexington Avenue, at the breakneck speed of 12mph …

44. 42-Across et al. : RTES

Route (rte.)

45. Hanging out by the lockers, etc.? : HALL PASTIMES (“Time” in “hall passes”)

“Time” magazine has a readership of about 25 million, making it the largest-circulation weekly news magazine in the world.

50. Note from someone in a hole : IOU

I owe you (IOU)

51. Gerald R. Ford Award org. : NCAA

The Gerald R. Ford Award has been presented annually by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) since 2004. The award honors individuals who have been persistent advocates for intercollegiate athletics over their careers. President Ford played football with the University of Michigan, and turned down contract offers from the Green Bay Packers and the Detroit Lions in order to study law at Yale.

52. Dadaist Jean : ARP

Jean Arp was a French artist renowned for his work with torn and pasted paper, although that wasn’t the only medium he used. Arp was the son of a French mother and German father and spoke both languages fluently. When he was speaking German he gave his name as Hans Arp, but when speaking French he called himself Jean Arp. Both “Hans” and “Jean” translate into English as “John”. In WWI Arp moved to Switzerland to avoid being called up to fight, taking advantage of Swiss neutrality. Eventually he was told to report to the German Consulate and fill out paperwork for the draft. In order to get out of fighting, Arp messed up the paperwork by writing the date in every blank space on the forms. Then he took off all of his clothes and walked with his papers over to the officials in charge. Arp was sent home …

Dadaism thrived during and just after WWI, and was an anti-war, anti-bourgeois and anti-art culture. The movement began in Zurich, Switzerland started by a group of artists and writers who met to discuss art and put on performances in the Cabaret Voltaire, frequently expressing disgust at the war that was raging across Europe.

59. Home to Iberia and Siberia : EURASIA

Eurasia is the combined continental landmass of Europe and Asia. It accounts for 36% of the total landmass on the planet, and is home to 71% of the Earth’s population.

The Iberian Peninsula in Europe is largely made up of Spain and Portugal. However, also included is the Principality of Andorra in the Pyrénées, a small part of the south of France, and the British Territory of Gibraltar. Iberia takes its name from the Ebro, the longest river in Spain, which the Romans named the “Iber”.

Siberia is a vast area in Northern Asia. The region’s industrial development started with the construction of the Trans-Siberian Railway from 1891 to 1916, which linked Siberia to Russia in the west.

62. Uncomfortable look from the queen? : ROYAL WINCE (“Inc.” in “royal we”)

The royal we is more correctly called the “majestic plural”, and is the use of a plural pronoun to describe a single person in a high office. I suppose the most often quoted phrase that uses the majestic plural is “We are not amused”, which is often attributed to Queen Victoria. The editorial we is a similar concept, in which a newspaper editor or columnist refers to himself or herself as “we” when giving an opinion.

“Inc.” is a business magazine that specializes in articles about growing companies. “Inc.” publishes a list of the 500 fastest-growing private companies in the country each year, calling it the “Inc. 500”. The “Inc 5000” is an expanded list also published by the magazine.

64. Casual farewell : TA-TA

An Englishman might say “ta-ta” or “cheerio” instead of “goodbye”. Well, supposedly so …

65. Party mix staple : CHEX

The original Chex cereal was introduced in 1937 by Ralston Purina, although it is now produced by General Mills. Ralston Purina had a logo with a checkerboard square on it, which gave the pattern to the cereal as well as its name. Chex used characters from the “Peanuts” comic strip in its advertising for many years.

66. Sorbonne concepts : IDEES

“Sorbonne” is the name usually used for the old University of Paris, and some of the institutions that have succeeded it. The institution was named for French theologian Robert de Sorbonne who founded the original Collège de Sorbonne in 1257. That’s quite a while ago …

68. “My only love sprung from my only __!”: Juliet : HATE

Here are some lines from William Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet”:

My only love sprung from my only hate!
Too early seen unknown, and known too late!
Prodigious birth of love it is to me
That I must love a loathèd enemy.

Juliet has fallen in love with Romeo, her “only love”. Ironically, Romeo is from the Montague clan that her family detests (her “only hate”).

69. Swashbuckler’s word : GARDE

“En garde” is a French term that has been absorbed into the sport of fencing. Originally a warning “on guard!”, it is spoken at the start of an encounter to warn the fencers to take a defensive position.

A swashbuckler is a flashy swordsman. The term “swashbuckler” probably derives somehow from “swash” meaning “fall of a blow”, and “buckler” meaning “small round shield”.

Down

1. Popular IM service : GCHAT

“Gchat” was a common name used for the Google Talk instant messaging (IM) service. Google Talk offered both text and voice communication as well as a plugin that allowed video chat. All of this functionality was replaced with the Google Hangouts service, and more recently with Google Duo.

2. Glacial ridge : ARETE

An arete is ridge of rock defining the border between two parallel valleys that have been formed by glaciation. If this ridge is rounded, it is called a “col”. However if it is “sharpened”, with rock falling way due to successive freezing and thawing, then it is called an “arete”. “Arête“ is the French word for “fish bone”.

4. Units named for AT&T’s founder : BELS

In the world of acoustics, one bel is equal to ten decibels (dBs). The bel is named in honor of the inventor of the telephone, Alexander Graham Bell.

The American Telephone and Telegraph Company (AT&T, Ma Bell) was a subsidiary of the original Bell Telephone Company that was founded by Alexander Graham Bell, the inventor of the telephone. AT&T was forced to divest several subsidiaries in 1982 when the company lost an antitrust lawsuit. Those subsidiaries were known as Regional Bell Operating Systems, or “Baby Bells”.

5. Ukrainian port : ODESSA

The city of Odessa (also “Odesa”) in Ukraine was founded relatively recently, in 1794 by Catherine the Great. The city was originally meant to be called Odessos after an ancient Greek city believed to have been located nearby. Catherine liked the way the locals pronounced the name as “Odessa” and so went with the less Greek-sounding name.

6. “The Deer Hunter” actress : STREEP

Meryl Streep has had more nominations for an Academy Award than any other actor, which is both a tribute to her talent and the respect she has earned in the industry. I am not a huge fan of her earlier works but some of her recent movies are now on my list of all-time favorites. I recommend “Mamma Mia!” (you’ll either love it or hate it!), “Julie & Julia”, “It’s Complicated” and ”Hope Springs”.

“The Deer Hunter” is a disturbing 1978 movie about three Russian Americans from Pennsylvania, and their time in the military during the Vietnam War. The “game” of Russian Roulette features prominently in the film’s storyline. According to director Michael Cimino, Robert de Niro requested that a live cartridge be loaded in the gun during the main Russian Roulette scene, to heighten the intensity of the atmosphere. Cimino agreed, although he was quite obsessive about ensuring that for each take, the bullet wasn’t next in the chamber.

8. Insensitive, briefly : UN-PC

To be un-PC is to be politically incorrect, not be politically correct (PC).

9. Erosion formation : MESA

“What’s the difference between a butte and a mesa?” Both are hills with flat tops, but a mesa has a top that is wider than it is tall. A butte is a much narrower formation, taller than it is wide.

12. Part of a sting : BAIT

That would be a sting operation.

13. 1963 Liz Taylor role : CLEO

The 1963 movie “Cleopatra” really is an epic work. It was the highest grossing film of the year, taking in $26 million dollars at the box office, yet it still lost money. The original budget for the film was just $2 million, but so many things went wrong the final cost swelled to a staggering $44 million dollars, making it the second most expensive movie ever made (taking into account inflation). Elizabeth Taylor was supposed to earn a record amount of $1 million for the film, and ended up earned seven times that amount due to delays. But she paid dearly, as she became seriously ill during shooting and had to have an emergency tracheotomy to save her life. The scar in her throat can actually be seen in some of the shots in the film.

22. Fruity ale brand : REDD’S

Redd’s Apple Ale is a beer, not a cider. That means that Redd’s gets its alcohol from fermented and malted grain, and not from fermented apple juice.

25. Column part that’s strictly ornamental? : SILENT N

The last letter of the word “column” is a silent letter N (en).

27. Genetics lab subject : RNA

Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. That sequence is read in DNA by messenger RNA, and amino acids are delivered for protein manufacture in the correct sequence by what is called transfer RNA. The amino acids are then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA.

28. “__ won’t back down”: Tom Petty lyric : NO, I

The singer-songwriter Tom Petty first became interested in rock and roll music when he met Elvis Presley at ten-years-old. Later Petty was inspired to get into a band when he saw the Beatles on “The Ed Sullivan Show”. He became the lead singer of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, and later co-founded the supergroup called the Traveling Wilburys.

31. Work (out) : SUSS

The verb “to suss” means “to figure out”. The term originated in the 1950s as police slang, and is a shortening of “to suspect”.

32. Indian nanny : AMAH

“Amah” is an interesting word in that we associate it so much with Asian culture and yet the term actually comes from the Portuguese “ama” meaning “nurse”. Ama was imported into English in the days of the British Raj in India when a wet-nurse became known as an amah.

38. Close, as a duffel : ZIP UP

A duffel bag is cylindrical tote bag with a drawstring top, often used by military personnel. The bag is made of this cloth, a cloth that originally came from the town of Duffel in Belgium, hence the name.

39. Glass of “This American Life” : IRA

Ira Glass is a well-respected presenter on American Public Radio who is perhaps best known for his show “This American Life”. I was interested to learn that one of my favorite composers, Philip Glass, is Ira’s first cousin.

40. Primes, e.g.: Abbr. : NOS

A prime number is a number greater than 1 that can only be divided evenly by 1 and itself. There are still some unanswered questions involving prime numbers, perhaps most notably Goldbach’s Conjecture. This conjecture dates back to the 1740s and is assumed to be true, but has never been proven. It states that every even integer greater than 2 can be expressed as the sum of two prime numbers.

41. Hectic hosp. zones : ERS

Emergency room (ER)

46. Shower tool : LOOFAH

The loofah (also “loofa”, “lufah” and “luffa”, all Arabic words) is a vine, with fruit that’s very popular in Asia and Africa. If the fruit is allowed to mature, it can be processed to remove everything but the more rigid xylem structure (remember your high school botany class?) leaving a soft, sponge-like mass that is used as a skin polisher.

48. Hammering tool : MAUL

A maul is a large, heavy hammer, one often used for driving stakes into the ground. The term comes from the Old French “mail” and ultimately from the Latin “malleus”, with both meaning “hammer”.

49. Crop-eating insect : EARWIG

The insect known as the earwig may have gotten its name from the mistaken belief that it burrowed into the human brain via the ear canal in order to lay its eggs in the brain.

52. He played a TV newsroom boss : ASNER

Ed Asner is most famous for playing the irascible but lovable Lou Grant on “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” and on the spin-off drama “Lou Grant”. Off-screen Asner is noted for his political activism. He served two terms as president of the Screen Actors Guild (SAG), and was very involved in the 1980 SAG strike. When “Lou Grant” was cancelled in in 1982, despite decent ratings, there was a lot of talk that the cancellation was a move by the network against Asner personally. In fact, one of Asner’s activist colleagues, Howard Hesseman (who played Johnny Fever) found that his show “WKRP in Cincinnati” was also canceled … on the very same day.

56. Old Testament redhead : ESAU

Esau was the twin brother of Jacob, the founder of the Israelites. When their mother Rebekah gave birth to the twins “the first emerged red and hairy all over (Esau), with his heel grasped by the hand of the second to come out (Jacob)”. As Esau was the first born, he was entitled to inherit his father’s wealth (it was his “birthright”). Instead, Esau sold his birthright to Jacob for the price of a “mess of pottage” (a meal of lentils).

57. Prefix with rival : ARCH-

We use “arch-” to mean “chief, principal”. Said prefix comes from the combining form of the Greek word “arkhos” meaning “chief, lead, commander”.

58. City where Al Jazeera is headquartered : DOHA

Doha is the capital city of the state of Qatar located on the Persian Gulf. The name “Doha” translates from Arabic as “the big tree”.

Al Jazeera is an independent news service owned by the state of Qatar. Since 2006, Al Jazeera has been broadcasting an English language channel, hiring many top journalists from American news outlets. “Al jazeera” is Arabic for “the island”.

60. Verdi princess : AIDA

“Aida” is a famous opera by Giuseppe Verdi that is based on a scenario written by French Egyptologist Auguste Mariette. Mariette also designed the costumes and stages for the opening performance. The opera was first staged in 1871 in an opera house in Cairo. In the storyline, Aida is an Ethiopian princess brought into Egypt as a slave. Radames is an Egyptian commander who falls in love with her, and then of course complications arise!

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. “__ talks!”: “Anna Christie” tagline : GARBO
6. Pond floater : SCUM
10. Fox Business competitor : CNBC
14. 2015 boxing film : CREED
15. Ditty : TUNE
16. Total : REAL
17. Literary agents who sold “Catch-22”? : HELLER REPS (“Elle” in “HR reps”)
19. Cuyahoga River outlet : ERIE
20. Still unresolved : AT ISSUE
21. Were so inclined : CARED TO
23. Gumshoe : TEC
24. Dates : SEES
26. They test the waters: Abbr. : EPA
27. Defective Chatty Cathys? : RASPING DOLLS (“Spin” in “rag dolls”)
32. “Six Feet Under” creator Ball : ALAN
35. Like metal concerts : LOUD
36. ___ de parfum : EAU
37. Perfume samples, maybe … or what this puzzle’s circles are : MAGAZINE INSERTS
42. NYC’s Lex, e.g. : AVE
43. Steam producer : IRON
44. 42-Across et al. : RTES
45. Hanging out by the lockers, etc.? : HALL PASTIMES (“Time” in “hall passes”)
50. Note from someone in a hole : IOU
51. Gerald R. Ford Award org. : NCAA
52. Dadaist Jean : ARP
55. Note taker’s need : MEMO PAD
59. Home to Iberia and Siberia : EURASIA
61. “Oh, ri-i-ight” : AS IF
62. Uncomfortable look from the queen? : ROYAL WINCE (“Inc.” in “royal we”)
64. Casual farewell : TA-TA
65. Party mix staple : CHEX
66. Sorbonne concepts : IDEES
67. “Can it!” : HUSH!
68. “My only love sprung from my only __!”: Juliet : HATE
69. Swashbuckler’s word : GARDE

Down

1. Popular IM service : GCHAT
2. Glacial ridge : ARETE
3. Museum piece : RELIC
4. Units named for AT&T’s founder : BELS
5. Ukrainian port : ODESSA
6. “The Deer Hunter” actress : STREEP
7. Reminder : CUE
8. Insensitive, briefly : UN-PC
9. Erosion formation : MESA
10. Shudder-inducing sort, slangily : CREEPO
11. “Check out the brain over here!” : NERD ALERT!
12. Part of a sting : BAIT
13. 1963 Liz Taylor role : CLEO
18. Is sorry about : RUES
22. Fruity ale brand : REDD’S
25. Column part that’s strictly ornamental? : SILENT N
27. Genetics lab subject : RNA
28. “__ won’t back down”: Tom Petty lyric : NO, I
29. __-shy : GUN
30. Rushing, perhaps : LATE
31. Work (out) : SUSS
32. Indian nanny : AMAH
33. Volcanic flower : LAVA
34. Features of many kids’ menus : AGE LIMITS
38. Close, as a duffel : ZIP UP
39. Glass of “This American Life” : IRA
40. Primes, e.g.: Abbr. : NOS
41. Hectic hosp. zones : ERS
46. Shower tool : LOOFAH
47. Mountaineering tool : ICE AXE
48. Hammering tool : MAUL
49. Crop-eating insect : EARWIG
52. He played a TV newsroom boss : ASNER
53. Cut to bits : RICED
54. Country, in Italy : PAESE
55. Course where kids check products? : MATH
56. Old Testament redhead : ESAU
57. Prefix with rival : ARCH-
58. City where Al Jazeera is headquartered : DOHA
60. Verdi princess : AIDA
63. To this time : YET

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