LA Times Crossword Answers 19 Jun 2018, Tuesday

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Constructed by: Joe Schewe
Edited by: Rich Norris

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Today’s Reveal Answer: Wired

Themed answers each end with something that is WIRED:

  • 39A. Tense with excitement … and a hint to the ends of the four longest puzzle answers : WIRED
  • 17A. Carry only a carry-on, say : TRAVEL LIGHT
  • 24A. MLB’s National League nickname (because it was founded first) : SENIOR CIRCUIT
  • 47A. Unscrupulous sales tactic : BAIT AND SWITCH
  • 57A. Chaw in a cheek : TOBACCO PLUG

Bill’s time: 5m 00s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Like aged cheddar : SHARP

Cheddar cheese takes its name from the English village of Cheddar in Somerset. Over 50% of the cheese sold in the UK is cheddar. Here in the US cheddar is the second most popular cheese sold, behind mozzarella.

11. Clavell’s “__-Pan” : TAI

“Tai-Pan” is a novel by James Clavell, and the second in his famous “Asian Saga” suite of six titles. The six books are:

  • “King Rat”
  • “Tai-Pan”
  • “Shōgun”
  • “Noble House”
  • “Whirlwind”
  • “Gai-Jin”

14. Down-yielding duck : EIDER

Eiders are large sea ducks. Their down feathers are used to fill pillows and quilts, giving the name to the quilt called an “eiderdown”.

15. IRA-establishing legislation : ERISA

ERISA is the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, enacted in 1974. ERISA regulates the operation of a pension plan once it has been established. However, ERISA does not require that a pension plan be offered by an employer. ERISA is also the legislation that introduced what is now referred to a traditional IRA (individual retirement account).

16. __ Tin Tin : RIN

The original Rin Tin Tin was a real-life dog, a puppy discovered by a GI in a bombed-out kennel in France during WWI. The soldier named the pup Rin Tin Tin, the same name as a puppet given to American soldiers for luck. On returning to the US, “Rinty” was trained by his owner and was spotted doing tricks by a film producer. Rinty featured in some films, eventually getting his first starring role in 1923 in the silent movie “Where the North Begins”. Legend has it that this first Rin Tin Tin died in the arms of actress Jean Harlow. Not a bad way to go …

22. Bacteria in food recalls : E COLI

Escherichia coli (E. coli) are usually harmless bacteria found in the human gut, working away quite happily. However, there are some strains that can produce lethal toxins. These strains can make their way into the food chain from animal fecal matter that comes into contact with food designated for human consumption.

31. Rainbow-shaped : ARCED

Sunlight shining through airborne water droplets can produce rainbows. The water droplets act as little prisms, dispersing the white light into its constituent colors. Sometimes we see double rainbows. If we look carefully, we can see that the order of the colors in the first and second arcs is reversed.

34. Five-time Silver Slugger Award-winning catcher Joe : MAUER

Joe Mauer is a professional baseball player from St. Paul, Minnesota who started playing for the Minnesota Twins in 2004. Mauer is famous for wearing long sideburns, it says here …

The Silver Slugger Award is presented annually to the best offensive MLB player at each baseball position in the American and National Leagues. The award was inaugurated in 1980, and is decided by the MLB coaches and managers as a group.

35. The 2% in 2% milk : FAT

The fatty component of milk is known as butterfat (sometimes “milkfat”). To be labeled whole milk, the butterfat content must be at least 3.25%. Low-fat milk is defined as milk containing 0.5-2% fat, with levels of 1% and 2% commonly found on grocery store shelves. Skim milk must contain less than 0.5% fat, and typically contains 0.1%.

38. Nobel physicist Niels : BOHR

Niels Bohr was a Danish physicist who won his 1922 Nobel Prize for his work on quantum mechanics and atomic structure. Later in his life, Bohr was part of the team working on the Manhattan Project that developed the first atomic bomb. Niels Bohr and Albert Einstein had a series of public debates and disputes in the twenties and thirties. Although the two respected each other very highly, they held very different views on quantum theory, different views on the laws of physics at the atomic level. The passage of time has shown that Bohr won out in those debates.

43. Aleppo’s land : SYRIA

Aleppo is the largest city in Syria and is located not far from Damascus, the nation’s capital. Aleppo owes it size and history of prosperity to its location at the end of the Silk Road, the trade route that linked Asia to Europe (and other locations). The Suez Canal was opened up in 1869 bringing a new route for transport of goods, and so Aleppo’s prosperity declined over the past one hundred years or so. The city’s population has suffered terribly since the start of the Syrian Civil War, with the Battle of Aleppo raging from 2012 to 2016.

44. Martin of “Route 66” : MILNER

Martin Milner is a former actor who is best known for playing lead roles on the TV shows “Route 66” and “Adam-12”. Milner is enjoying his retirement in California, as the owner of a productive walnut farm.

“Route 66” is a classic television show from the early sixties about two young men traveling across the US in a Corvette. The original lead characters were Tod Stiles (played by Martin Milner) and Buz Murdock (played by George Maharis), with Murdock being replaced by a character called Lincoln Case (played by Glenn Corbett) in the third season.

46. Buddhist discipline : ZEN

Zen is a Buddhist school that developed its own tradition in China back in the 7th century AD. Zen is a Japanese spelling of the Chinese word “chan”, which in turn derives from the Sanskrit word “dhyana” meaning “meditation”.

47. Unscrupulous sales tactic : BAIT-AND-SWITCH

The term “bait-and-switch” describes a kind of fraud engaged in by disingenuous retailers. Customers are drawn in (baited) by advertising products at an extremely attractive price. Once the customer visits the store in search of the deal, he or she discovers that the advertised goods aren’t in fact available. A deceptive salesperson then guides (switches) the customer to a similar and higher-priced item.

57. Chaw in a cheek : TOBACCO PLUG

“Chaw” is a slang term for “chew”, often a plug of tobacco.

62. Knight’s title : SIR

Kneel, and a monarch might “dub thee a knight” if you’re lucky. “Dub” is a specific term derived from Old English that was used to mean “make a knight”. As the knight was also given a knightly name at the same time, “dub” has come to mean “give someone a name”.

67. Vetoes : NIXES

The use of “nix” as a verb, meaning “to shoot down”, dates back to the early 1900s. Before that “nix” was just a noun meaning “nothing”. “Nix” comes from the German “nichts”, which also means “nothing”.

The verb “veto” comes directly from Latin and means “I forbid”. The term was used by tribunes of Ancient Rome to indicate that they opposed measures passed by the Senate.

Down

1. Meyers of late-night TV : SETH

Seth Meyers is an actor and comedian who is perhaps best-known for his appearances on “Saturday Night Live” (SNL), for which program he served as head writer. Meyers now hosts his own late night talk show on NBC.

3. Frequent Yosemite photographer Ansel : ADAMS

As an avid amateur photographer, I have been a big fan of the work of Ansel Adams for many years and must have read all of his books. Adams was famous for clarity and depth in his black and white images. Central to his technique was the use of the zone system, his own invention. The zone system is a way of controlling exposure in an image, particularly when there is a high contrast in the subject. Although the technique was developed primarily for black & white film, it can even apply to digital color images. In the digital world, the main technique is to expose an image for the highlights, and one or more images for the shadows. These images can then be combined digitally giving a final photograph with a full and satisfying range of exposures.

6. Upright violin kin : CELLO

The word “cello” (plural “celli” or “cellos”) is an abbreviation for “violoncello”, an Italian word for “little violone”, referring to a group of stringed instruments that were popular up to the end of the 17th century. The name violoncello persisted for the instrument that we know today, although the abbreviation ‘cello was often used. Nowadays we just drop the apostrophe.

7. Ocean State sch. : URI

The University of Rhode Island (URI) was chartered as an agricultural school back in 1888. Rhody the Ram was chosen as the school’s mascot in 1923, a nod to URI’s agricultural past. As a result, the school’s sports teams are known as the Rams. URI’s main campus is located in the village of Kingston.

Rhode Island is the smallest state in the union, and is the second most densely populated. (after New Jersey). Rhode Island is known as the Ocean State, largely because about 14% of the state’s area is made up of ocean bays and inlets. Exactly how Rhode Island got its name is a little unclear. What is known is that way back in 1524, long before the Pilgrims came to New England, the Italian explorer Giovanni da Verrazzano likened an island in the area to the Island of Rhodes in the Mediterranean. There were subsequent references to “Rhode Island” in English publications, before the colonists arrived.

8. The __ Dipper : BIG

The constellation Ursa Major (Latin for “Larger Bear”) is often just called “the Big Dipper” because of its resemblance to a ladle or dipper. Ursa Major also resembles a plow, and that’s what we usually call the same constellation back in Ireland, “the Plough”.

12. Garlicky mayo : AIOLI

To the purist, especially in Provence in the South of France, aioli is prepared just by grinding garlic with olive oil. However, other ingredients are often added to the mix, particularly egg yolks.

13. Alaskan native : INUIT

The Inuit peoples live in the Arctic, in parts of the US, Russia, Greenland and Canada.

18. Floral garlands : LEIS

“Lei” is the Hawaiian word for “garland, wreath”, although in more general terms a lei is any series of objects strung together as an adornment for the body.

23. IV units : CCS

Cubic centimeter (cc)

31. Old hoops org. : ABA

American Bar Association (ABA)

37. Earl Grey, e.g. : TEA

The Earl Grey blend of tea is supposedly named after Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey who was Prime Minister of the UK from 1830 to 1834. Earl Grey tea has a distinctive flavor that is largely due to the addition of oil from the rind of the bergamot orange.

39. Casino mogul Steve : WYNN

Steve Wynn is a businessman who made most of his fortune building and refurbishing casinos during the resurgence of Las Vegas in the 1990s. Today, Wynn is quite the art collector and has paid record prices for paintings by both Turner and Rembrandt. Wynn stepped down as CEO of Wynn resorts in 2018 as he faces dozens of accusations of sexual misconduct.

45. Hairy Addams cousin : ITT

In the television sitcom “The Addams Family”, the family had a frequent visitor called Cousin Itt. Itt is a short man with long hair that runs from his head to the floor. Cousin Itt was played by Italian actor Felix Silla.

46. Galvanizing metal : ZINC

Steel or iron can be galvanized to prevent rusting. The galvanization process involves the application of a protective zinc coat. The most common method used is hot-dipping in a bath of molten zinc metal.

48. Eagle’s nest : AERIE

An aerie is the nest of an eagle, and is also known as an eyrie.

50. DNA structure : HELIX

Francis Crick and James Watson discovered that DNA had a double-helix, chain-like structure, and published their results in Cambridge in 1953. To this day the discovery is mired in controversy, as some crucial results collected by fellow researcher Rosalind Franklin were used without her permission or even knowledge.

54. Ancient character : RUNE

A rune is a character in an alphabet that is believed to have mysterious powers. In Norse mythology, the runic alphabet was said to have a divine origin.

58. __-Wan Kenobi : OBI

Obi-Wan Kenobi is one of the more beloved of the “Star Wars” characters. Kenobi was portrayed by two fabulous actors in the series of films. As a young man he is played by Scottish actor Ewan McGregor, and as an older man he is played by Alec Guinness.

59. Mass. MLB team : BOS

The Boston Red Sox is one of the most successful Major League Baseball teams and so commands a large attendance, but only when on the road. The relatively small capacity of Boston’s Fenway Park, the team’s home since 1912, has dictated that every game the Red Sox has played there has been a sell-out since May of 2003. I recently had the pleasure of touring Fenway Park. It’s quite a place …

60. “All systems go!” : A-OK

Our term “A-OK” is supposedly an abbreviation for “A(ll systems are) OK”, and arose in the sixties during the Space Program.

61. __ Beta Kappa : PHI

Phi Beta Kappa was the first collegiate Greek fraternity in the US, founded in 1776 at the College of William and Mary. The organization served as a model for future collegiate fraternities and sororities, although in the 19th century Phi Beta Kappa distanced itself from the fraternal focus and transformed into the honor society that it is today, recognizing academic excellence. The initials Phi Beta Kappa stand for “philosophia biou kybernētēs”, which translates into “philosophy is the guide of life”. The symbol of the Phi Beta Kappa Society is a golden key.

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Like aged cheddar : SHARP
6. Three-dimensional : CUBIC
11. Clavell’s “__-Pan” : TAI
14. Down-yielding duck : EIDER
15. IRA-establishing legislation : ERISA
16. __ Tin Tin : RIN
17. Carry only a carry-on, say : TRAVEL LIGHT
19. “__ had one job!” : YOU
20. Bottom edge of a dress : HEM
21. Slithery swimmer : EEL
22. Bacteria in food recalls : E COLI
24. MLB’s National League nickname (because it was founded first) : SENIOR CIRCUIT
29. “Of course” : YES
30. Least fresh : OLDEST
31. Rainbow-shaped : ARCED
34. Five-time Silver Slugger Award-winning catcher Joe : MAUER
35. The 2% in 2% milk : FAT
38. Nobel physicist Niels : BOHR
39. Tense with excitement … and a hint to the ends of the four longest puzzle answers : WIRED
40. Vague amount : SOME
41. Wonderment : AWE
42. Funeral rite heaps : PYRES
43. Aleppo’s land : SYRIA
44. Martin of “Route 66” : MILNER
46. Buddhist discipline : ZEN
47. Unscrupulous sales tactic : BAIT-AND-SWITCH
51. Takes a break : RESTS
52. Ill. neighbor : IND
53. Piece of history : ERA
56. Framed works : ART
57. Chaw in a cheek : TOBACCO PLUG
62. Knight’s title : SIR
63. Downloadable read : E-BOOK
64. Moan and groan : WHINE
65. “Listen up!” : HEY!
66. Takes a chance on : RISKS
67. Vetoes : NIXES

Down

1. Meyers of late-night TV : SETH
2. Put on the payroll : HIRE
3. Frequent Yosemite photographer Ansel : ADAMS
4. Gun, as an engine : REV
5. Fussed in front of a mirror : PREENED
6. Upright violin kin : CELLO
7. Ocean State sch. : URI
8. The __ Dipper : BIG
9. “Kinda” suffix : -ISH
10. Party food provider : CATERER
11. Seek a spot on, as a sports team : TRY OUT FOR
12. Garlicky mayo : AIOLI
13. Alaskan native : INUIT
18. Floral garlands : LEIS
23. IV units : CCS
25. Ogler : EYER
26. Loud crowds : ROARERS
27. Crossword puzzle list : CLUES
28. Fingered in a lineup, briefly : ID’ED
31. Old hoops org. : ABA
32. Line of seats : ROW
33. Mutual attraction in a relationship : CHEMISTRY
34. Stuck in the mud : MIRED
36. “__ dreaming?” : AM I
37. Earl Grey, e.g. : TEA
39. Casino mogul Steve : WYNN
40. Lip-__: mouth the words : SYNC
42. Wall surface : PLASTER
43. Land a plane : SET DOWN
45. Hairy Addams cousin : ITT
46. Galvanizing metal : ZINC
47. Audacious : BRASH
48. Eagle’s nest : AERIE
49. Trimmable candle parts : WICKS
50. DNA structure : HELIX
54. Ancient character : RUNE
55. Long, long time : AGES
58. __-Wan Kenobi : OBI
59. Mass. MLB team : BOS
60. “All systems go!” : A-OK
61. __ Beta Kappa : PHI

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18 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 19 Jun 2018, Tuesday”

  1. LAT: 7:31, no errors. Newsday: 5:22, no errors. WSJ: 8:47, no errors. Jones: 16:37, no errors (but I spent some time going through the alphabet, looking for better choices for a couple of squares that were personal Naticks). Croce at 4:00 (if I have time) …

    1. So I made time to do the latest Tim Croce crossword: At 1:05:53, I filled in the last square, but I waited another hour and twenty minutes before checking my answers (all of which turned out to be correct) because I really wasn’t sure of that final letter. For once, I have a nit to pick with Mr. Croce; the clues for the entries intersecting there are unusually deceptive and very nearly wrong. Still, as always, I enjoyed his puzzle.

  2. When I wrote, yesterday, on the comment on the passing on, of Argyle – the avatar of D. Scott Nichols, – on the L. A. Crossword Corner, — a commentator on another blog, I was not aware that Bill and Carrie also knew of him – but were not aware of his passing on, on April 30, this year. We often know very little of our guru bloggers, except that which they let escape of their own accord.

    Having reached that sort of age milestone, myself, …. I have decided, at the risk of sounding crass, …. to link some of the details of Argyle’s life. It is another web site, that I don’t visit very often – just yesterday, when Bill’s site was down, temporarily. It was a Monday, and Argyle’s normal blogging shift-day, and it was blogged by Boomer, the husband of CC Burnickel. I wondered how Argyle was doing – I knew he had been sick – and I decided to do some research and find out his latest prognosis …. and I came across his obituary….

    But I am just as fascinated by the philosophy of what makes a man, or woman – a person, devote themselves, to a passion that overtakes their entire life, especially in their golden years, when there are so many other things that attract your time, energy and attention ??

    To take up, and throw to the world the entirety of your accumulated wisdom, and experience of the years …. especially when you could be making money off of it ?? Lawyers, accountants, and certainly doctors don’t do it – as a rule – those are the most profitable years of your life …. when your dendrites are full and even overflowing and suddenly the whole world is at your feet , enchanted and awed !! And blogging, expecially, unlike teaching a tutee or a classroom – is such a thankless task … you never know who is reading or listening to you …. There is no feedback, no thanks, no appreciation or clapping …. and I’m sure that person might think – Is it all so worth it ??

    But, many selfless geniuses do it, and leave behind a memory …. and touch some many lives, as they leave us behind.
    All this Dear Bill, is just as much for you, as it is for Argyle.

    Although you are two different personalities, and two entirely different styles and lives – I feel I should do this, because I don’t know, when the time comes – whether I will be around in your case ….. so better sooner than later.

    We will remember you, just as lovingly.

    More in my next post…

  3. 8:44. I had an easier time with this than the NYT today. ABA is indeed an old hoops org. and is likely what the setter was referring to. Interestingly, if he had clued it as “Old court org.” , it could have been either one.

    @Carrie
    I like FARSIghted. Good one. All I could think of was a “rack oF RENCHes, but I couldn’t find “rench” as an an alternate spelling to “wrench”. Oh well since you’ve thrown down the gauntlet – How about someone who is a stranGER MAN than I am (nevermind that person doesn’t exist). Now I’m FINNISH thinking about it….. 🙂

    @Vidwan –
    I do remember Argyle posting here periodically, usually to correct Bill on a typo or perhaps to point out another element of a theme. I never knew who he was, however.

    Best –

  4. 8:44. I had an easier time with this than the NYT today. ABA is indeed an old hoops org. and is likely what the setter was referring to. Interestingly, if he had clued it as “Old court org.” , it could have been either one.

    @Carrie
    I like FARSIghted. Good one. All I could think of was a “rack oF RENCHes, but I couldn’t find “rench” as an an alternate spelling to “wrench”. Oh well since you’ve thrown down the gauntlet – How about someone who was a stranGER MAN than I am (nevermind that person doesn’t exist)? Now I’m FINNISH thinking about it….. 🙂

    @Vidwan –
    I do remember Argyle posting here periodically, usually to correct Bill on a typo or perhaps to point out another element of a theme. I never knew who he was, however.

    Best –

  5. Apologies – somehow I just posted twice. No worries – only one is required reading. If you read both, you get extra credit…

  6. Regarding the obituary of Argyle – the avatar of D. Scott Nichols …..

    This is the original commentary and obituary by Madame C C Burnikel ( Please note the correct spelling of the last name – ). It is heartfelt, sincere, honest and obvioulsy it is impossible to be improved upon….
    Also a link to his obituary from the funeral home, and other comments from fellow readers and bloggers.

    While Argyle and Bill, are two, totally different, but kindred souls …. their ancestors, ( I feel – ) came from that same little part of the world. Argyle, I felt was more Welsh or Scottish stock, while Bill is indubitably Irish … and Argyle, unlike Bill, had no prior experience or professional life style in constructing crossword puzzles – though he did construct 7 puzzles for the LA Times, and 2 for the NY Times …. he lived in a little town of Argyle ( hence, the avatar name – ) in upstate NY, and more or less, lived alone, in a mileu where he had been born. (Btw, I had to look up the town on Google maps – ).

    Here, is the The life story of Argyle, crossword blogger

  7. Jeff, after two long posts – highly overdone …. I had to add this ….

    I read both of your posts- and proofread both, and find two errors in one of them.
    Now, if you’ll just wire me a hundred dollars cash ….. maybe, I will tell you ….

    Reminds me, of a joke, …. once a schoolboy wrote to John Grisham, and said he had come across a big misteak (!) in one of Grisham’s books. which had obviously been skipped or missed by the proofreader. Now, if John would just send him a hundred dollars, in the mail, the boy said, he would tell him of the error by return mail ….. and save him a lot of embarassment.

    And Grisham replied, by mail, and advised the schoolboy to look up the word, ‘extortion’ …….

    have a nice day, folks, and thanks Heidi.

  8. When you’re in your 70s, half your friends are dead – but they’re still your friends. Frank Zappa was against nostalgia, but he didn’t live long enough to appreciate it.
    As far as crosswords late in life, if you have physical problems, you can do them on your back – with a Flair, which doesn’t run out, if not with flair.

    I Googled ROARERS, an expression I wasn’t familiar with. This enabled me to fill in the missing letter in MILNEr and in MaUER, two dudes I didn’t know. Wanted PRimpED for PREENED. Had EbOLI before E COLI. Eboli is the city “Christ stopped at,” meaning He stopped short of Eboli, and didn’t get there to civilize it.

  9. Hello gang! 🙃
    No errors. I had SOX before BOS.

    Hey Glenn! You beat Bill’s time again! It seems that happened fairly recently too — is this a trend I hadn’t noticed?? 😮

    Okay — I hear something– apparently my Airbnb guests finally arrived! I knew they’d be checking in after midnight, and I left everything ready for them– but it’s always rather odd to have strangers walking on your property in the wee hours…

    Vidwan, thank you for the link! Argyle seems to have been a wonderful man.

    Jeff, here’s one: my dog is not a purebred setter; he’s an IrisHMONGrel… Hmong, a language of Laos, as you may know. I figure that this is most easily done with short language names…. and yet I can’t come up with anything for Lao…🤔

    Be well~~🌺🌻🌷

  10. what did you do to the website? It is so difficult to search for previous puzzles from days, weeks, or months ago!!

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