LA Times Crossword Answers 1 Jul 2018, Sunday

Advertisement

[ad_above_grid]

Advertisement

Advertisement

Constructed by: Gail Grabowski
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Cool Comfort

Themed answers each comprise two words, the first ending with the letter A, and the second starting with the letter C:

  • 115D. Coolers, briefly, that span two words in the nine longest answers : ACS
  • 23A. Bottom of a pie : PIZZA CRUST
  • 25A. Quality bedding material : PIMA COTTON
  • 46A. Where Petaluma is : SONOMA COUNTY
  • 65A. Room in some posh residences : MEDIA CENTER
  • 88A. Tex-Mex dipper : TORTILLA CHIP
  • 112A. Oakland-based environmental group : SIERRA CLUB
  • 114A. 2009 Meryl Streep role : JULIA CHILD
  • 37D. Struggling student’s option : EXTRA CREDIT
  • 42D. Game player’s purchase : SEGA CONSOLE

Bill’s time: 20m 04s

Bill’s errors: 0

Advertisement

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

5. Iridescent stones : OPALS

An opal is often described as having a milky iridescence, known as “opalescence”.

10. Broadway restaurant founder : SARDI

Sardi’s is a famous restaurant in the Theater District of Manhattan that was opened in 1927 by Italian immigrant Vincent Sardi, Sr. Sardi’s is famous for attracting celebrities who sometimes pose for caricatures that are then displayed on the restaurant’s walls. After the death of actress and director Antoinette Perry in 1946, her friend and partner Brock Pemberton was having lunch at Sardi’s and came up with idea of a theater award that could be presented in Perry’s honor. The award was to be called the Tony Award. In fact, Vincent Sardi, Sr. was presented with a special Tony at the first award ceremony, held in 1947.

19. Bizet’s “Habanera,” e.g. : ARIA

When Georges Bizet wrote his famous opera “Carmen”, he used the melody of what he thought was an old folk song as a theme in the lovely aria “ Habanera”. Not long after he finished “Carmen” he discovered that the folk song was in fact a piece that had been written by another composer, who had died just ten years before “Carmen” was published. Fittingly, Bizet added a note to the score, declaring the original source.

20. Frequent co-star of Sly : TALIA

The actress Talia Shire is best-known for playing Rocky’s wife Adrian in the “Rocky” series of movies. She also played Connie, the daughter of Don Corleone, in “The Godfather” films. Shire is the sister of movie director Francis Ford Coppola and the aunt of actor Nicolas Cage. Her son is the actor Jason Schwartzman.

If ever there was a movie that defines a career breakthrough for an actor, it would have to be “Rocky” for Sylvester Stallone. Stallone was a struggling actor in 1975 when a Muhammad Ali fight inspired Stallone to write a screenplay for a boxing movie, which he did in just three days. His efforts to sell the script went well but for the fact that the interested studios wanted a big name for the lead role, and Stallone was determined to be the star himself. Stallone persevered and “Rocky” was eventually made with him playing title role of Rocky Balboa. The movie won three Oscars, and “Sly” Stallone had arrived …

22. Large volume : TOME

“Tome” first came into English from the Latin “tomus” which means “section of a book”. The original usage in English was for a single volume in a multi-volume work. By the late 16th century, “tome” had come to mean “large book”.

25. Quality bedding material : PIMA COTTON

Pima is a soft cotton that is very durable and absorbent. Pima cotton is named after the Pima Native Americans who first cultivated it in this part of the world.

27. Gourmet gastropod : SNAIL

Snails and slugs are referred to collectively as gastropods. There are many, many species of gastropods, found both on land and in the sea. Gastropods with shells are generally described as snails, and those species without shells are referred to as slugs.

34. Historic 1804 contest : DUEL

Aaron Burr was the third vice-president of the US, and served under Thomas Jefferson. In the final year of his term in office, Burr fought an illegal duel and killed his political rival Alexander Hamilton. Burr wasn’t brought to justice, but he did pay the price politically. Thomas Jefferson dropped him from his ticket in the election held the following year.

Alexander Hamilton was one of America’s Founding Fathers, chief of staff to General George Washington and the first Secretary of the Treasury. It was Hamilton who established the nation’s first political party, the Federalist Party. He is also famous for fighting a duel with Vice President Aaron Burr, which resulted in Hamilton’s death a few days later.

35. Texas city in the film “Friday Night Lights” : ODESSA

The city of Odessa, Texas has as its symbol the jack rabbit. This is because from the thirties through the seventies the city hosted a rodeo for roping rabbits. The Humane Society applied pressure and the city did away with the tradition in 1977.

“Friday Night Lights” is a 2004 film based on a 1990 book “Friday Night Lights: A Town, a Team, and a Dream” by H. G. Bissinger. The film stars Billy Bob Thornton as a high school football coach. I haven’t seen the movie, but thoroughly enjoyed “Friday Night Lights”, the subsequent TV series.

38. Org. with a New London academy : USCG

The Coast Guard Academy (USCGA) is located in New London, Connecticut. The USCGA was founded in 1876 as the School of Instruction of the Revenue Cutter Service. The main training vessel used by the academy is the USCGC Eagle, a tall ship formerly known as the Horst Wessel that was received from Germany in 1946 as a war reparation.

46. Where Petaluma is : SONOMA COUNTY

The California city of Petaluma is located north of San Francisco. The name “Petaluma” comes from the Coast Miwok phrase “péta lúuma” meaning “hill backside”, which is probably a reference to the nearby Sonoma Mountain.

52. For hire to sire : AT STUD

The word “stud”, meaning “a male horse kept for breeding”, is derived from the Old English word “stod”, which described a whole herd of horses. The term “stud” can be used figuratively for a “ladies’ man”.

57. How much sautéing is done : IN OIL

“Sauté” is a French word. The literal translation from the French is “jumped” or “bounced”, a reference to the tossing of food while cooking it in a frying pan.

59. Org. founded on the 100th anniversary of Lincoln’s birth : NAACP

The full name of the NAACP, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, is remarkable in that it actually still uses the offensive term “colored people”. The NAACP was founded in 1909, by a group that included suffragette and journalist Mary White Ovington, wealthy socialist William English Walling, and civil rights activist Henry Moskowitz. Another member of the founding group was W. E. B. Du Bois, the first African-American to earn a doctorate at Harvard University. The date chosen for the founding of the NAACP was February 12th, 1909, the 100th anniversary of the birth of President Abraham Lincoln, the man most visibly associated with the emancipation of African-American slaves.

60. “Dark of the Moon” poet : TEASDALE

Sara Teasdale was a poet from St. Louis, Missouri although she spent much of her adult life in New York City. Examples of Teasdale’s most famous poems are “There Will Come Soft Rains” and “I Shall Not Care”. Teasdale committed suicide in 1933 by taking an overdose of sleeping pills.

62. Hummus scooper : PITA

The lovely dip/spread called hummus usually contains mashed chickpeas, tahini, olive oil, lemon juice, salt and garlic. The name “hummus” is an Arabic word for “chickpeas”.

63. Fam. tree member : DESC

A descendant (desc.) is found in a family tree (fam. tree).

75. Amazon predator : ANACONDA

Anacondas are native to the tropical regions of South America. The green anaconda is one of the world’s largest snakes, growing to 17 feet long and weighing up to 550 pounds! Anacondas are not venomous, and prefer to kill their prey by coiling around it and then squeeeeeezing …

77. Brand with a Creamy Vodka sauce : PREGO

The Prego brand of pasta sauce is owned by the Campbell Soup Company. It is actually based on the family recipe of one of the company’s chefs. “Prego” literally means “I pray” in Italian, but it translates in English best as “you’re welcome” when it is used after a “thank you” (“grazie”, in Italian).

79. 1954 Ford debut : T-BIRD

Ford manufactured the Thunderbird (T-Bird) from 1955 to 2005. Originally a two-seater sporty convertible, the T-Bird was introduced as a competitor to Chevrolet’s new sports car, the Corvette.

81. Great Plains tribe : KIOWA

The Kiowa Native Americans have a name that means “Principal People”. Most of the Kiowas today live on a reservation in southwestern Oklahoma.

83. “It’s not my first __!” : RODEO

“Not my first rodeo” means “not the first time I’ve done this”. The phrase started to be used after country singer Vern Gosdin released the song “This Ain’t My First Rodeo” in 1990. Gosdin said that he’d first heard the idiom from a workman who added an extra room over his garage.

86. Hugs, on cards : OOO

In the sequence letter sequence “XOX”, the X represents a kiss, and the O a hug. “OOO” is a string of hugs, and “XXX” a string of kisses. Hugs and kisses …

87. Manning of football : ELI

Eli Manning plays as quarterback for the New York Giants. Eli’s brother Peyton Manning retired from football as the quarterback for the Denver Broncos in 2015. Eli and Peyton’s father is Archie Manning, who was also a successful NFL quarterback. Eli, Peyton and Archie co-authored a book for children titles “Family Huddle” in 2009. It describes the Mannings playing football together as young boys.

88. Tex-Mex dipper : TORTILLA CHIP

“Tortilla” translates literally from Spanish as “little cake”.

100. “She Believes __”: Kenny Rogers hit : IN ME

Singer Kenny Rogers is from Houston, and now lives on his estate in Colbert, Georgia. The list of hit songs recorded by Rogers includes “Lucille”, “Coward of the County”, “We’ve Got Tonight” (with Sheena Easton), and “Islands in the Stream” (with Dolly Parton).

“She Believes in Me” was a big crossover hit for Kenny Rogers in 1978. A country song that made it big in the pop charts as a single, it also appears on his album “The Gambler”.

104. Like parts of the Great Plains : SEMIARID

The Great Plains lie between the Mississippi River and the Rocky Mountains in North America. This vast grassland is known as “the Prairies” in Canada.

112. Oakland-based environmental group : SIERRA CLUB

John Muir was a famous American naturalist, although he was born in Scotland. Muir founded the Sierra Club in 1892. He published “My First Summer in the Sierra” in 1911, which described one of Muir’s favorite places in the country, the Sierra Nevada range in California.

114. 2009 Meryl Streep role : JULIA CHILD

Julia Child was an American chef who is recognized for bringing French cuisine to the American public. During WWII, Julia Child joined the OSS (Office of Strategic Services), the predecessor to the CIA. She worked for the OSS in Washington, Ceylon and China. While in the OSS, she met her husband Paul Child who was also an OSS employee. Paul joined the Foreign Service after the war, and it was his posting to France that created the opportunity for Julie to learn about French cuisine. If you haven’t seen it, I highly, highly recommend the movie “Julie & Julia”, one of the best films of 2009. Meryl Streep does a fabulous job playing the larger-than-life Julia Child.

“Julie & Julia” is a wonderful 2009 Nora Ephron film that juxtaposes the lives of celebrity chef Julia Childs and home cook/blogger Julie Powell. Childs is played by Meryl Streep, and Powell by Amy Adams. Ephron’s screenplay is based on two nonfiction books: Child’s autobiography “My Life in France”, and Powell’s memoir “Julie and Julia: My Year of Cooking Dangerously”. Highly recommended …

116. Author Dinesen : ISAK

“Isak Dinesen” was the pen name of the Danish author Baroness Karen Blixen. Blixen’s most famous title by far is “Out of Africa”, her account of the time she spent living in Kenya.

118. Part of PGA: Abbr. : ASSOC

The Professional Golfers’ Association (PGA) was founded in 1916 and today has its headquarters (unsurprisingly) in Florida, where so many golfers live. Back in 1916, the PGA was based in New York City.

119. Singer on a 2007 Black Heritage postage stamp, familiarly : ELLA

The Black History Series of stamps is now the longest-running of the US Postal Service’s commemorative collections. The first in the series was issued in 1974, and featured the image of Harriet Tubman. The list of African-Americans also honored includes Martin Luther King, Jr., Jackie Robinson, Malcolm X, Langston Hughes, Thurgood Marshall and Ella Fitzgerald.

Down

2. Shillelagh’s land : ERIN

A “shillelagh” is a wooden walking stick that, according to Irish folklore, was often used as a weapon, as a club. The term “shillelagh” is an anglicized corruption of “sail éille” meaning “thonged willow”. The spelling of this corruption somehow got confused over the years with the village of Shillelagh in County Wicklow. The name of the village is unrelated to the walking stick, and rather comes from the Irish “Síol Éalaigh” meaning “people descended from Élothach”, i.e. descended from Élothach mac Fáelchon, one of the Irish kings.

3. “__ With a ‘Z'”: 1972 TV special : LIZA

“Liza with a ‘Z’” is a TV film of a 1972 concert given by Liza Minnelli. The film was co-produced by Bob Fosse, who had also directed Minnelli in the very successful film “Cabaret” that was released just a few months before the concert.

5. Non-Rx : OTC

Over-the-counter (OTC) drugs don’t need a prescription (Rx).

6. City awarded the 2024 Summer Olympic Games : PARIS

When Paris hosts the Summer Olympics in 2024, it will become only the second city to host the Olympics three time (London hosted in 1908, 1948 and 2012).

7. Donor drive target : ALUM

An alumnus (plural “alumni”) is a graduate or former student of a school or college. The female form is “alumna” (plural “alumnae”). The term comes into English from Latin, in which an alumnus is a foster-son or pupil. “Alum” is an informal term used for either an alumna or an alumnus.

8. Sylvester’s problem : LISP

Sylvester J. Pussycat is also known as Puddy Tat, and is a character who appeared in “Looney Tunes” and “Merrie Melodies” cartoons. Sylvester is the cat who is often trying to get the better of Tweety Bird, Speedy Gonzales and Hippety Hopper. Sylvester’s trademark line is the exclamation “Sufferin’ succotash!”, which emphasizes the characters pronounced lisp.

10. Palatable : SAPID

Something that is “sapid” is “tasty, savory”. The opposite to “sapid” is “insipid”, meaning “without taste, bland”.

12. Super Bowl XXXIV champs : RAMS

The St. Louis Rams were based in Cleveland from 1936-45, Los Angeles from 1946-94 and St. Louis from 1995 to the present day. The Rams have only won the Super Bowl once, Super Bowl XXXIV at the end of the 1999 season. The Rams defeated the Tennessee Titans 23-16.

13. 24 horas : DIA

In Spanish, there are 24 “horas” (hours) in a “día” (day).

15. Fifth-century Roman Empire foe : ATTILA

In his day, Attila the Hun was the most feared enemy of the Roman Empire, until he died in 453 AD. Attila was the leader of the Hunnic Empire of central Europe and was famous for invading much of the continent. However, he never directly attacked Rome.

18. They’re often cooped up : HENS

The Old English word “cypa”, meaning “basket”, evolved in the 14th century to the word “coop” to describe a small cage for poultry. We still use that word today.

29. Mumbai melody : RAGA

Raga isn’t really a type of music, but has been described as the “tonal framework” in which Indian classical music is composed. Ravi Shankar was perhaps the most famous raga virtuoso (to us Westerners). Western rock music with a heavy Indian influence might be called raga rock.

Mumbai is the most populous city in India, and the second most populous city in the world (after Shanghai). The name of the city was changed from Bombay to Mumbai in 1995.

40. Mil. authority : CMD

Command (Cmd.)

42. Game player’s purchase : SEGA CONSOLE

Sega is a Japanese video game company headquartered in Tokyo. Sega actually started out 1940 in the US as Standard Games and was located in Honolulu, Hawaii. The owners moved the operation to Tokyo in 1951 and renamed the company to Service Games. The name “Sega” is a combination of the first two letters of the words “Se-rvice” and “Ga-mes”.

47. “__ Mio” : O SOLE

“O sole mio” is a famous Italian song from Naples, written in 1898. The song’s lyrics are usually sung in the original Neapolitan, as opposed to Italian. The title translates from Neapolitan into “My Sun” (and not into “O, My Sun” as one might expect). It’s a love song, sung by a young man declaring that there is a sun brighter than that in the sky, the sun that is his lover’s face. Awww …

48. 2002 Nobel Peace Prize laureate : CARTER

President Jimmy Carter was the 39th President, and the only US president to receive the Nobel Peace Prize after leaving office (Presidents Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson and Barack Obama have also been so honored, but while in office).

49. View from much of U.S. Highway 101 : OCEAN

US Route 101 runs in the north-south direction along the west coast of the country, through California, Oregon and Washington. US 101 is an important thoroughfare here in the San Francisco Bay Area, but along most of its length, traffic tends to use the parallel Interstate 5.

52. Samaritan’s offering : AID

“The Good Samaritan” is a parable told by Jesus that can be read in the Gospel of Luke. According to the story, a Jewish traveler is robbed and beaten and left for dead at the side of the road. A priest happens by and sees the poor man, but does not stop to help. A fellow Jewish traveler also passes and refuses to help. A third man stops and gives aid. This kind person is a Samaritan, a native of Samaria. Back then Jewish and Samarian people were said to generally despise each other, and yet here a detested creature gives aid. Jesus told to the story to a self-righteous lawyer, the intent being (I assume) to shake up his self-righteousness.

66. Last Supper question : IS IT I?

At the Last Supper, Jesus told his apostles that one of them would betray him that day. According to the Gospel of Matthew:

And they were exceeding sorrowful, and began every one of them to say unto him, Lord, is it I?

67. Meditative discipline : TAI CHI

More correctly called t‘ai chi ch‘uan, tai chi is a martial art that is mostly practiced to improve overall health and increase longevity.

68. Long, thin mushroom : ENOKI

Enokitake (also known as “enoki”) are long and thin white mushrooms often added to soups or salads.

71. Barbecue fare : KABOBS

The term “kebab” (also “kabob”) covers a wide variety of meat dishes that originated in Persia. In the West, we usually use “kebab” when talking about shish kebab, which is meat (often lamb) served on a skewer. “Shish” comes from the Turkish word for “skewer”.

79. Protection from the elements : TARPS

Originally, tarpaulins were made from canvas covered in tar that rendered the material waterproof. The word “tarpaulin” comes from “tar” and “palling”, with “pall” meaning “heavy cloth covering”.

81. “Mayor” author : KOCH

“Mayor” is a 1984 autobiography by former New York City mayor Ed Koch.

85. Prefix with ware : MAL-

Malware is software and program code that is created to intentionally disrupt and exploit computer systems. Viruses, worms, trojan horses and spyware are all covered by the term. “Malware” is short for “malicious software”.

89. “C’est magnifique!” : OOH LA LA!

“C’est magnifique!” is French for “It is magnificent!”

90. Big name in casual garb : LEVI

Levi Strauss was the founder of the first company in the world to manufacture blue jeans. Levi Strauss & Co. opened in 1853 in San Francisco. Strauss and his business partner were awarded a patent in 1873 for the use of copper rivets to strengthen points of strain on working pants.

96. Former car-financing org. : GMAC

“GMAC” stands for “General Motors Acceptance Corporation”. General Motors has only a small stake in GMAC now, and indeed the name has been officially changed to Ally Bank. You and I, we are the biggest shareholders in GMAC/Ally today, since the US government gave the bank $12.5 billion to bail it out in 2008-2009.

100. Beat around the bush, e.g. : IDIOM

To beat around the bush is to prevaricate, to avoid coming to the point. The phrase originated with bird hunting in which locals were employed by the aristocratic hunters to beat the bushes, rousing the birds so that they could be shot as they flew off. So, beating around the bush was a preamble to the slaughter, in a sense a prevarication before getting to the main event.

102. Response to un capitán : SI SI!

In Spanish, one might give the response “Sí sí” (yes, yes) to “un capitán” (a captain).

105. Just shy of shut : AJAR

Our word “ajar” is thought to come from Scottish dialect, in which “a char” means “slightly open”.

106. Trojan Horse, for one : RUSE

The ancient city of Troy was located on the west coast of modern-day Turkey. The Trojan War of Greek mythology was precipitated by the elopement of Helen, the wife of the king of Sparta, with Paris of Troy. The war itself largely consisted of a nine-year siege of Troy by the Greeks. We know most about the final year of that siege, as it is described extensively in Homer’s “Iliad”. The city eventually fell when the Greeks hid soldiers inside the Trojan Horse, which the Trojans brought inside the city’s walls. Beware of Greeks bearing gifts …

107. Rick’s “kid” : ILSA

“Here’s looking at you, kid” is a line spoken in “Casablanca” by Rick (Humphrey Bogart) to Ilsa (Ingrid Bergman).

111. 1944 turning point : D-DAY

The Normandy landings on D-Day in 1944 took place along a 50-mile stretch of the Normandy coast divided into five sectors: Utah, Omaha, Gold, Juno and Sword. The worst fighting by far took place on Omaha Beach, a sector assigned to the US Army that was transported by elements of the US Navy and the Royal Navy.

115. Coolers, briefly, that span two words in the nine longest answers : ACS

Air conditioner (AC)

Advertisement

[ad_below_googlies]

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Tip off : TELL
5. Iridescent stones : OPALS
10. Broadway restaurant founder : SARDI
15. Fancy window feature : ARCH
19. Bizet’s “Habanera,” e.g. : ARIA
20. Frequent co-star of Sly : TALIA
21. From the top : AGAIN
22. Large volume : TOME
23. Bottom of a pie : PIZZA CRUST
25. Quality bedding material : PIMA COTTON
27. Gourmet gastropod : SNAIL
28. Puts at risk : IMPERILS
30. Ring components : ONIONS
31. Fish caught in pots : EELS
33. Stock ending? : -ADE
34. Historic 1804 contest : DUEL
35. Texas city in the film “Friday Night Lights” : ODESSA
38. Org. with a New London academy : USCG
41. Sites with jets : AIR BASES
45. Leading the line : NEXT
46. Where Petaluma is : SONOMA COUNTY
50. Switchboard connection: Abbr. : EXT
51. Mil. driller : SGT
52. For hire to sire : AT STUD
53. It may be a lot : ACRE
54. Wistful remark : OH GEE
56. Burn the toast, say : ERR
57. How much sautéing is done : IN OIL
58. Hate the idea of : DREAD
59. Org. founded on the 100th anniversary of Lincoln’s birth : NAACP
60. “Dark of the Moon” poet : TEASDALE
62. Hummus scooper : PITA
63. Fam. tree member : DESC
64. Religious faction : SECT
65. Room in some posh residences : MEDIA CENTER
69. Made off with : TOOK
72. Barely done : RARE
74. Road closing? : -STER
75. Amazon predator : ANACONDA
77. Brand with a Creamy Vodka sauce : PREGO
79. 1954 Ford debut : T-BIRD
81. Great Plains tribe : KIOWA
82. Unc, to Dad : SIB
83. “It’s not my first __!” : RODEO
84. Choral part : ALTO
85. Teaching model : MOCK-UP
86. Hugs, on cards : OOO
87. Manning of football : ELI
88. Tex-Mex dipper : TORTILLA CHIP
91. Botch : FLUB
92. Carriers of carriers : PET SHOPS
94. Pre-college, briefly : ELHI
95. Female folklore fiend : OGRESS
97. Scoffing sounds : HAHS
98. Rel. title : REV
100. “She Believes __”: Kenny Rogers hit : IN ME
101. Lash out at : ASSAIL
104. Like parts of the Great Plains : SEMIARID
108. Invited : ASKED
112. Oakland-based environmental group : SIERRA CLUB
114. 2009 Meryl Streep role : JULIA CHILD
116. Author Dinesen : ISAK
117. Ruin, with “up” : LOUSE
118. Part of PGA: Abbr. : ASSOC
119. Singer on a 2007 Black Heritage postage stamp, familiarly : ELLA
120. Is just right : FITS
121. Bring to a boil : ANGER
122. Lots of paper : REAMS
123. Overly curious : NOSY

Down

1. Pub hardware : TAPS
2. Shillelagh’s land : ERIN
3. “__ With a ‘Z'”: 1972 TV special : LIZA
4. Like the most summery day : LAZIEST
5. Non-Rx : OTC
6. City awarded the 2024 Summer Olympic Games : PARIS
7. Donor drive target : ALUM
8. Sylvester’s problem : LISP
9. Fill completely : SATE
10. Palatable : SAPID
11. Well-coordinated : AGILE
12. Super Bowl XXXIV champs : RAMS
13. 24 horas : DIA
14. On trial : IN COURT
15. Fifth-century Roman Empire foe : ATTILA
16. Revolution prefix : ROTO-
17. “Seriously?” : C’MON!
18. They’re often cooped up : HENS
24. Pub round : ALES
26. Separately : ONE BY ONE
29. Mumbai melody : RAGA
32. Altar sacrifice, at times? : LAST NAME
34. Enjoyed some courses : DINED
35. Initial stages : ONSETS
36. College offering : DEGREE
37. Struggling student’s option : EXTRA CREDIT
38. Freed, in a way : UNTIED
39. iTunes Store category : SOUL
40. Mil. authority : CMD
41. Intangible quality : AURA
42. Game player’s purchase : SEGA CONSOLE
43. Suit : EXEC
44. Part of a plan : STEP
47. “__ Mio” : O SOLE
48. 2002 Nobel Peace Prize laureate : CARTER
49. View from much of U.S. Highway 101 : OCEAN
52. Samaritan’s offering : AID
55. Can’t get out of it : HAS TO
58. Like many soup veggies : DICED
61. Performer’s place : STAGE
62. Keep the beat? : PATROL
63. Use, as one’s resources : DRAW UPON
66. Last Supper question : IS IT I?
67. Meditative discipline : TAI CHI
68. Long, thin mushroom : ENOKI
70. Awful : ODIOUS
71. Barbecue fare : KABOBS
73. Water-absorbing plant part : ROOT HAIR
76. Tube top : CAP
77. Kitchen job : PREP
78. Cast assignment : ROLE
79. Protection from the elements : TARPS
80. Short orders? : BLTS
81. “Mayor” author : KOCH
85. Prefix with ware : MAL-
89. “C’est magnifique!” : OOH LA LA!
90. Big name in casual garb : LEVI
91. Air out : FRESHEN
93. Predatory fish with an acute sense of smell : SHARKS
96. Former car-financing org. : GMAC
98. Green word? : REUSE
99. Glowing piece : EMBER
100. Beat around the bush, e.g. : IDIOM
101. “Get real!” : AS IF!
102. Response to un capitán : SI SI!
103. Administrative hub : SEAT
104. Wallop : SLUG
105. Just shy of shut : AJAR
106. Trojan Horse, for one : RUSE
107. Rick’s “kid” : ILSA
109. Drug bust unit : KILO
110. Some annexes : ELLS
111. 1944 turning point : D-DAY
113. Rip off : CON
115. Coolers, briefly, that span two words in the nine longest answers : ACS

Advertisement

[ad_below_clue_list]