LA Times Crossword Answers 9 Jul 2018, Monday

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Constructed by: Gail Grabowski & Bruce Venzke
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: From Time to Time

Themed answers both start and end with words that often follow TIME:

  • 48A. On occasion … and how 20-, 25- and 43-Across go? : FROM TIME TO TIME
  • 20A. Self-inking device for check endorsements : SIGNATURE STAMP (time signature & time stamp)
  • 25A. Coins-for-bills device : CHANGE MACHINE (time change & time machine)
  • 43A. Interval before late fees apply : PAYMENT PERIOD (time payment & time period)

Bill’s time: 5m 25s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Driver with a meter : CABBY

We call cabs “taxis”, a word derived from “taximeter cabs” that were introduced in London in 1907. A taximeter was an automated meter designed to record distance travelled and fare to be charged. The term “taximeter” evolved from “taxameter”, with “taxa” being Latin for “tax, charge”.

10. Fraternal letters seen under antlers : BPOE

The Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks (BPOE) was founded in 1868, and is a social club that has about a million members today. It started out as a group of men getting together in a “club” in order to get around the legal opening hours of taverns in New York City. The club took on a new role as it started to look out for poor families of members who passed away. The club now accepts African Americans as members (since the seventies) and women (since the nineties), but atheists still aren’t welcome.

14. City near Orlando : OCALA

The city of Ocala, Florida was founded near a historic village with the same name. In the local Timucua language “Ocala” means “Big Hammock”. Back in the 1890s, Ocala was famous for its oranges, with over one third of that fruit shipped from Florida coming from the city. Also, thoroughbred horse farming in Florida started in Ocala, back in 1943. Some folks today call Ocala the “Horse Capital of the World”, but I bet that’s disputed by others …

15. Mani mate : PEDI

Manicure & pedicure (mani-pedi)

17. Former TWA rival : PAN AM

Pan American World Airways (usually just “Pan Am”) started out as a mail and passenger service between Key West, Florida and Havana, Cuba in 1927. From very early in the company’s life it was the de facto representative air carrier of the United States. For many years Pan Am’s fleet was built around the Boeing 314 Clipper, a long-range flying boat that was one of the largest aircraft around at the time. Pan Am adopted the Clipper as part of its image, even using “clipper” as the call sign for its flights.

18. Hulk’s emotion : RAGE

The comic book hero named “the Hulk” first made an appearance in 1962. The Hulk is the alter ego of reserved and withdraw physicist Bruce Banner. Banner mutates into the Hulk when he gets angry.

19. Sommer of Hollywood : ELKE

Elke Sommer is a German-born actress who was at the height of her success on the silver screen in the sixties. Sommer won a Golden Globe as Most Promising Newcomer Actress for her role opposite Paul Newman in 1964’s “The Prize”. She also sings and has released several albums. Now Sommer focuses on painting, producing artwork that is strongly influenced by the work of Marc Chagall.

20. Self-inking device for check endorsements : SIGNATURE STAMP (time signature & time stamp)

The most common time signature used for Western popular music is 4/4. I guess that’s why said time signature is known as “common time”.

33. Poet Ogden : NASH

Ogden Nash was a poet from Rye, New York who is remembered for his light and quirky verse. Nash had over 500 such works published between 1931 and 1972.

34. Put coins in, as a parking meter : FED

An early patent for a parking meter, dated 1928, was for a device that required the driver of the parked car to connect the battery of his or her car to the meter in order for it to operate!

38. “Are You the One?” network : MTV

“Are You the One?” is an MTV reality show that stars the season with ten men and ten women hoping to find their perfect love match. Nope …

39. In __: as originally placed : SITU

“In situ” is a Latin phrase meaning “in the place”, and we use the term to mean “in the original position”.

43. Interval before late fees apply : PAYMENT PERIOD (time payment & time period)

Back in the day, a loan was sometimes referred to as a time payment plan. A time payment was a loan payment.

46. Western treaty gp. : OAS

The Organization of American States (OAS) has its headquarters in Washington, D.C. Not all of the independent states in the Americas are members. Cuba was barred from participation in the organization after a vote in 196. Honduras had her membership suspended after the country’s 2009 coup.

55. Airline known for tight security : EL AL

El Al Israel Airlines is the flag carrier of Israel. El Al is known for its high levels of security, both on the ground and in the air. Reportedly, the airline’s passenger aircraft have been operating with anti-missile technology for several years.

56. Saint Laurent of fashion : YVES

Yves Saint Laurent (YSL) was a French fashion designer, actually born in Algeria. Saint Laurent started off working as an assistant to Christian Dior at the age of 17. Dior died just four years later, and as a very young man Saint-Laurent was named head of the House of Dior. However, in 1950 Saint Laurent was conscripted into the French Army and ended up in a military hospital after suffering a mental breakdown from the hazing inflicted on him by his fellow soldiers. His treatment included electroshock therapy and administration of sedatives and psychoactive drugs. He was released from hospital, managed to pull his life back together and started his own fashion house. A remarkable story …

57. Kidney-related : RENAL

Something described as “renal” is related to the kidneys. “Ren” is the Latin word for “kidney”.

58. Sonic Dash game publisher : SEGA

Sonic Dash is a game in the Sonic the Hedgehog series published by Sega. It was released in 2013, and I’ve been playing it ever since. Yeah, right …

59. “__ we forget” : LEST

“Lest we forget” is an oft-quoted phrase, one that comes from a poem by Rudyard Kipling called “Recessional”. Kipling wrote the piece on the occasion of the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria in 1897 and used it to express sadness at the waning of the British Empire. The phrase “lest we forget” is used in this context, a warning that the empire will decline. Ever since WWI we’ve been using the words on memorials as a plea not forget the sacrifices made by others in the past.

60. Ernie Banks’ nickname : MR CUB

First baseman Ernie Banks was known as “Mr. Cub”, and played his entire 19-year professional career with the Chicago Cubs. The Cubs retired Banks’ uniform number 14 in 1982, making him the first Cubs player to be so honored. Banks was known for his catchphrase, “It’s a beautiful day for a ballgame … Let’s play two!”, a reference to his love of the game, always wanting to play a doubleheader.

62. Biblical twin : ESAU

Esau was the twin brother of Jacob, the founder of the Israelites. When their mother Rebekah gave birth to the twins “the first emerged red and hairy all over (Esau), with his heel grasped by the hand of the second to come out (Jacob)”. As Esau was the first born, he was entitled to inherit his father’s wealth (it was his “birthright”). Instead, Esau sold his birthright to Jacob for the price of a “mess of pottage” (a meal of lentils).

63. Etsy transaction, e.g. : E-SALE

Etsy.com is an e-commerce website where you can buy and sell the kind of items that you might find at a craft fair.

Down

1. Body cam-wearing law enforcers : COPS

“To cop” was northern British dialect for “to seize, catch”, and is still a slang term meaning “to get hold of, steal”. This verb evolved in the noun “copper”, describing a policeman, someone who catches criminals. “Copper” is often shortened to “cop”.

2. Berry promoted as a superfood : ACAI

Açaí (pronounced “ass-aye-ee”) is a palm tree native to Central and South America. The fruit has become very popular in recent years and its juice is a very fashionable addition to juice mixes and smoothies.

4. Scalds briefly in water, as tomatoes : BLANCHES

In cooking, to blanch a food substance is to plunge it into boiling water for a short time and then plunge it into iced water to stop the cooking process. The literal meaning of “blanch” is “whiten” (from French), but the procedure does not necessarily result in a color change. The desired outcome is usually a softening or a reduction in a strong taste.

5. Steinway competitors : YAMAHAS

The Japanese company Yamaha started out way back in 1888 as a manufacturer of pianos and reed organs. Even though the company has diversified since then, Yamaha’s logo still reflects it musical roots. Said logo is made up of three intersecting tuning forks, and can even be seen on Yamaha motorcycles.

Steinway & Sons is supplier of handmade pianos based in New York City and in Hamburg, Germany. The company was founded in Manhattan in 1853 by German immigrant Henry E. Steinway. One element of Steinway’s business model is to offer a “piano bank” service. Performing artists can “borrow” a particular piano from the bank for a particular concert or tour. About 400 pianos are in the bank, and are located over the world. The value of the bank’s collection of pianos is estimated at over $25 million.

9. Midday snoozes : SIESTAS

We use the word “siesta” to describe a short nap in the early afternoon, and imported the word into English from Spanish. In turn, the Spanish word is derived from the Latin “hora sexta” meaning “the sixth hour”. The idea is that the nap is taken at the sixth hour after dawn.

12. Like a GI doing dishes : ON KP

The initialism “KP” is US military slang that stands for either “kitchen police” or “kitchen patrol”.

21. Sunroof coloring : TINT

A sunroof is a panel in the roof of a car that can be pulled back to let in light and air. A moonroof is similar, but in a moonroof there is an option to slide back a fabric-covered panel to expose a glass panel that allows in light, but not air.

22. Dash gauge : TACH

The tachometer takes its name from the Greek word “tachos” meaning “speed”. A tachometer in a car measures engine revolutions per minute (rpm).

29. “Little” Dickens girl : NELL

“The Old Curiosity Shop” by Charles Dickens tells the story of 14-year-old “Little Nell” Trent and her grandfather who live in the Old Curiosity Shop in London. If you visit London, there actually is an “Old Curiosity Shop”, in Westminster. It is an establishment selling odds and ends, old curiosities, and is believed to have been the inspiration for the shop in the Dickens story. The building has been around since the 1500s, but the name “The Old Curiosity Shop” was added after the book was published.

31. Pipe tobacco packer : TAMP

“To tamp” means “to pack down tightly by tapping”. “Tamp” was originally used to specifically describe the action of packing down sand or dirt around an explosive prior to detonation.

32. Grammy winner Coolidge : RITA

Rita Coolidge is a singer from Lafayette, Tennessee. Coolidge’s second marriage was to fellow singer Kris Kristofferson. Apparently, Coolidge and Kristofferson met on a flight from LA to Memphis. Kristofferson was meant to stay on the plane, and continue on to Knoxville. Instead, he alighted with Ms. Coolidge in Memphis, and they married three years later. Seven years after that, they got divorced.

36. Public defender, for one: Abbr. : ATT

Attorney (att.)

39. Line on Levi’s : SEAM

Levi Strauss was the founder of the first company in the world to manufacture blue jeans. Levi Strauss & Co. opened in 1853 in San Francisco. Strauss and his business partner were awarded a patent in 1873 for the use of copper rivets to strengthen points of strain on working pants.

41. Habeas corpus, e.g. : WRIT

A writ is an order issued by some formal body (these days, usually a court) with the order being in “written” form. Warrants and subpoenas are examples of writs.

The Latin term “habeas corpus” translates literally as “you are to have the body”, and is a legal action (i.e. a writ) that is used to release a prisoner from unlawful detention.

45. 1974 hit with a Spanish title meaning “You are” : ERES TU

We have a big event across Europe every year called the Eurovision Song Contest. Each nation enters one song in competition with each other, and then voters across the whole continent decide on the winner. That’s how ABBA got their big break when they won in 1974 with “Waterloo”. In 1973, Spain’s entry was “Eres tú” (the Spanish for “You Are”) sung by the band Mocedades. “Eres tú” came second in the competition, but should have won in my humble opinion.

48. Cause of a dog’s excessive scratching : FLEA

Fleas are flightless insects, but they sure can jump. Their very specialized hind legs allow them to jump up to 50 times the length of their bodies.

50. Currier’s colleague : IVES

Currier and Ives was a printmaking concern in New York City run by Nathaniel Currier and his partner James Merritt Ives from 1834 to 1907. The firm specialized in making affordable, hand-colored black and white lithographs.

51. Walled land formation : MESA

“What’s the difference between a butte and a mesa?” Both are hills with flat tops, but a mesa has a top that is wider than it is tall. A butte is a much narrower formation, and taller than it is wide.

52. Machu Picchu dweller : INCA

Machu Picchu is known as “The Lost City of the Incas”, and it can be visited on a mountain ridge in Peru, 50 miles northwest of the city of Cuzco in the southeast of the country. The name Machu Picchu means “old peak”. The Inca Trail to Machu Picchu originates about 50 miles from Cusco on the Urubamba River in Peru. It can take travelers about 5 days to trek the full length of the trail, passing through many Incan ruins before reaching the Sun Gate on Machu Picchu mountain. The trail was becoming greatly overused, forcing the Peruvian government to limit the number of people on the trail each day to 500. Book early …

54. Hamburg’s river : ELBE

The River Elbe rises in the Czech Republic and travels over a thousand kilometers before emptying into the North Sea near the port of Hamburg in Germany.

Hamburg is the second largest city in Germany (after Berlin), and the third largest port in Europe (after Rotterdam and Antwerp).

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Driver with a meter : CABBY
6. Ships, to captains : SHES
10. Fraternal letters seen under antlers : BPOE
14. City near Orlando : OCALA
15. Mani mate : PEDI
16. Classify in order of importance : RANK
17. Former TWA rival : PAN AM
18. Hulk’s emotion : RAGE
19. Sommer of Hollywood : ELKE
20. Self-inking device for check endorsements : SIGNATURE STAMP (time signature & time stamp)
23. Stubble spot : CHIN
24. Ankle pic : TAT
25. Coins-for-bills device : CHANGE MACHINE (time change & time machine)
31. Most loyal : TRUEST
33. Poet Ogden : NASH
34. Put coins in, as a parking meter : FED
35. Goes public with : AIRS
36. Say further : ADD
37. Not timid : BOLD
38. “Are You the One?” network : MTV
39. In __: as originally placed : SITU
41. Entirely : WHOLLY
43. Interval before late fees apply : PAYMENT PERIOD (time payment & time period)
46. Western treaty gp. : OAS
47. What some eyeglasses lack : RIMS
48. On occasion … and how 20-, 25- and 43-Across go? : FROM TIME TO TIME
55. Airline known for tight security : EL AL
56. Saint Laurent of fashion : YVES
57. Kidney-related : RENAL
58. Sonic Dash game publisher : SEGA
59. “__ we forget” : LEST
60. Ernie Banks’ nickname : MR CUB
61. Tens and twenties : CASH
62. Biblical twin : ESAU
63. Etsy transaction, e.g. : E-SALE

Down

1. Body cam-wearing law enforcers : COPS
2. Berry promoted as a superfood : ACAI
3. Explosion sound : BANG
4. Scalds briefly in water, as tomatoes : BLANCHES
5. Steinway competitors : YAMAHAS
6. Got out of jail : SPRUNG
7. Catch wind of : HEAR
8. Slight advantage : EDGE
9. Midday snoozes : SIESTAS
10. A mint may freshen it : BREATH
11. Front of the hand : PALM
12. Like a GI doing dishes : ON KP
13. Barely manage, with “out” : EKE
21. Sunroof coloring : TINT
22. Dash gauge : TACH
25. Like winding roads : CURVY
26. Turn out to be : END UP
27. Steamed up : MAD
28. “Too rich for my blood” : I FOLD!
29. “Little” Dickens girl : NELL
30. Drain phenomenon : EDDY
31. Pipe tobacco packer : TAMP
32. Grammy winner Coolidge : RITA
36. Public defender, for one: Abbr. : ATT
37. Ardent fans : BOOSTERS
39. Line on Levi’s : SEAM
40. Fashionable : IN STYLE
41. Habeas corpus, e.g. : WRIT
42. Boyfriend’s ultimatum : HIM OR ME!
44. Dough in a wallet : MOOLAH
45. 1974 hit with a Spanish title meaning “You are” : ERES TU
48. Cause of a dog’s excessive scratching : FLEA
49. Tattered cloths : RAGS
50. Currier’s colleague : IVES
51. Walled land formation : MESA
52. Machu Picchu dweller : INCA
53. Treat roughly : MAUL
54. Hamburg’s river : ELBE
55. PC “Oops!” key : ESC

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