LA Times Crossword Answers 5 Aug 2018, Sunday

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Constructed by: Bruce Haight
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Anabrands

Themed answers are fictional companies formed by anagramming real-world brand names:

  • 24A. Company covering the ninth of Salinger’s “Nine Stories”? : LAST TALE INSURANCE (from “Allstate Insurance”)
  • 32A. Company providing stimulation before a round? : GOLFERS’ COFFEE (from “Folgers Coffee”)
  • 51A. Company for ones who love taking sides? : I ADORE POTATOES (from “Ore-Ida Potatoes”)
  • 66A. Company that bugs people? : NOSY ELECTRONICS (from “Sony Electronics”)
  • 82A. Company that moves a lot of cash? : LARGE FLOWS BANK (from “Wells-Fargo Bank”)
  • 101A. Company named for its product container? : IN A CARTON MILK (from “Carnation Milk”)
  • 110A. Company dealing “frankly” with campaign issues? : MAYOR’S RACE WIENERS (from “Oscar Mayer Wieners”)

Bill’s time: 31m 11s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Muppet chimp __ Minella : SAL

Sal Minella is a Muppet character. He is the bodyguard for fellow muppet Johnny Fiama who is modeled after Frank Sinatra.

4. “Patience you must have” speaker : YODA

Yoda is one of the most beloved characters of the “Star Wars” series of films. Yoda’s voice is provided by the great modern-day puppeteer Frank Oz of “Muppets” fame.

14. Unit of weight : CARAT

The carat is a unit of mass equal to 200 mg. It is used in sizing gemstones.

19. Biblical priest : ELI

In the Bible, Eli is a High Priest of Shiloh, and the teacher of Samuel. As such, his story is told in the Book of Samuel. Eli had two sons, Hophni and Phinehas, both of whom are described as wicked. As a result of their wayward lifestyle, it is prophesied that all of Eli’s male descendents will die before reaching old age.

21. First name in the 2016 campaign : BERNIE

Bernie Sanders has served as US Senator from Vermont since 2007. Sanders describes himself as a democratic socialist, and used to appear on the ballot as an independent. Prior to joining the Democratic Party in 2015, Sanders had been the longest-serving independent in the history of the US Congress.

24. Company covering the ninth of Salinger’s “Nine Stories”? : LAST TALE INSURANCE (from “Allstate Insurance”)

“Nine Stories” is a collection of short stories by J. D. Salinger that was first published in 1953.

Allstate is the second-largest provider of personal insurance in the US, after State Farm. Allstate started doing business in 1931 as part of Sears Roebuck, and indeed I can remember when Allstate offices were located in Sears stores. Sears spun off Allstate in 1993.

29. White wine apéritif : KIR

Kir is a French cocktail made by adding a teaspoon or so of crème de cassis (blackcurrant liqueur) to a glass, and then topping it off with white wine. The drink is named after Felix Kir, the Mayor of Dijon in Burgundy, who used to offer the drink to his guests. My wife is particularly fond of a variant called a Kir Royale, in which the white wine is replaced with champagne.

An apéritif is an alcoholic drink served before a meal, to stimulate the palate. A digestif is an alcoholic drink served after a meal, to aid digestion.

30. TRS-80s, e.g. : PCS

The TRS-80 was a model of computer sold by the Tandy Corporation through the company’s Radio Shack outlets. Back in 1977, the “big three” of personal computers were Apple, Commodore and Tandy. Well, at least Apple is still around …

32. Company providing stimulation before a round? : GOLFERS’ COFFEE (from “Folgers Coffee”)

Folgers is a brand of coffee made by Smuckers. The brand name comes from the Folgers Coffee Company that was founded in 1835 by J. A. Folger in Nantucket, Massachusetts.

36. Belief system : CREDO

A creed or credo is a confession of faith, or a system of belief or principles. “Credo” is Latin for “I believe”.

37. Robot arms don’t have them : ULNAE

The radius and ulna are bones in the forearm. If you hold the palm of your hand up in front of you, the radius is the bone on the “thumb-side” of the arm, and the ulna is the bone on the “pinkie-side”.

38. Camera lens feature : IRIS

The iris diaphragm of a lens is analogous to the iris of the eye, in that it is the opening through which light passes. The size of that aperture changes the amount of light passing through the lens. The size of the aperture is routinely referred to as the f-stop, and can be varied on many cameras.

43. Madame Bovary : EMMA

“Madame Bovary” is the most famous novel written by Gustave Flaubert. The title character is a doctor’s wife named Emma Bovary, who lives a luxurious life beyond her means and has many adulterous affairs. The novel had a rousing reception, first being attacked by public prosecutors as obscenity, which I am sure later helped it to become a bestseller.

47. Acronymic distress about being excluded from the fun : FOMO

Fear of missing out (FOMO)

49. Opening feature : POP-TOP

The term “pop top” refers to a whole family of designs for opening the top of a soda can. The oldest method is the “pull tab” or “ring pull”, invented in Canada in 1956. The design was long-lived, but it had its problems, so the world heaved a sigh of relief with the invention of the stay-on-tab in 1975. The new design led to less injuries and eliminated all those used pull tabs that littered the streets.

51. Company for ones who love taking sides? : I ADORE POTATOES (from “Ore-Ida Potatoes”)

Ore-Ida’s founders came up with the idea for Tater Tots when they were deciding what to do with residual cuts of potato. They chopped up the leftovers, added flour and seasoning, and extruded the mix through a large hole making a sausage that they cut into small cylinders. We eat 70 million pounds of this extruded potato every year!

59. Brain areas : CEREBRA

The cerebra are the two hemispheres of the brain.

61. Green, in a way : ENVIOUS

William Shakespeare was one of the first to associate the color green with envy. He called jealousy the “green-eyed monster” in his play “Othello”.

65. Rilke works : POEMS

“The Book of Hours” is a poetry collection published in 1905 by the Bohemian-Austrian poet and novelist Rainer Maria Rilke. The collection comprises religious works, relating in particular to Saint Francis and the search for God. The title comes from a Christian devotional book that was popular in the Middle Ages, referred to as the book of hours.

66. Company that bugs people? : NOSY ELECTRONICS (from “Sony Electronics”)

Sony was founded by Akio Morita and Masaru Ibuka as Tokyo Tsushin Kogyo (Tokyo Telecommunications Engineering Corporation). The two partners met in the Japanese Navy during WWII.

69. “Real Time” host : MAHER

Bill Maher is a stand-up comedian and political commentator. Maher has an HBO television show called “Real Time with Bill Maher” which is essentially a follow-on from the very successful “Politically Incorrect” program that started out on Comedy Central.

72. Canadian site of the 1988 Winter Olympics : ALBERTA

Alberta (Alta.) is a big province, one about the size of Texas. Alberta is named after Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, the fourth child of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. Princess Louise also donated her name to Lake Louise, the large glacial lake in the province, now within the bounds of Banff National Park.

Calgary, the largest city in the Canadian province of Alberta, is named for Calgary on the Isle of Mull in Scotland. The Canadian Calgary hosted the 1988 Winter Olympic Games.

73. Tiny and shapeless : AMOEBIC

An ameba (or “amoeba”, as we spell it back in Ireland) is a single-celled microorganism. The name comes from the Greek “amoibe”, meaning change. The name is quite apt, as the cell changes shape readily as the ameba moves, eats and reproduces.

79. ’60s chic : MOD

“Mod” is short for “modernist”, and describes a subculture that originated in London in the late fifties. Young men who called themselves mods tended to wear tailored suits, listen to pop music and drive around on Italian motor scooters. Mods came into conflict with another subculture that emerged at the same time in the UK called the rockers. Rockers were into rock and roll music, and drove motorcycles I remember as a young kid in school having to declare myself as either a mod or a rocker. I don’t think our “gangs” back then were quite the same as they are today though …

80. __ page : OP-ED

“Op-ed” is an abbreviation for “opposite the editorial page”. Op-eds started in “The New York Evening World” in 1921 when the page opposite the editorials was used for articles written by a named guest writer, someone independent of the editorial board.

81. Acapulco gold : ORO

The Mexican city of Acapulco is on the southwest coast of the country, in the state of Guerrero. The name “Acapulco” translates from the local language into “at the big reeds”.

82. Company that moves a lot of cash? : LARGE FLOWS BANK (from “Wells-Fargo Bank”)

Back in the mid-1800s, Henry Wells founded an express package delivery service called Wells and Company. Around the same time, William Fargo founded Fargo and Company as a competitor. The two decided to join forces instead of competing, and took on a partner and formed the American Express Company (which is still around today). Fargo and Wells then decided to set up a company in California to provide express delivery and banking services, a company they called Wells Fargo.

89. Card sounding like a platter : TREY

A trey is a three in a deck of cards. The term “trey” can also be used for a domino with three pips, and even a three-point play in basketball.

“Trey” sounds like “tray”.

90. Christmas lot selection : FIRS

Firs are evergreen coniferous trees, with several species being popular as Christmas trees. The most commonly used species during the holidays are the Nordmann fir, noble fir, Fraser fir and balsam fir. We also see a lot of Douglas fir trees at Christmas, but they’re not actually true firs.

91. “Little House” family name : OLESON

On the iconic television show “Little House on the Prairie”, the proprietor of Oleson’s Mercantile is Nels Oleson, who was played by actor Richard Bull.

94. Shirley MacLaine, to Warren Beatty : SIS

Actress Shirley MacLaine was born Shirley MacLean Beaty in Richmond, Virginia in 1934. Perhaps in an unknown nod to her future, she was named for child actress Shirley Temple. MacLaine’s younger brother is actor Warren Beatty, who also changed the spelling of his name for his acting career.

The actor Warren Beatty spends a lot of time in other roles in the film industry. He is the only person to have been nominated twice for an Academy Award for acting in, directing, writing and producing the same film. He was so honored for 1978’s “Heaven Can Wait” and for 1981’s “Reds”. Beatty is the younger brother of actress Shirley MacLaine, and has been married to fellow actor Annette Bening since 1992.

96. Big heap : SLEW

Our usage of “slew” to mean “large number” has nothing to do with the verb “to slew” meaning “to turn, skid”. The noun “slew” come into English in the early 1800s from the Irish word “sluagh” meaning “host, crowd, multitude”.

97. Cartoon genre : ANIME

Anime is cartoon animation in the style of Japanese Manga comic books.

99. Trace of color : TINCT

To tinct is to add a little color to something. The term ultimately derives from the Latin verb “tingere” meaning “to dye”.

101. Company named for its product container? : IN A CARTON MILK (from “Carnation Milk”)

105. Old marketplaces : AGORAE

In early Greece, the agora was a place of assembly. The assemblies held there were often quite formal, perhaps for the reading of a proclamation. Later in Greek history, things became less formal as the agora evolved into a marketplace. Our contemporary word “agoraphobia” comes from these agorae, in the sense that an agoraphobe has a fear of open spaces, a fear of “public meeting places”.

108. Moll’s limb : GAM

The American slang term “gams” is used for a woman’s legs. The term goes back to the 18th century “gamb” describing the leg of an animal on a coat of arms.

109. Grammy winner Gorme : EYDIE

Eydie Gormé is best known for her work with her husband Steve Lawrence. The duo started performing traditional popular music together in the late fifties. One of the couple’s children is David Nessim Lawrence, a composer who wrote the score for the 2006 movie “High School Musical”.

110. Company dealing “frankly” with campaign issues? : MAYOR’S RACE WIENERS (from “Oscar Mayer Wieners”)

The Oscar Mayer brand of meats was named for a German immigrant named Oscar F. Mayer who sold German sausages in the Chicago area in the late 1800s. The Oscar Mayer company has a famous vehicle called the Wienermobile that it has used in promotions for over 70 years.

116. Overhead concern? : OZONE

Ozone gets its name from the Greek word “ozein” meaning “to smell”. It was given this name as ozone’s formation during lightning storms was detected by the gas’s distinctive smell. Famously, there is a relatively high concentration of the gas in the “ozone layer” in the Earth’s stratosphere. This ozone layer provides a vital function for animal life on the planet as it absorbs most of the sun’s UV radiation. A molecule of ozone is made up of three oxygen atoms, whereas a “normal” oxygen has just two atoms

120. Author Theodor __ Geisel : SEUSS

“Dr. Seuss” was the pen name of Theodor Seuss Geisel. Geisel first used the pen name while studying at Dartmouth College and at the University of Oxford. Back then, he pronounced “Seuss” as it would be in German, i.e. rhyming with “voice”. After his books found success in the US, he went with the pronunciation being used widely by the public, quite happy to have a name that rhymes with “Mother Goose”.

122. Nobelist Wiesel : ELIE

Elie Wiesel was a holocaust survivor, and is best known for his book “Night” that tells of his experiences in Auschwitz and Buchenwald. Wiesel was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986.

Down

1. Former MLB exec Bud : SELIG

Bud Selig was the Commissioner of Baseball for Major League Baseball from 1998 to 2015. Selig became acting commissioner in 1992 after the resignation of Fay Vincent. The team owners searched for a new commissioner for six years, and finally gave the permanent job to Selig in 1998.

2. Dollar rival : ALAMO

The third largest car rental company over recent years is Alamo, which was founded in 1974. Alamo made inroads (pun!) into the market by popularizing the idea of “unlimited mileage”.

4. First female Fed head Janet : YELLEN

The economist Janet Yellen was appointed Chair of the Federal Reserve in 2014 by President Obama. When her appointment was confirmed by the US Senate, Yellen became the first woman to hold the position.

7. Shenanigan : ANTIC

I suppose one might be forgiven for thinking that “shenanigan” is an Irish term, as it certainly sounds Irish. Usually written in the plural, shenanigans are acts of mischief, pranks. Apparently the word is of uncertain derivation, but was coined in San Francisco and Sacramento, California in the mid-1800s.

8. Legal gp. : ABA

American Bar Association (ABA)

9. Penn. neighbor : DEL

The state of Delaware takes its name from Virginia’s first colonial governor, Englishman Thomas West, 3rd Baron De La Warr. Delaware is known as the First State as it was the first to ratify the US Constitution, in 1787.

10. Brunch fare : CREPES

“Crêpe” is the French word for “pancake”.

12. Money-dispensing needs : PINS

One enters a Personal Identification Number (PIN) when using an Automated Teller Machine (ATM). Given that the N in PIN stands for “number”, then “PIN number” is a redundant phrase. And, given that the M in ATM stands for “machine”, then “ATM machine” is a redundant phrase as well. Grr …!

15. Tony, for one : AWARD

Sardi’s is a famous restaurant in the Theater District of Manhattan that was opened in 1927 by Italian immigrant Vincent Sardi, Sr. Sardi’s is famous for attracting celebrities who sometimes pose for caricatures that are then displayed on the restaurant’s walls. After the death of actress and director Antoinette Perry in 1946, her friend and partner Brock Pemberton was having lunch at Sardi’s and came up with idea of a theater award that could be presented in Perry’s honor. The award was to be called the Tony Award. In fact, Vincent Sardi, Sr. was presented with a special Tony at the first award ceremony, held in 1947.

17. Oil acronym : ARCO

The company name “ARCO” stands for the Atlantic Richfield Company. One of ARCO’s claims to fame is that it is responsible for the nation’s largest Superfund site. Mining and smelting in the area around Butte, Montana polluted the region’s water and soil, and ARCO have agreed to pay $187 million to help clean up the area.

25. Three-horse carriage : TROIKA

“Troika” is a Russian word meaning “set of three”. “Troika” can apply to a sled or carriage drawn by three horses, or to a folk dance between one man and two women. The term might also apply to a triumvirate of political leaders.

28. Key of Beethoven’s “Eroica” : E-FLAT

Beethoven originally dedicated his “Symphony No. 3” to Napoleon Bonaparte. Beethoven admired the principles of the French Revolution and as such respected Bonaparte who was “born” out of the uprising. When Napoleon declared himself Emperor, Beethoven (and much of Europe) saw this as a betrayal to the ideals of the revolution so he changed the name of his new symphony from “Bonaparte” to “Eroica”, meaning “heroic, valiant”.

34. One of the Weasley twins : FRED

Fred and George Weasley are two characters in the “Harry Potter” universe. They are older twin brothers of Ron Weasley, Harry’s loyal friend. The twins were born on April Fools’ Day, and love working together to prank people.

35. Dog tag? : FIDO

“Fido”, the name for many a dog, is Latin for “I trust”.

36. Italy’s Lake __ : COMO

Lake Como is a glacial lake in Lombardy in Italy. Lake Como has long been a retreat for the rich and famous. Lakeside homes there are owned by the likes of Madonna, George Clooney, Gianni Versace, Sylvester Stallone and Richard Branson.

39. Wham! or Roxette : POP DUO

I found out relatively recently that the eighties pop duo that we knew on the other side of the Atlantic as “Wham!” were better known as “Wham! UK” in North America. Apparently there already was a band called Wham! here in the US. Wham! UK was composed of singers George Michael and Andrew Ridgeley. George Michael made it big as a solo artist after the pair broke up and Ridgeley kind of faded into obscurity, relatively speaking.

Swedish pop rock performers Marie Fredriksson and Per Gessle came together in 1986 to form the duo Roxette.

42. Blog series : POSTS

Many folks who visit this website regard it as just that, a website. That is true, but more correctly it is referred to as a blog, as I make regular posts (actually daily posts) that then occupy the “front page” of the site. The blog entries are in reverse chronological order, and one can just look back day-by-day, reading older and older posts. “Blog” is a contraction of the term “web log”.

47. Film noir hat : FEDORA

A fedora is a lovely hat, I think. It is made of felt, and is similar to a trilby, but has a broader brim. “Fedora” was a play written for Sarah Bernhardt and first performed in 1889. Bernhardt had the title role of Princess Fedora, and on stage she wore a hat similar to a modern-day fedora. The play led to the women’s fashion accessory, the fedora hat, commonly worn by women into the beginning of the twentieth century. Men then started wearing fedoras, but only when women gave up the fashion …

48. Serving no purpose : OTIOSE

“Otiose” means “lazy, indolent”, and comes from the Latin word “otium” meaning “leisure”. Use of the term has extended to mean “without profit, futile”.

50. “Look Back in Anger” playwright John : OSBORNE

“Look Back in Anger” is a play by John Osborne that was first performed in 1956, and adapted for the big screen in 1959. The British film version stars the Richard Burton and Claire Bloom, who give very gritty performances.

52. “Nick of Time” singer : RAITT

Bonnie Raitt is a blues singer originally from Burbank, California. Raitt has won nine Grammys for her work, but she is perhaps as well known for her political activism as she is for her music. She was no fan of President George W. Bush while he was in office, and she sure did show it.

56. “Glee” actress Rivera : NAYA

Naya Rivera is an actress and singer whose big break came with the role of high school cheerleader Santana Lopez on the TV show “Glee”. Offscreen, Rivera was engaged for a while to rap artist Big Sean, and was married for four years to actor Ryan Dorsey.

63. DVD forerunner : VCR

Video Cassette Recorder (VCR)

67. “Get Shorty” novelist __ Leonard : ELMORE

Elmore Leonard used to write a lot of westerns in the fifties and moved onto crime and suspense novels later in his career. A lot of his books have made it to the big screen, including “Get Shorty” and “Mr Majestyk”.

“Get Shorty” is a 1995 crime-comedy with a great cast that includes John Travolta, Gene Hackman, Rene Russo and Danny DeVito. That said, the storyline is a little too zany for me so I didn’t really enjoy it …

68. Unequivocal refusal : I MEAN NO!

The verb “to equivocate” comes from the Latin “aequus” meaning “equal” and “vocare” meaning “to call”. So, to equivocate is “to call equally”, and is used in the sense of giving equal emphasis to two sides of an argument, to be non-committal, to hedge, to equivocate. So, something described as “unequivocal” is the opposite, is unambiguous and clear.

70. ’70s breakout gaming company : ATARI

At one point, the electronics and video game manufacturer Atari was the fastest growing company in US history. However, Atari never really recovered from the video game industry crash of 1983.

Breakout is an Atari arcade game that was released in 1976. Breakout is really like a more complex version of Pong, and involves destroying a layer of bricks in the top third of the screen using a “ball” that is “batted” against the brick wall. I wasted a few hours playing Breakout back in the day …

71. Toast for Mrs. Robinson : HERE’S TO YOU …

When Mike Nichols was making the 1967 film “The Graduate” he apparently became obsessed with the music of Simon and Garfunkel, who were just coming into the limelight. Nichols made a deal with Paul Simon to write three songs that he could use on the soundtrack of his new movie. Simon and Garfunkel were touring constantly around that time, so Nichols had to badger Simon to hold up his end of the bargain. When Nichols was ready to lay down the film’s soundtrack there was only one commissioned song available, so Nichols had to basically beg Paul Simon for anything. Simon mentioned that he was finishing up one new song, but it wasn’t written for the film. It was more a celebration of former times, with lyrics about baseball great Joe DiMaggio and former First Lady, Mrs. Roosevelt. Nichols informed Simon that the song was no longer about Mrs. Roosevelt, and it was about Mrs. Robinson …

74. Capital south of a panhandle : BOISE, IDAHO

Boise, Idaho is the largest metropolitan area in the state by far. There are a number of stories pertaining to the etymology of the name “Boise”. One is that French trappers called the tree-lined river that ran through the area “la rivière boisée”, meaning “the wooded river”.

The US state of Idaho has a panhandle that extends northwards between Washington and Montana, right up to the border with Canada. Across that border is the Canadian province of British Columbia. Most of Idaho is in the Mountain Time Zone, but Northern Idaho (the Panhandle) is in the Pacific Time Zone.

75. “Dies __” : IRAE

“Dies Irae” is Latin for “Day of Wrath”. It is the name of a famous melody in Gregorian Chant, one that is often used as part of the Roman Catholic Requiem Mass.

76. How vichyssoise is usually served : COLD

Vichyssoise is a thick puréed potato soup that can be served hot, but is usually served cold. As well as potatoes, a classic vichyssoise contains leeks, onions, cream and chicken stock. Although the origin is disputed, it seems that the vichyssoise was invented in America, albeit by a French chef. That chef named his soup after the town of Vichy in France.

78. Wipes out : EFFACES

To efface is to erase or obliterate, with the term “efface” coming from the Middle French “effacer” meaning “to wipe out”, or more literally “to remove the face”.

84. Whirled weapon : BOLA

Bolas are heavy balls connected by cords that constitute a throwing weapon. Bolas are often used to capture animals by tripping them as they run. The weapon is usually associated with gauchos, the South American cowboys, although there is evidence that the Inca army used them in battle.

85. First portrayer of Obi-Wan : ALEC

Sir Alec Guinness played many great roles over a long and distinguished career, but nowadays is best remembered (sadly, I think) for playing the original Obi-Wan Kenobi in “Star Wars”.

Obi-Wan Kenobi is one of the more beloved of the “Star Wars” characters. Kenobi was portrayed by two fabulous actors in the series of films. As a young man he is played by Scottish actor Ewan McGregor, and as an older man he is played by Alec Guinness.

86. Meditative genre : NEW AGE

New-Age music is created to provide a relaxing and stress-free atmosphere. The New Age movement is often said to have begun with the release of an album called “Spectrum Suite” by Steven Halpern in 1975.

88. Gin __ : RUMMY

Gin rummy is a variant of the slower game known as standard rummy. It was introduced in 1909 by one Elwood Baker and his son.

98. Actually existing : IN ESSE

The Latin term “in esse” is used to mean “actually existing”, and translates as “in being”.

101. Andean people : INCAS

Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro discovered the Incas in 1526, marking the beginning of the end for an ancient civilization that was to be ravaged by brutal Spanish colonists and by imported smallpox. The last leader of the Inca was Atahualpa. Pizarro staged a mock trial and then condemned Atahualpa to execution by burning. A Spanish friar intervened on behalf of the condemned man, as Atahualpa believed that if he was burned his soul would not move on to the afterlife. Pizarro, was kind enough to have Atahualpa garroted instead.

105. Cookie monster? : AMOS

Wally Amos was a talent agent, one who was in the habit of taking home-baked cookies with him as an enticement to get celebrities to see him. He was urged by friends to open a cookie store (the cookies were that delicious, I guess) and this he did in Los Angeles in 1975 using the name “Famous Amos”. The store was a smash hit and he was able build on the success by introducing his cookies into supermarkets. The brand was eventually purchased, making Wally a rich man, and Famous Amos cookies are still flying off the shelf. Wally Amos also became an energetic literacy advocate. He hosted 30 TV programs in 1987 entitled “Learn to Read” that provided reading instruction targeted at adults.

107. Tools in locks : OARS

Oarlocks are swivelling braces on the sides of a rowing boat that hold the oars as the boat is being propelled. Back in Ireland, we call them “rowlocks” (pronounced “rollox”).

112. Caught in the rain without an umbrella, say : WET

Our term “umbrella” ultimately derives from the Latin “umbra” meaning “shade, shadow”.

113. Bouncer’s requests : IDS

Identity document (ID)

114. Ballpark fig. : RBI

Run batted in (RBI)

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Muppet chimp __ Minella : SAL
4. “Patience you must have” speaker : YODA
8. Text for a promo : AD COPY
14. Unit of weight : CARAT
19. Biblical priest : ELI
20. Steady : EVEN
21. First name in the 2016 campaign : BERNIE
22. Informed : AWARE
23. Track circuit : LAP
24. Company covering the ninth of Salinger’s “Nine Stories”? : LAST TALE INSURANCE (from “Allstate Insurance”)
27. Spur on : IMPEL
29. White wine apéritif : KIR
30. TRS-80s, e.g. : PCS
31. __ of interest : PERSON
32. Company providing stimulation before a round? : GOLFERS’ COFFEE (from “Folgers Coffee”)
36. Belief system : CREDO
37. Robot arms don’t have them : ULNAE
38. Camera lens feature : IRIS
39. Like a D, gradewise : POOR
40. Subway posting : MAP
43. Madame Bovary : EMMA
45. Bankrolled : STAKED
47. Acronymic distress about being excluded from the fun : FOMO
48. Leery of : ONTO
49. Opening feature : POP-TOP
51. Company for ones who love taking sides? : I ADORE POTATOES (from “Ore-Ida Potatoes”)
54. “__ got it!” : I’VE
55. Fax button : SEND
57. Toss in : ADD
58. Look down on, figuratively : SPIT AT
59. Brain areas : CEREBRA
61. Green, in a way : ENVIOUS
65. Rilke works : POEMS
66. Company that bugs people? : NOSY ELECTRONICS (from “Sony Electronics”)
69. “Real Time” host : MAHER
72. Canadian site of the 1988 Winter Olympics : ALBERTA
73. Tiny and shapeless : AMOEBIC
77. Timeless, in verse : ETERNE
79. ’60s chic : MOD
80. __ page : OP-ED
81. Acapulco gold : ORO
82. Company that moves a lot of cash? : LARGE FLOWS BANK (from “Wells-Fargo Bank”)
87. Like some surveys : AERIAL
89. Card sounding like a platter : TREY
90. Christmas lot selection : FIRS
91. “Little House” family name : OLESON
93. Spent : USED
94. Shirley MacLaine, to Warren Beatty : SIS
95. Ump’s cry : SAFE!
96. Big heap : SLEW
97. Cartoon genre : ANIME
99. Trace of color : TINCT
101. Company named for its product container? : IN A CARTON MILK (from “Carnation Milk”)
105. Old marketplaces : AGORAE
107. United : ONE
108. Moll’s limb : GAM
109. Grammy winner Gorme : EYDIE
110. Company dealing “frankly” with campaign issues? : MAYOR’S RACE WIENERS (from “Oscar Mayer Wieners”)
115. Even a little : ANY
116. Overhead concern? : OZONE
117. Emotionally out of control : CRAZED
118. Runs on : GABS
119. Laugh starter : HEE-
120. Author Theodor __ Geisel : SEUSS
121. Helpful holdings : ASSETS
122. Nobelist Wiesel : ELIE
123. Not even : ODD

Down

1. Former MLB exec Bud : SELIG
2. Dollar rival : ALAMO
3. Beauty product for kissers : LIP PLUMPER
4. First female Fed head Janet : YELLEN
5. Eggs in a lab : OVA
6. An in-box might be part of one : DESK SET
7. Shenanigan : ANTIC
8. Legal gp. : ABA
9. Penn. neighbor : DEL
10. Brunch fare : CREPES
11. In the cooler : ON ICE
12. Money-dispensing needs : PINS
13. “Suh-weet!” : YES!
14. More than a job : CAREER
15. Tony, for one : AWARD
16. Pasted message, stereotypically : RANSOM NOTE
17. Oil acronym : ARCO
18. Many a gamer : TEEN
25. Three-horse carriage : TROIKA
26. Dislodges : UPROOTS
28. Key of Beethoven’s “Eroica” : E-FLAT
33. Silky-voiced crooners they are not : RASPERS
34. One of the Weasley twins : FRED
35. Dog tag? : FIDO
36. Italy’s Lake __ : COMO
39. Wham! or Roxette : POP DUO
41. Elite crew : A-TEAM
42. Blog series : POSTS
43. Awesome : EPIC
44. Formally propose : MOVE
46. Support : AID
47. Film noir hat : FEDORA
48. Serving no purpose : OTIOSE
50. “Look Back in Anger” playwright John : OSBORNE
52. “Nick of Time” singer : RAITT
53. Software details : APP CODE
56. “Glee” actress Rivera : NAYA
60. Get-up-and-go : ENERGY
61. They’re rubbed when mingling : ELBOWS
62. Calls for : NEEDS
63. DVD forerunner : VCR
64. Piece of cake : SNAP
67. “Get Shorty” novelist __ Leonard : ELMORE
68. Unequivocal refusal : I MEAN NO!
69. Softens : MELTS
70. ’70s breakout gaming company : ATARI
71. Toast for Mrs. Robinson : HERE’S TO YOU …
74. Capital south of a panhandle : BOISE, IDAHO
75. “Dies __” : IRAE
76. How vichyssoise is usually served : COLD
78. Wipes out : EFFACES
80. Stamps of approval : OKS
83. Pilfer : LIFT
84. Whirled weapon : BOLA
85. First portrayer of Obi-Wan : ALEC
86. Meditative genre : NEW AGE
88. Gin __ : RUMMY
92. Kind of cookie : OATMEAL
95. Catches : SNARES
96. Cold outburst : SNEEZE
98. Actually existing : IN ESSE
100. Most clubs in a pro’s bag : IRONS
101. Andean people : INCAS
102. Scope : RANGE
103. Like much loose-leaf paper : LINED
104. Focused (on) : KEYED
105. Cookie monster? : AMOS
106. Look steadily : GAZE
107. Tools in locks : OARS
111. Early TV maker : RCA
112. Caught in the rain without an umbrella, say : WET
113. Bouncer’s requests : IDS
114. Ballpark fig. : RBI

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