LA Times Crossword Answers 16 Aug 2018, Thursday

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Constructed by: Bruce Haight
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Boxed Wines

There are four occurrences of the letters WINE arranged in squares, i.e. arranged in BOXES, in each of the four corners of the grid:

  • 37A. With 40-Across, party supplies found in this puzzle’s four corners : BOXED …
  • 40A. See 37-Across : … WINES

Bill’s time: 8m 00s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

10. “Sing it, Sam” speaker : ILSA

There is a famous exchange in the movie “Casablanca” that results in the piano player Sam singing “As Time Goes By”.

Ilsa: Play it once, Sam. For old times’ sake.
Sam: I don’t know what you mean, Miss Ilsa.
Ilsa: Play it, Sam. Play “As Time Goes By.”
Sam: Oh, I can’t remember it, Miss Ilsa. I’m a little rusty on it.
Ilsa: I’ll hum it for you. Da-dy-da-dy-da-dum, da-dy-da-dee-da-dum…
Ilsa: Sing it, Sam.

14. Gospel singer Andrews : INEZ

Inez Andrews was a gospel singer with wide-ranging contralto voice. Andrews sang with the group of gospel singers known as the Caravans in fifties and sixties. She left the Caravans in 1962 to form her own group, Inez Andrews and the Andrewettes. She also started solo touring in 1967.

15. Annual Big Apple parade sponsor : MACY’S

The annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City has been held every year since 1924, with a brief suspension from 1942-1944. The parade was halted during WWII as there was a need for rubber and helium to support the war effort.

17. New Zealand bird : KIWI

The kiwi is an unusual bird in that it has a highly developed sense of smell and is the only one of our feathered friends with nostrils located at the tip of its long beak.

18. __ Wars: Rome vs. Carthage : PUNIC

The Punic Wars were a series of three conflicts fought between Ancient Rome and Ancient Carthage. With Carthage on the North African coast and Rome on the east coast of Italy, the Punic wars were largely an attempt to control the western Mediterranean Sea and were centered on the island of Sicily.

19. Tizzy : SNIT

The exact etymology of “snit”, meaning “fit of temper”, isn’t really known. The term was first used in print in the play “Kiss the Boys Goodbye” by Clare Booth Luce, which dates back to the 1930s and is set in the American South.

20. Vogue VIPs : EDS

“Vogue” magazine has been published for an awfully long time, with the first issue appearing in 1892. Over the decades the magazine has picked up a lot of criticism as well as its many fans. Famously, an assistant to the editor wrote a novel based on her experiences working with the magazine’s editor, and called it “The Devil Wears Prada”.

21. __ wrench : ALLEN

The Allen wrench (or “Allen key”, as we call it back in Ireland) is a successful brand of hex wrench that was trademarked in 1943 by the Allen Manufacturing Company of Hartford , Connecticut. However, the hex wrench had in fact been around since the mid-to-late 1800s.

22. With 22-Down, “People’s Court” rival : JUDGE …
(22D. See 22-Across : … JUDY)

Judge Judy of television fame is Judith Sheindlin, a retired family court judge from New York. Ms. Sheindlin reportedly earns $47 million per year for “Judge Judy”. That’s a tad more than she was earning on the “real” bench, I think, and it makes her the highest-earning personality on television by a long shot.

23. KOA campground area : RV LOT

Recreational vehicle (RV)

Kampgrounds of America (KOA) was founded in 1962 by Montana businessman Dave Drum, who opened up his first property along the Yellowstone River. His strategy was to offer a rich package of services including hot showers, restrooms and a store, which he hoped would attract people used to camping in the rough. The original campground was an immediate hit and Drum took on two partners and sold franchises all over the country. There are about 500 KOA sites today.

27. Ally of “WarGames” : SHEEDY

Ally Sheedy is best known as a member of the “Brat Pack”, so she appeared in “The Breakfast Club” and “St. Elmo’s Fire”. She was in another of my favorite films, “WarGames”. To be honest, I haven’t enjoyed the movies in which Sheedy has appeared since those early days.

“WarGames” is a really fun 1983 movie starring Matthew Broderick and Ally Sheedy. There was a sequel that was released in 2008 called “WarGames: The Dead Code”. I haven’t seen it, and I fear I might be disappointed …

29. “Westworld,” e.g. : HBO DRAMA

“Westworld” is an HBO series that is based on a 1973 movie of the same name, which was written and directed by novelist Michael Crichton. Westworld is a high-tech theme park populated by androids that interact with the guests.

33. “It’s a Wonderful Life” director : CAPRA

I can’t tell you how many of Frank Capra’s movies are on my list of all-time favorites. He directed such classics as “It Happened One Night”, “Mr. Deeds Goes to Town”, “Lost Horizon”, “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington”, “Meet John Doe”, “Arsenic and Old Lace” and the holiday favorite “It’s a Wonderful Life”. Capra was the first person to win three directorial Oscars: for “It Happened One Night”, “Mr. Deeds Goes to Town” and “You Can’t Take It With You”. Capra also did his bit during WWII, enlisting just a few days after Pearl Harbor was attacked. Given his great talent, and the fact that he enlisted at the relatively advanced age of 44, the US Army put him to work directing 11 documentary war films in the “Why We Fight” series, for which he was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal.

The Christmas classic “It’s a Wonderful Life” was released in 1946, and is a Frank Capra movie starring James Stewart and Donna Reed. The film’s screenplay was adapted from a short story called “The Greatest Gift” by Philip Van Doren Stern. Remember the famous swimming pool scene? That was shot in Beverly High School gym, and the pool is still in use today.

36. Revlon rival : AVON

In 1886, a young man called David McConnell was selling books door-to-door. To enhance his sales numbers he was giving out free perfume to the ladies of the houses that he visited. Seeing as his perfume was more popular than his books, he founded the California Perfume Company in New York City and started manufacturing and selling across the country. The company name was changed to Avon in 1939, and the famous “Avon Calling” marketing campaign was launched in 1954.

Revlon was founded in the depths of the Great Depression in 1932, by Charles and Joseph Revson. The “S” in the “Revson” name was replaced by the “L” from Charles “Lachman”, a chemist who partnered with the two brothers.

37. With 40-Across, party supplies found in this puzzle’s four corners : BOXED …
40. See 37-Across : … WINES

The “box wine” package was invented in Australia, back in 1935. The original design had no tap, so the corner had to be cut off the bladder to get at the wine. The bladder with a tap was also invented in Australia, but not until 1967. I’ve done blind taste tests featuring bottled and boxed wines, and love the box concept, especially for a decent red wine …

38. Beige shade : BONE

Our word “beige” comes from the Old French “bege”, a term that applied to the natural color of wool and cotton that was not dyed.

43. Cantina toast : SALUD!

“Salud” is Spanish for “health”, and is used as a toast. Salud!

44. __ donna : PRIMA

The Italian operatic term “prima donna” is used for the lead female singer in an opera company. “Prima donna” translates from Italian as “first lady”. The lead male singer is known as the “primo uomo”. The term “prima donna assoluta” is reserved for a prima donna who is generally accepted as being an outstanding performer. We tend to use “prima donna” for a female performer who has an inflated ego.

47. __ exercise: upper arm strengthener : TRICEP

The triceps brachii muscle is found at the back of the upper arm. The muscle’s name translates to “three-headed arm muscle”, fitting as it is actually made up of three bundles of muscles.

48. The “G” of GTO : GRAN

The initialism “GTO” was used on several touring cars (including a famous Pontiac) and stands for “Gran Turismo Omologato”. Italian car manufacturers started the tradition of calling their luxury performance cars “Gran Turismo”, and calling those cars they approved for racing “Gran Turismo Omologato”. The phrase “gran turismo omologato” translates as “grand touring homologated”, with “homologated” being a technical term signifying official approval.

49. Apple __ : CRISP

“Apple crisp” is the name used in the US for a dessert comprising baked apples topped with a crisp streusel crust. The latter is a crumbly topping made from flour, butter and sugar. Apple crisp is usually referred to as “apple crumble” in Canada and the UK.

50. Start of a French oath : SACRE …

French speakers don’t really use the profanity “sacré bleu”, at least not anymore, but we see it a lot in English literature featuring native French speakers. Most famously it is uttered by Agatha Christie’s delightful Belgian detective Hercule Poirot. There is some dispute about the origins of “sacré bleu” (sacred blue), but French dictionaries explain that it is a “softening” of the alternative “sacré Dieu” (Holy God).

53. Norwegian contemporary of Tchaikovsky : GRIEG

Edvard Grieg is Norway’s best known composer, some who was active in the Romantic Era. Grieg’s most famous works are the gorgeous “Piano Concerto in A minor”, and his incidental music for the play “Peer Gynt” by Henrik Ibsen.

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky was one of Russia’s most celebrated composers of the romantic period. Tchaikovsky was helped in his career by Russian businesswoman Nadezhda von Meck, who served as his patroness for 13 years. Famously, von Meck provided financial support so that he could devote himself to composition, but on condition that Tchaikovsky was never to meet her. The pair never did meet, but they did exchange over 1,200 letters.

58. One-fifth of a limerick : LINE

No one knows for sure how the limerick got its name, although there does seem to be agreement the name does indeed come from the city or county of Limerick in Ireland. Try this one for size:

There was a young lady named Bright
who traveled much faster than light.
She set out one day
in a relative way,
and came back the previous night.

59. Guadalajara gal pal : AMIGA

Guadalajara is a populous city in the Mexican state of Jalisco. The Mexican city is named after the city of the same name in the center of Spain.

60. Target Field player : TWIN

Target Field is a baseball park in Minneapolis, Minnesota that has been home to the Minnesota Twins since the stadium opening in 2010. Target Corporation, which is headquartered in Minneapolis, paid an undisclosed sum to get the naming rights of the park.

64. Skin pics : TATS

The word “tattoo” (often shortened to “tat”) was first used in English in the writings of the famous English explorer Captain Cook. In his descriptions of the indelible marks adorning the skin of Polynesian natives, Cook anglicized the Tahitian word “tatau” into our “tattoo”. Tattoos are also sometimes referred to as “ink”.

Down

1. Karaoke need : MIKE

“Microphone” is often abbreviated to “mike” or “mic”.

“Karate” is a Japanese word meaning “empty hand”, and the related word “karaoke” translates as “empty orchestra”.

2. Novelist Bagnold : ENID

Enid Bagnold was a British author and is best known for her 1935 novel “National Velvet”, which famously was adapted into a very successful film starring Elizabeth Taylor.

4. “Argo” weapon : UZI

The first Uzi submachine gun was designed in the late 1940s by Major Uziel “Uzi” Gal of the Israel Defense Forces, who gave his name to the gun.

“Argo” is a 2012 movie that is based on the true story of the rescue of six diplomats hiding out during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis. The film was directed by and stars Ben Affleck and is produced by Grant Heslov and George Clooney, the same pair who produced the excellent “Good Night, and Good Luck”. I highly recommend “Argo”, although I found the scenes of religious fervor to be very frightening …

6. Event for which Kerri Strug is famous : VAULT

Kerri Strug is that plucky little gymnast who made an outstanding final vault in the 1996 Atlanta Olympics despite having an injured ankle. I think we all remember her being carried off after her vault in the arms of the US team coach Bela Karolyi.

8. Endangered species : DYING BREED

Like crossword bloggers …

9. PC bailout key : ESC

The escape key (Esc) was originally used to control computer peripherals. It was a key that allowed the computer operator to stop what the peripheral was doing (cancel a print job, for example). Nowadays the escape key is used for all sorts of things, especially in gaming programs.

12. Belt : SWIG

A belt is a swift swig of hard liquor.

21. “Bridge of Spies” actor : ALDA

Alan Alda has had a great television career, especially of course as a lead actor in “M*A*S*H”. Alda won his first Emmy in 1972, for playing surgeon Hawkeye Pierce on “M*A*S*H”. He won his most recent Emmy in 2006 for his portrayal of Presidential candidate Senator Arnold Vinick in “The West Wing”. When it comes to the big screen, my favorite of Alda’s movies is the 1978 romantic comedy “Same Time, Next Year” in which he starred opposite Ellen Burstyn.

“Bridge of Spies” is a 2015 historical thriller directed by Steven Spielberg and starring his friend Tom Hanks. The story is all about the arrest and trial of U-2 pilot Gary Powers, who was shot down over the Soviet Union while on a spying mission for the CIA. Hanks plays lawyer James B. Donovan, the lawyer who negotiates Powers’ release. Powers was actually exchanged for Soviet spy Rudolf Abel, with the exchange taking place at the bridge connecting Potsdam with Berlin, the “Bridge of Spies”.

24. Fogg’s creator : VERNE

Jules Verne really was a groundbreaking author. Verne pioneered the science fiction genre, writing about space, air and underwater travel, long before they were practical and proved feasible. Verne is the second-most translated author of all time, with only Agatha Christie beating him out.

“Around the World in 80 Days” is just a wonderful adventure story written by French author Jules Verne and first published in 1873. There have been some great screen adaptations of the story, including the 1956 movie starring David Niven as the protagonist Phileas Fogg. In almost all adaptations, a balloon is used for part of the journey, and is perhaps the most memorable means of transportation on Fogg’s trip around the world. However, if you read the book, Fogg never used a balloon at all.

27. Egyptian beetle : SCARAB

Scarabs were amulets in ancient Egypt. Scarabs were modelled on the dung beetle, as it was viewed as a symbol of the cycle of life.

28. Morro Castle city : HAVANA

Morro Castle is a fortress guarding the entrance to Havana Bay in Cuba. The castle was built by the Spanish in 1859. The name “Morro” means “rock visible from the sea”.

30. Electricity producer, perhaps : ATOMIC POWER

A common nuclear fuel is uranium dioxide (UO2). The UO2 comes in powder form and is compacted into pellets that are fired at high temperature producing ceramic pellets. The pellets are ground into a near-perfect cylindrical shape and are then stacked inside tubes made of zirconium alloy. These tubes are what we usually refer to as nuclear fuel rods.

31. Dr. Evil’s cohort : MINI-ME

The actor Verne Troyer was best known for playing the character Mini-Me in the “Austin Powers” series of films. Troyer suffered from a form of dwarfism, and at a height of only 2 ft 8 in was one of the shortest men in the world.

37. African title of respect : BWANA

“Bwana” is a Swahili word meaning “important person” or “leader of a safari”.

38. Foe of “moose and squirrel” : BORIS

Fearless Leader, Boris Badenov and Natasha Fatale are all characters in the cartoon show “Rocky and Bullwinkle”. Fearless Leader is the dictatorial ruler of Pottsylvania, and Boris and Natasha are two of his minions, two inept government agents.

46. Means of escape : EGRESS

Barnum’s American Museum opened in New York City in 1841, and sadly burned to the ground in 1865. The attractions in the museum included zoo animals, waxworks as well as theater shows and “freak shows”. Famously, a sign pointing to the exit of the museum read “This Way to the Egress”. Many visitors followed the sign, anxious to see the “egress” exhibit, only to find themselves out on the street!

49. Insurance giant : CIGNA

The health care management company known as Cigna was formed in 1982 by a merger of two insurance companies. One was Connecticut General (CG) and the other Insurance Company of North America (INA).

50. Part of a piggy bank : SLOT

The word “pig” can be used for earthenware, or an earthenware shard. From this usage there evolved the term “pig jar” that described an earthenware pot that could be filled with water for use as a bed-warmer. Crockery pots were also used to collect coins and these were also termed “pig jars”. By the 1700s, these pig jars had evolved into the first “piggy banks”.

51. Bygone audio brand : AIWA

Aiwa was a Japanese company that produced consumer electronics, mainly audio and video equipment. Sony bought Aiwa in 2002 and eventually discontinued the brand in 2006. The Aiwa trademark was acquired by a Chicago-based consumer electronics company in 2015.

52. Site for techies : CNET

c|net is an excellent technology website. c|net started out in 1994 as a television network specializing in technology news. The host of “American Idol”, Ryan Seacrest, started off his career as host of a c|net show.

56. “The Mod Squad” cop : LINC

The 1999 movie “The Mod Squad” was an adaptation of the seventies television show of the same name. The part of Lincoln “Linc” Hayes was played by Omar Epps, Claire Danes played Julie Barnes and Giovanni Ribisi played Peter Cochran.

59. Tuna at a luau : AHI

Yellowfin and bigeye tuna are usually marketed as “ahi”, the Hawaiian name. They are both big fish, with yellowfish tuna often weighing over 300 pounds, and bigeye tuna getting up to 400 pounds.

60. Airline once owned by Howard Hughes : TWA

Trans World Airlines (TWA) was a big carrier in the US, but was perhaps even more recognized for its extensive presence in Europe and the Middle East. For many years, especially after the collapse of Pan Am and TWA’s purchase by Howard Hughes, TWA was considered the unofficial flag carrier for the US. The company started in 1930, the product of a forced merger of Transcontinental Air Transport and Western Air Express. The Transcontinental and Western Air that resulted (the original meaning of the initialism “TWA”) was what the Postmaster General wanted, a bigger airline to which the Postal Service could award airmail contracts.

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Set of options : MENU
5. Dodge : EVADE
10. “Sing it, Sam” speaker : ILSA
14. Gospel singer Andrews : INEZ
15. Annual Big Apple parade sponsor : MACY’S
16. Darned : SEWN
17. New Zealand bird : KIWI
18. __ Wars: Rome vs. Carthage : PUNIC
19. Tizzy : SNIT
20. Vogue VIPs : EDS
21. __ wrench : ALLEN
22. With 22-Down, “People’s Court” rival : JUDGE …
23. KOA campground area : RV LOT
25. Bond film? : GLUE
27. Ally of “WarGames” : SHEEDY
29. “Westworld,” e.g. : HBO DRAMA
33. “It’s a Wonderful Life” director : CAPRA
34. Juicy fruit : BERRY
35. Up to, briefly : ‘TIL
36. Revlon rival : AVON
37. With 40-Across, party supplies found in this puzzle’s four corners : BOXED …
38. Beige shade : BONE
39. Hard to find : RARE
40. See 37-Across : … WINES
41. Fail to mention : OMIT
42. Hill builder : ANT
43. Cantina toast : SALUD!
44. __ donna : PRIMA
45. Fundamental measurement : BASE UNIT
47. __ exercise: upper arm strengthener : TRICEP
48. The “G” of GTO : GRAN
49. Apple __ : CRISP
50. Start of a French oath : SACRE …
53. Norwegian contemporary of Tchaikovsky : GRIEG
55. Bullfight “Bravo!” : OLE!
58. One-fifth of a limerick : LINE
59. Guadalajara gal pal : AMIGA
60. Target Field player : TWIN
61. Is indebted to : OWES
62. Lacked : HADN’T
63. Make (one’s way) : WEND
64. Skin pics : TATS
65. “My take is … ” : I’D SAY …
66. Circle parts : ARCS

Down

1. Karaoke need : MIKE
2. Novelist Bagnold : ENID
3. Bulletins, e.g. : NEWS REPORTS
4. “Argo” weapon : UZI
5. Use : EMPLOY
6. Event for which Kerri Strug is famous : VAULT
7. Unpopular spots : ACNE
8. Endangered species : DYING BREED
9. PC bailout key : ESC
10. Library, cardwise : ISSUER
11. Give for a while : LEND
12. Belt : SWIG
13. Deal preceder : ANTE
21. “Bridge of Spies” actor : ALDA
22. See 22-Across : … JUDY
24. Fogg’s creator : VERNE
26. Some aristocrats : LORDS
27. Egyptian beetle : SCARAB
28. Morro Castle city : HAVANA
29. Threaded fastener : HEX NUT
30. Electricity producer, perhaps : ATOMIC POWER
31. Dr. Evil’s cohort : MINI-ME
32. Pub handle : ALE TAP
34. Seeing red : BOILING MAD
37. African title of respect : BWANA
38. Foe of “moose and squirrel” : BORIS
43. “You bet” : SURE
44. Fussy sort : PRIG
46. Means of escape : EGRESS
47. International agreement : TREATY
49. Insurance giant : CIGNA
50. Part of a piggy bank : SLOT
51. Bygone audio brand : AIWA
52. Site for techies : CNET
54. Empties (of) : RIDS
56. “The Mod Squad” cop : LINC
57. Circle’s lack : ENDS
59. Tuna at a luau : AHI
60. Airline once owned by Howard Hughes : TWA

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16 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 16 Aug 2018, Thursday”

  1. LAT: 12:22, no errors. Newsday: 7:32, no errors. WSJ: 23:41, no errors; an unusually difficult one, I thought. BEQ later, if I have time.

    I’m going to be otherwise occupied for a bit, but I’ll be back in due course … so … not to worry … 😜

        1. The muscle in my upper right arm is called the “biceps” (as is the one in my upper left arm). I’m not sure if the word even has a plural form; I would have to say something like, “My biceps muscles are not what they were when I was twenty.” Nevertheless, just like the word “kudos”, the words “biceps” and “triceps” are sometime thought to be plural forms, leading to the use of “bicep” and “tricep” as singular forms.

          Hey, Jeff, I’m in Houston (for the first time in 72 years!). And I’m actually on my way to London! And this time it appears I may actually make it there!

          Later … 😜 … 😁

  2. @Anonymous … I would agree that “bicep” and “tricep” are incorrect, but, when I Google “tricep exercise”, some uses of “tricep”, without the final “s”, do show up, so maybe this is a case of the language evolving.

    In other news … BEQ: 17:10, no errors. CHE: 12:00, no errors. And, as I said above, my last post for a while …

  3. 23:12, but it sure felt longer than that. I got the theme after the fact, but it didn’t help with the solve. I like the EGRESS story.

    Loved the original movie Westworld. Loved season 1 of the HBO series. Season 2…not as much, but I’ve only seen half of it. I suppose it can be salvaged.

    Best –

  4. Had to Google once – for WINES. The little kids at my parties shouldn’t get those. Could not figure the word WINE in any corners. Was looking for party favors.

    Didn’t know Kerri or TWIN (both sports); also, didn’t know INEZ.

  5. I had a tough time with this puzzle – especially in the top right hand corner. Finally …. and slowly, i started getting the idea … and the lower parts were much more easier.

    I kept thinking Tom Hanks for Bridge of … and then the spy Rudolph Abel, er, Mark Rylance …. but nothing fit. I did not even know who Alan Alda was in the movie. ( He was Hank’s law partner …. Thomas Watters, Jr … BTw ) As, is usual, the US got screwed in the ‘spy’ exchange … an innocent p.o.w. pilot of a spy plane … for a top, established, KGB agent …. who, apparently ‘gave away’ … nothing. The russians are very tough negotiators, for good reason. Only in the US, can this be considered an honorable exchange….

    As for the frenchmen not using the word ‘sacre bleu’ as often, as an oath …. I suppose they probably just say merde, in frustration, just like most of us ….

    anyway, this is all water under the bridge …..
    Have a nice day, folks.

  6. Our effort pales in comparison, but it was very satisfying to not get only 19
    letters and miss only 1 for 90% good in an hour and a half . And any amount
    of time should not be considered wasted. This one made me want to keep
    trying and digging, just did not know enough. Some of the clues were shaky.
    I presume that we are all talking about “letters” when we talk about “errors” and “minutes and seconds” when we talk about time spent. No competition for Bill’s 8 minutes plus some seconds. Kudos, idol.

  7. Could not figure out the mid section at all. Still don’t get “boxed wines” and have never heard of hex nut. Bad day for me. Really, how do the 4 corners give you “boxed wines”? What am I missing?

    1. a hex nut is simply a nut with six-sides on it – aka it forms a hexagon. “Boxed wines” are wines that come in a box type package as opposed to the glass bottle.

      As for the 4 corners, look one square in in a perfect square (2×2) for the letters in WINE.

  8. Moderately tough Thursday for me; took about 40 minutes with no errors. Just did not know or hadn’t seen, any of the actors – except Alda – or movies – except “It’s a Wonderful Life”, which slowed me down a bit.

    The bridge is called the Glienicker Bridge, and it’s still quite the tourist attraction just on the outskirts of Berlin. I’ll probably see it the next time I’m over there, as I’m due to visit Munich and Berlin.

    While “sacre bleu” is deprecated, you can say “zut alors.” It’s used in French Canada at least; not sure about France proper.

  9. Wassup guys and gals? 🙃
    No errors on a well constructed (I thought) grid. The theme was cute, at least after the fact — it proved a red herring for me during the solve.
    Dave! Glad you’re headed to London– I hope you encounter no major problems this time! 🙄
    @ Kim from yesterday: do you mean lanes, from the bowling clue? Just refers to the lanes in a bowling alley.
    Be well ~~🥂

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