LA Times Crossword Answers 7 Aug 2018, Tuesday

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Constructed by: Jake Halperin
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: Stage Right

Themed answers each comprise two words, the second (the RIGHT) being something associated with the STAGE:

  • 62A. Theater direction … and a hint to 17-, 24-, 37- and 53-Across : STAGE RIGHT
  • 17A. Rare baseball event : TRIPLE PLAY
  • 24A. Antiterrorism legislation of 2001 : PATRIOT ACT
  • 37A. Nightlife sphere of activity : CLUB SCENE
  • 53A. Race terminus : FINISH LINE

Bill’s time: 6m 07s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

6. “The jig __!” : IS UP

Back in Elizabethan times, a “jig” was a trick or game. So, the expression “the jig is up” has for some time meant “the trick or game is exposed”.

14. The “N” of USNA : NAVAL

The United States Naval Academy (USNA) is located in Annapolis, Maryland. The USNA was founded in 1845 and educates officers for both the US Navy and the US Marine Corps. The motto of the USNA is “Ex Scientia Tridens”, which translates as “From Knowledge, Sea Power”.

15. Beer-brewing mixture : MASH

In brewing and distilling, the mash is the mixture of grain and water that is heated so that enzymes break down starch into sugars. The sugary liquor extracted from the mash is called the wort. Yeast is added to the wort, resulting in the sugars being converted to alcohol.

20. Troubling Nixon records : TAPES

Famously, there is a gap of 18½ minutes in the Nixon White House tapes. Rose Mary Woods, President Nixon’s secretary, reported that she was reviewing one of the tapes when she accidentally hit record instead of the stop button, causing about 5 minutes of erasure. There is an additional 13 minutes of “buzzing” that she could not explain. There has been much speculation about what actually happened, as a review of notes made in the meeting covered by the tape show that the arrests made at the Watergate were discussed.

23. Falafel bread : PITA

Falafel is a ball of ground chickpeas or fava beans that has been deep fried and served in pita bread. I love chickpeas, but falafel is often too dry to me …

24. Antiterrorism legislation of 2001 : PATRIOT ACT

The USA PATRIOT Act was signed into law in 2001 soon after the September 11th terrorist attacks. The name of the act is actually an acronym, standing for “Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism”.

29. Double-helix molecule : DNA

Francis Crick and James Watson discovered that DNA had a double-helix, chain-like structure, and published their results in Cambridge in 1953. To this day the discovery is mired in controversy, as some crucial results collected by fellow researcher Rosalind Franklin were used without her permission or even knowledge.

30. Slake, as thirst : QUENCH

To slake is to satisfy a craving, as in slaking one’s thirst.

31. Hardly current : PASSE

“Passé” is a French word, meaning “past, faded”. We’ve imported the term into English, and use it in the same sense.

33. Bridges of Netflix’s “Bloodline” : BEAU

The actor Beau Bridges is the son of actor Lloyd Bridges, and brother of actor Jeff Bridges. Beau’s best-known role is perhaps one of “The Fabulous Baker Boys” alongside brother Jeff.

“Bloodline” is a Netflix-original thriller television series. It’s a cleverly constructed program about a well-off family in the Florida Keys. As the show progresses, more and more dark secrets are revealed about each of the family members. I enjoyed this one …

36. Snob’s “in the air” body part : NOSE

Back in the 1780s, a snob was a shoemaker or a shoemaker’s apprentice. By the end of the 18th century the word “snob” was being used by students at Cambridge University in England to refer to all local merchants and people of the town. The term evolved to mean one who copies those who are his or her social superior (and not in a good way). From there it wasn’t a big leap for “snob” to include anyone who emphasized their superior social standing and not just those who aspired to rank. Nowadays a snob is anyone who looks down on those considered to be of inferior standing.

43. Brussels-based defense gp. : NATO

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) is an international military alliance that was established in 1949. NATO headquarters was initially set up in London, moved to Paris in 1952, and then to Brussels 1967.

48. Like a damaged atmospheric layer : OZONIC

Ozone gets its name from the Greek word “ozein” meaning “to smell”. It was given this name as ozone’s formation during lightning storms was detected by the gas’s distinctive smell. Famously, there is a relatively high concentration of the gas in the “ozone layer” in the Earth’s stratosphere. This ozone layer provides a vital function for animal life on the planet as it absorbs most of the sun’s UV radiation. A molecule of ozone is made up of three oxygen atoms, whereas a “normal” oxygen has just two atoms

50. Letter after pi : RHO

Rho is the Greek letter that looks just like our Roman letter “p”, although it is equivalent to the Roman letter R.

52. World Series org. : MLB

Major League Baseball (MLB)

58. Coins of 59-Down : RIALS
(59D. Tehran’s land : IRAN)

“Rial” is the name of the currency of Iran (as well as Yemen, Oman, Cambodia and Tunisia). Generally, there are 1,000 baisa in a rial.

67. Celebrated chef Ducasse : ALAIN

Alain Ducasse is a chef whose most famous restaurant is called Alain Ducasse at The Dorchester, which is located in the celebrated hotel in London. Ducasse was born and lived in France, In 2008, he relinquished his French citizenship to become a citizen of Monaco, so that he could take advantage of the principality’s lower rate of income tax.

68. Intuit : FEEL

“To intuit” is a verb formed from the noun “intuition”, and means “to know intuitively”.

69. Canadian gas brand : ESSO

The brand name Esso has its roots in the old Standard Oil company as it uses the initial letters of “Standard” and “Oil” (ESS-O). The Esso brand was replaced by Exxon in the US, but ESSO is still used in many other countries.

70. Big Apple 52-Acr. player : NY MET
(52A. World Series org. : MLB)

The New York Mets baseball team was founded in 1962 as a replacement for two teams that the city had lost, namely the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Giants. For several years the Mets played very poorly, finishing no better than second-to-last in their division. Then of course along came the “Miracle Mets” (aka “Amazin’ Mets”) who beat the Baltimore Orioles in 1969 to claim the World Series in a huge upset.

Down

2. Tennis great Navratilova : MARTINA

Martina Navratilova is a retired tennis player who is thought by many to have been the greatest player of all time. Navratilova won the Wimbledon singles title a record nine times, which is one of many records that she holds. She was born in Czechoslovakia but asked for political asylum in the US in 1975 at 18 years of age. Navratilova was granted temporary residency in the US and as a result was stripped of her Czech citizenship. That Czech citizenship was restored in 2008, making her a dual citizen.

4. Frank of avant-garde rock : ZAPPA

Frank Zappa was an American composer and guitarist. He was a solo artist as well as the founding member of the rock band Mothers of Invention. You might like to meet his four children: Moon Unit, Dweezil, Ahmet Emuukha Rodan, and Diva Thin Muffin Pigeen.

5. Magazine with the column “Ask E. Jean” : ELLE

E. Jean Carroll is the journalist behind the advice column “Ask E Jean” that has appeared in “Elle” magazine since 1993. Carroll also co-founded the website Greatboyfriends.com with her sister Cande Carroll. The site is used by women who want to recommend their ex-boyfriends to each other.

7. Dinner course, to Heinrich : SALAT

Our word “salad” comes from the Latin “salare” meaning “to salt”. The Latin “herba salata” translates as “salted vegetables”, which I guess could be a salad …

8. TWA rival : USAIR

From 1953, what we recently referred to as US Airways was called Allegheny Airlines. In the seventies, customers became very dissatisfied with the company’s service levels as it struggled to manage a rapid expansion in its number of flights. These problems earned the airline the nickname “Agony Air”. Allegheny tried to leave the “agony” behind in 1979 and changed its name to USAir, but commuters then just used the nickname “Unfortunately Still Allegheny”. The name was changed again, in 1997, to US Airways. US Airways merged with American Airlines in 2013, and the “US Airways” brand name was gradually replaced with “American Airlines”.

10. Equal or Splenda : SWEETENER

Splenda and Equal are brand names for the artificial sweetener sucralose.

11. Italian pal : PAISANO

“Paisano” translates literally from Spanish as “fellow countryman”, but is also used to mean “pal”.

12. “Bel Canto” novelist Patchett : ANN

Ann Patchett is an author who lives in Nashville, Tennessee. Patchett’s most famous work is probably her novel “Bel Canto”, published in 2001. In 2012, “Time” included her in the magazine’s list of 100 most influential people in the world.

13. Video game letters : NES

The Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) was sold in North America from 1985 to to 1995. The NES was the biggest selling gaming console of the era. Nintendo replaced the NES with Wii, which is also the biggest-selling game console in the world.

22. Singer Rawls : LOU

Lou Rawls was an American soul and blues singer known for his smooth vocal style. With his singing career well on the way, Rawls was asked to sing “The Star Spangled Banner” in 1977 at a Muhammad Ali fight in Madison Square Garden. This performance led to him being asked to sing the anthem many, many times in the coming years with his last rendition being at a World Series game in 2005. Rawls passed away in January of the following year.

23. Jack-in-the-box sound : POP

A Jack-in-the-box is child’s toy. It’s a box with a crank handle at the side. Turning the crank causes a tune to play (usually “Pop Goes the Weasel”), and at the right moment the lid pops open and a spring loaded clown character jumps up out of the box.

25. Limerick’s rhyme scheme : AABBA

No one knows for sure how the limerick got its name, although there does seem to be agreement the name does indeed come from the city or county of Limerick in Ireland. Try this one for size:

There was a young lady named Bright
who traveled much faster than light.
She set out one day
in a relative way,
and came back the previous night.

26. Emails a dupe to : CCS

A blind carbon copy (bcc) is a copy of a document or message that is sent to someone without other recipients of the message knowing about that extra copy.

27. First word of numerous Grisham titles : THE

John Grisham is a lawyer and an incredibly successful author best known for his legal thrillers. After graduating from law school, Grisham practiced law for about ten years and then went into politics. He served in the Mississippi House of Representatives for six years, during which time he wrote his first novel, “A Time to Kill”.

29. Md. neighbor : DEL

The state of Delaware takes its name from Virginia’s first colonial governor, Englishman Thomas West, 3rd Baron De La Warr. Delaware is known as the First State as it was the first to ratify the US Constitution, in 1787.

32. German veal dish : SCHNITZEL

Schnitzel is an Austrian dish made from slices of meat that have been tenderized and thinned with a wooden mallet, and then coated in breadcrumbs and fried. The variant known as Wiener Schnitzel (i.e. Viennese schnitzel) is usually made from veal, although now that veal had fallen into disfavor due to concerns about animal rights, it is often made from pork.

34. Approximate fig. : EST

Estimate (est.)

39. Opposite of paleo- : NEO-

The prefix “paleo-” means “prehistoric, primitive”. It comes from the Greek word “palaios” which means “old, ancient”. The prefix “neo-” would be the opposite, meaning “new, recent”.

41. Action film weapon : UZI

The first Uzi submachine gun was designed in the late 1940s by Major Uziel “Uzi” Gal of the Israel Defense Forces, who gave his name to the gun.

45. Composite dental filling material : AMALGAM

Amalgam is an alloy of mercury with some other metal. Many dental fillings are made of an amalgam of silver and mercury. We started using “amalgam” to mean “blend of different things” around 1790.

49. Syr. neighbor : ISR

The land that is now Israel was ruled by the British after WWI as the British Mandate of Palestine. The British evacuated the area after WWII, largely responding to pressure from both Jewish and Arab nationalist movements. The British Mandate expired on 14 May 1948 and the State of israel was established at the same time. This declaration of a new state was followed by the immediate invasion of the area by four Arab countries and the start of the 1948 Arab-Israeli War. A ceasefire was declared after a year of fighting, and tension has persisted in the region ever since.

55. Tilted type: Abbr. : ITALS

Italic type leans to the right, and is often used to provide emphasis in text. The style is known as “italic” because the stylized calligraphic form of writing originated in Italy, probably in the Vatican.

59. Tehran’s land : IRAN

Tehran is the capital of Iran and is the largest city in the Middle East, with a population of about 8.5 million. Iran has been around a really long time and Tehran is actually the country’s 31st national capital.

60. Collie’s comment : ARF!

The collie isn’t actually a breed of dog, but rather the name given to a group of herding dogs that originated in Scotland and Northern England. An obvious (and wonderful) example would be the Border Collie. Many dogs classed as collies don’t have the word “collie” in the name of the breed, for example the Old English Sheepdog and the Shetland Sheepdog.

61. Clog front : TOE

Clogs are shoes made from wood, at least in part. The clog originated as a protective item of footwear for use by farm, factory and mine workers.

63. Mop & __: cleaning brand : GLO

Mop & Glo is brand of floor cleaner and polish.

64. Blasting letters : TNT

“TNT” is an abbreviation for trinitrotoluene. Trinitrotoluene was first produced in 1863 by the German chemist Joseph Wilbrand, who developed it for use as a yellow dye. TNT is relatively difficult to detonate so it was on the market as a dye for some years before its more explosive properties were discovered.

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Knock for a loop : AMAZE
6. “The jig __!” : IS UP
10. Wing measurement : SPAN
14. The “N” of USNA : NAVAL
15. Beer-brewing mixture : MASH
16. Taper off : WANE
17. Rare baseball event : TRIPLE PLAY
19. 28-Across, in German : EINS
20. Troubling Nixon records : TAPES
21. Supermarket walkways : AISLES
23. Falafel bread : PITA
24. Antiterrorism legislation of 2001 : PATRIOT ACT
28. Single : ONE
29. Double-helix molecule : DNA
30. Slake, as thirst : QUENCH
31. Hardly current : PASSE
33. Bridges of Netflix’s “Bloodline” : BEAU
36. Snob’s “in the air” body part : NOSE
37. Nightlife sphere of activity : CLUB SCENE
40. “That sounds painful” : OUCH!
43. Brussels-based defense gp. : NATO
44. Clear data from : ERASE
48. Like a damaged atmospheric layer : OZONIC
50. Letter after pi : RHO
52. World Series org. : MLB
53. Race terminus : FINISH LINE
56. Smear, as paint : DAUB
57. Narrow waterway : STRAIT
58. Coins of 59-Down : RIALS
60. All-encompassing : A TO Z
62. Theater direction … and a hint to 17-, 24-, 37- and 53-Across : STAGE RIGHT
65. Actor’s part : ROLE
66. Narrate : TELL
67. Celebrated chef Ducasse : ALAIN
68. Intuit : FEEL
69. Canadian gas brand : ESSO
70. Big Apple 52-Acr. player : NY MET

Down

1. Colony insect : ANT
2. Tennis great Navratilova : MARTINA
3. Takes to the skies : AVIATES
4. Frank of avant-garde rock : ZAPPA
5. Magazine with the column “Ask E. Jean” : ELLE
6. Little devil : IMP
7. Dinner course, to Heinrich : SALAT
8. TWA rival : USAIR
9. Body structure : PHYSIQUE
10. Equal or Splenda : SWEETENER
11. Italian pal : PAISANO
12. “Bel Canto” novelist Patchett : ANN
13. Video game letters : NES
18. Little League broadcaster : ESPN
22. Singer Rawls : LOU
23. Jack-in-the-box sound : POP
25. Limerick’s rhyme scheme : AABBA
26. Emails a dupe to : CCS
27. First word of numerous Grisham titles : THE
29. Md. neighbor : DEL
32. German veal dish : SCHNITZEL
34. Approximate fig. : EST
35. Oak-to-be : ACORN
38. Not pure : UNCHASTE
39. Opposite of paleo- : NEO-
40. “That sounds painful” : OOF!
41. Action film weapon : UZI
42. Bring comfort to : CONSOLE
45. Composite dental filling material : AMALGAM
46. Flavored icy drink : SLUSHIE
47. Recede, as a tide : EBB
49. Syr. neighbor : ISR
51. Often hyperlinked word : HERE
54. Low-cal beers : LITES
55. Tilted type: Abbr. : ITALS
56. Newspaper frequency : DAILY
59. Tehran’s land : IRAN
60. Collie’s comment : ARF!
61. Clog front : TOE
63. Mop & __: cleaning brand : GLO
64. Blasting letters : TNT

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26 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 7 Aug 2018, Tuesday”

  1. LAT: 8:06, no errors. Newsday: 5:38, no errors. WSJ: 11:42, no errors. Tim Croce in the offing.

    @Glenn … I’ve avoided the “Monthly Music Meta” partly for lack of time and partly because music and sports are my weakest areas. I did think about getting the “Boswords” puzzles and I’ll be interested to hear what you think of them, but again, time is the issue. (I still haven’t gotten around to doing the ACPT puzzles. I ordered the paper versions of those and somehow my name got put on the wrong list, so it took two or three months and a WTH email to them before they finally arrived, by which time I was busy with other things.)

    1. Tim Croce’s latest: 46:54, no errors, but with one clue/answer pairing I don’t understand at all: “Cross needs” => “INKS”?! Maybe “Cross” is the last name of some artist?

  2. I guess I am the first …. or maybe its too early in the day for easterners.
    I had a good time with this puzzle …. even the long answers were very guessable.

    Rials ( Iranian – ) and riyals (Saudi Arabia ) of various countries differ tremendously, in value. The Saudi Riyal is about 4 to a US dollar …. and the Iranian Rial is a whopping 42,105 to one US dollar !!! Btw, the most popular currency notes on the streets of Tehran, I have read in Wikipedia, is a US 100 dollar bill …..

    Thank you Carrie, for your best wishes, for a problem, I am not able to share. Thank you also for the Puerto Rican reference …. in West Side story. Probably ‘spic’ comes from their pronunciation of the word ‘speak’….. Btw, I was staying in an airbnb in central Washington DC NW, when my trip was unexpected cut short. It was an African-american and Spanish neighborhood ….
    Btw, Marijuana, medical and recreational is fully legal in Washington DC …. and I observed several “smoke-ins” at the various parks nearby – but did not partake …. or inhale…. other than second hand.

    The indian-pakistani-sri lankan equivalent to Paisano is ‘desi’ …. as in Desi Arnaz (lol). Desi means from the country, back home.

    Have a nice day, all.

  3. 8Down…left out Piedmont Airlines…merged in1989 with USAir…(they
    were a terrific regional airline)…in 1997 USAir changed the name to
    US Airways.
    Ann L

  4. LAT: 5:51, no errors. WSJ: 10:19, no errors. Jones: 7:37, no errors. New Yorker (yesterday): DNF after 45 minutes after about 95%, needed 1 entry to finish in the top left. Kinda with how the days have been going, I’m still behind (Thu-Sat NYT still sitting here). And the Music Meta to come…

    @Dave
    Boswords was all electronic so I paid and had the puzzles by the end of the day. To be expected though since I ordered it 2-3 days after that contest. They also threw in 4 more puzzles outside the contest ones (10 total), so I can’t say I can complain about their fulfillment end. The puzzles themselves remain to be seen…

    1. MMM: DNF, 28 minutes, no errors. Had to look up a couple of non-music type things to finish the puzzle out, along with check a few things (answers aren’t given until next Tuesday). The constructor that does this is about like any constructor in throwing weird garbage into their puzzles that few would have reason to know or this reason or that. So more or less, just like any other crossword puzzle. It’ll have to wait a little to see if I can pull the meta question out.

      @Heidi, @Dave
      The book I mentioned yesterday is a Movie Crosswords book (mostly Wed/Thu NYT difficulty level). I could say the same that I’m weak about it, but I’ve managed to finish most of them, save a few where I did have to know something esoteric like movie stars of 70 years ago. So I guess all one could say is you never know…

      1. @Glenn … There’s a poster (anonymous, aka “Mark”) on today’s (syndie) NYT blog who wants to know how to get the NYT puzzles. I gave him advice that may or may not be correct; you can probably help him more than I.

  5. 10:30 including a few seconds to look for an “error”. Turns out my error is I had simply left one square blank.

    @Anon
    I had to raise an eyebrow with OZONIC as well. I suppose it’s one of those crosswordic words we don’t use that often in normal speech.

    Best –

    1. I’m sure you meant to say “normalistic speechifying”? … 😜

      The use of “ozonic” gave me pause, as well, but I checked and found it in a couple of dictionaries. (However, I also discovered recently that the preferred American pronunciation of “February” is now “feb-yoo-ary”. When did that happen?)

  6. I’ve been thinking abt the very unpopular Sunday puzzle, and at least one commenter’s suggestion that the complainers keep it to themselves. I think the complaints should be considered customer feedback. The LA Times isn’t printing the puzzles out of the kindness of their corporate heart. They do it to increase the paper’s ability to make money. Any business who ignores customer complaints is going to have a hard time staying in business, and I feel fairly certain that the powers that be at the LAT and the Tribune Content Agency, and Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis, are interested in customer feedback, even for crossword puzzles.

    My other thoughts have been abt what made the puzzle so unpleasant for so many people. Was it the anagrams, which I looked for, but only figured out 2? Maybe because the anagram answers were so long, and relied on the crosses, with the usual obscure weekend cluing?

    Vidwan, I’m glad to see you back. I was wondering.

    1. I found Sunday’s puzzle unusually difficult and I worked out the anagrams only after I had finished the puzzle using the odd clues for the theme entries, plus crosses. But I didn’t hate it and I didn’t think anyone really suggested that those who hated it keep it to themselves … only that they should accept the puzzle as a sort of outlier in the normal range one might expect to see.

      Once again, I am reminded of a post from several years ago, on Bill’s NYT blog, from one John Matthews:

      “When I solve a puzzle, I feel very clever. When I fail to solve one, I think the puzzle is unfair. But if I could solve every one, I’d stop doing them.”

      Which is to say: Making the puzzles too difficult is not the only way to lose customers … 😜.

    2. The Sunday puzzle was difficult primarily due to the anagrams, coupled with obscure cluing and several pieces of next to unused crosswordese (FOMO? TINCT?). I knew out of the gate what the theme was due to the title, but you still need crosses to figure out what the words are. I’d comment more, but I don’t have that particular solve anymore to reference where my errors happened. It profiled out to a Sat LAT/Thu NYT for me, which I managed saved the errors. More or less, it wasn’t that different than the average Sunday NYT – and ironically played exactly like the particular NYT puzzle that came out the same day.

      As for feedback, people do need to be voicing that for any publishing house. I can’t say I know what Rich Norris et al does (I doubt he even bothers, to be honest), but I do know Shortz has mentioned he reads around blogs and things for commentary, mostly the one the NYT runs. The problem with most of the feedback is that the only ones they hear from mostly are the savant types (either their own testers or the general populace) that all easily can do every puzzle in half the time that Bill does. To wit, I’m reminded of Ellen Ripstein’s quote in Wordplay about not getting why crosswords are so hard for everybody else – most all the crossword savant community functions in this way. Of course, they don’t get why crosswords aren’t as accepted as they want them to be. So the puzzles tend to be rated pretty poorly when they’re easy, pretty highly when they’re difficult, and they miss the things that would be frustrating to 98% of their crossword solvers like obscure words, things no one has ever heard of, or clue/answer combinations that are complete total nonsense. So more or less, they don’t get feedback, it’s questionable if they even care about it, or if they do, it’s from the wrong people.

      (I may have to post this to my blog soon with this quoted, as the second paragraph would be a very good discussion topic.)

      @Dave
      >Making the puzzles too difficult is not the only way to lose customers …

      Actually, making things too difficult shouldn’t be underestimated. Most people, myself included, want a decent fair challenge. If it stays too easy, it’s not interesting, if it’s too hard then people get frustrated and stop doing it (that was where the Sunday puzzle laid).

      As your pal Allen says, there’s fair difficulty and then there’s manufactured difficulty, which the Sunday puzzle and most of the NYT puzzles lay. I don’t play Croce or the Sat Newsday all that much because they’re impossible for me, while I don’t play Newsday the rest of the week or USA Today because it’s generally *too* easy. But there’s enough puzzles around and about (thinking of my crossword list), that most people should be able to find the right kind of challenge for them. The only catch is when the puzzle they get is different than the puzzle they expect. That was definitely true of Sunday’s grid.

      1. >puzzles tend to be rated

        As another thought, most of them tend to hear from people when things are bad more than if they do a good puzzle. In that sense, it’s good to fill up places where you know the editors read when things are good, too.

  7. 1 hour with 5 omissions and 1 error. Blew DNA and just did not know
    CLUB SCENE and STAGE RIGHT. 97% correct; good for Geezer Tuesday.
    I see that Glenn nosed out Bill at the wire. Hard puzzle overall.

  8. I never heard of ozonic either. Carrie , I much appreciate the fellow crossword solver empathy. Vidwan, hope brighter days are ahead. Love reading your comments and learning from you. You make me smile.

  9. I have a relative in ahospital – hopefully ashort stay, and the prognosis is excellent. An totally avoidable ‘illness’
    Thank you for thinking of me. At my age, I take it one day ata time …. and I am constantly reminded that we are on;y guests in this world.

    I too, wondered about Ozonic …. but I’ve heard of Moronic, and Ozonic is only half a stratosphere away ….

    Keep well, all.

  10. Hello folks!! 🙃
    No errors, tho I did have SLURPEE before SLUSHIE. 🍺

    Hey Vidwan, glad to hear the good news about your relative. 🙄 I hope your Airbnb was pleasant! The vast majority of Airbnbs are excellent (including mine!!😊) but I’m always bothered by the attention given in the media to BAD Airbnb experiences. Also, FWIW, I’ve heard that “spic” comes from Hispanic, when the word is kinda slurred. A slur from a slurred word! Hmmm…

    Be well ~~🥀🌻🌺

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