LA Times Crossword Answers 9 Aug 2018, Thursday

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Constructed by: Jeffrey Wechsler
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: Island Retreats

Themed answers include the name of ISLANDS as hidden words. Those names are written backwards, are RETREATING:

  • 58A. Vacation spots found in each set of puzzle circles : ISLAND RETREATS
  • 16A. Lombardy skiing destination : THE ITALIAN ALPS (hiding “LANAI” retreating)
  • 22A. One of many standing in a Mexican bar : TEQUILA BOTTLE (hiding “BALI” retreating)
  • 36A. Gene Autry Easter song critter : PETER COTTONTAIL (hiding “CRETE” retreating)
  • 48A. Carl Orff opus : CARMINA BURANA (hiding “ARUBA” retreating)
  • Bill’s time: 7m 30s

    Bill’s errors: 0

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    Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

    Across

    1. Kvetch’s phrase : OY GEVALT!

    The Yiddish expression “oy gevalt” is often translated as “enough already”.

    The word “kvetch” comes to us from Yiddish, with “kvetshn” meaning “to complain” or “squeeze”.

    16. Lombardy skiing destination : THE ITALIAN ALPS (hiding “LANAI”)

    There are twenty administrative regions of Italy, one of which is Lombardy. Lombardy is in the very north of the country, and its capital is the city of Milan.

    Lanai is the sixth largest of the Hawaiian Islands. Lanai was first spotted by Europeans just a few days after Captain Cook was killed on the Big Island of Hawaii in 1779. In 1922, the Hawaiian Pineapple Company bought the whole island of Lanai and turned most of it into the world’s largest pineapple plantation. Since then, Lanai has been known as “The Pineapple Island”. Today, 98% of the island is owned by Larry Ellison, the CEO of Oracle, and 2% is owned by the State of Hawaii.

    20. Addams cousin : ITT

    In the television sitcom “The Addams Family”, the family had a frequent visitor called Cousin Itt. Itt is a short man with long hair that runs from his head to the floor. Cousin Itt was played by Italian actor Felix Silla.

    They’re creepy and they’re kooky,
    Mysterious and spooky,
    They’re altogether ooky,
    The Addams Family.

    22. One of many standing in a Mexican bar : TEQUILA BOTTLE (hiding “BALI”)

    Tequila is a city in Mexico that is located about 40 miles northwest of Guadalajara in the state of Jalisco. The city is the birthplace of the drink called “tequila”. Local people made a variety of a drink called mezcal by fermenting the heart of the blue agave plant that is native to the area surrounding Tequila. It was the Spanish who introduced the distillation process to the mescal, giving us what we now know as “tequila”.

    Bali is both an island and a province in Indonesia. It is a popular tourist spot, although the number of visitors dropped for a few years as a result of terrorist bombings in 2002 and 2005 that killed mainly tourists. Bali became more popular starting in 2008 due to a significant and favorable change in the exchange rate between the US dollar and the Indonesian rupiah.

    27. Merged comm. giant : GTE

    GTE was a rival to AT&T, the largest of the independent competitors to the Bell System. GTE merged with Bell Atlantic in 2000 to form the company that we know today as Verizon. Verizon made some high-profile acquisitions over the years, including MCI in 2005 and AOL in 2015.

    36. Gene Autry Easter song critter : PETER COTTONTAIL (hiding “CRETE”)

    “Peter Cottontail” is a 1949 Easter song by Steve Nelson and Jack Rollins, the same composers who came up with “Frosty the Snowman” in 1950. The most famous version of Peter Cottontail was recorded by singing cowboy Gene Autry.

    Gene Autry was a so-called singing cowboy who had an incredibly successful career on radio, television and in films starting in the thirties. Autry’s signature song was “Back in the Saddle Again”, and his biggest hit was “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer”. He also had a hit with his own Christmas song called “Here Comes Santa Claus”. There’s even a town in Oklahoma called Gene Autry, named in his honor. Famously, Autry owned the Los Angeles Angels baseball team for many years, from 1961 to 1997.

    Crete is the largest of the Greek Islands. Crete figures heavily in Greek mythology. Zeus was born in a cave at Mount Ida, the highest peak on the island. Crete was also home to the Labyrinth where the Minotaur was slain by Theseus. Icarus and Daedalus, after having crafted the Labyrinth, escaped from the island using wings that they crafted.

    42. Moot point : NONISSUE

    To moot is to bring up as a subject for discussion or debate. So, something that is moot is open to debate. Something that is no longer moot, is no longer worth debating. We don’t seem to be able get that right, which drives me crazy …

    43. Toulouse-Lautrec’s birthplace : ALBI

    Albi is a town in southern France that is perhaps most famous as the birthplace of artist Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. Albi’s Musée Toulouse-Lautrec is home to the world’s largest collection of the artist’s works.

    The celebrated French painter Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec came from an aristocratic family. This breeding may have made life comfortable for him, but it was the source of his famous disabilities. He had congenital conditions that resulted from the inbreeding that was a tradition in his family (Henri’s parents were first cousins).

    46. Like -trix, at times: Abbr. : FEM

    The feminine suffix “-trix” is Latin in origin, and is equivalent to the male suffix “tor”. Examples of usage would be “aviatrix” and “aviator”. Similarly, the feminine suffix “-ette” came into English from French, with the suffix “-et” being the male equivalent. Examples of usage would be “brunette” and “brunet”.

    47. Brief “I think” : IMO

    In my opinion (IMO)

    48. Carl Orff opus : CARMINA BURANA (hiding “ARUBA”)

    “Carmina Burana” is a cantata by Carl Orff based on a collection of medieval poems that go by the same name. The name translates as “Songs from Beuern”. The best known movement of the cantata by far is the dramatic “O Fortuna” used at the opening and closing of the piece. One study placed “O Fortuna” as the most often played piece of classical music in the UK over the past 75 years, largely due to its use in television commercials. Famously, the piece appeared in the US in ads for Gatorade and Old Spice aftershave.

    Aruba is one of the so-called ABC Islands located off the northern coast of Venezuela. “ABC Islands” is a name given to the three westernmost islands of the Leeward Antilles in the Caribbean. The nickname comes from the first letters of the island names: Aruba, Bonaire and Curaçao. All three of the ABC Islands are part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands.

    54. “Law & Order: __” : SVU

    “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit” is a spin-off from the TV crime drama “Law & Order”. “SVU” has been on the air since 1999, and is set in New York City. Interestingly (to me), there is a very successful Russian adaptation of the show that is set in Moscow.

    55. Boy of la casa : NINO

    In Spanish, a “sala” (room) is a “división” (division) of a “casa” (house).

    56. Farmers’ business: Abbr. : INS

    Farmers Insurance was set up in 1928 as Farmers Automobile Inter-Insurance Exchange in Los Angeles. The intent was to provide cheaper insurance to farmers and ranchers, a group that the Farmers’ founders believed to be safer drivers.

    67. Car named for a small warship : CORVETTE

    The Chevrolet Corvette was introduced to the world in 1953, and was named after the small, maneuverable warship called a corvette. The “vette” has legs. It is the only American sports car that has been around for over 50 years.

    Down

    2. Pirate song snippet : YO-HO

    The fictional sea shanty called “Dead Man’s Chest” was introduced in Robert Louis Stevenson’s great novel, “Treasure Island”. In the book, Stevenson only describes the chorus, which goes:

    Fifteen men on the dead man’s chest–
    …Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!
    Drink and the devil had done for the rest–
    …Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!

    4. Site with clickable RSVPs : EVITE

    Evite.com is a website launched in 1998 that is used to create, send and manage “evites”, online invitations.

    RSVP stands for “répondez s’il vous plaît”, which is French for “answer, please”.

    6. Helen Keller is on its st. quarter : ALA

    Helen Keller became a noted author despite been deaf and blind, largely through the work of her teacher, Anne Sullivan. Keller was left deaf and blind after an illness (possible meningitis or scarlet fever). when she was about 18 months old. She was to become the first deaf and blind person to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree. The relationship between Sullivan and Keller is immortalized in the play and film called “The Miracle Worker”.

    9. Cygnus’ brightest star : DENEB

    Deneb is the brightest star in the constellation Cygnus, the Swan. The name “Deneb” comes from the Arabic word “dhaneb” meaning “tail”, as it lies at the tail of the swan.

    10. Budget rival : ALAMO

    The third largest car rental company over recent years is Alamo, which was founded in 1974. Alamo made inroads (pun!) into the market by popularizing the idea of “unlimited mileage”.

    11. Gretchen of “Manchester by the Sea” : MOL

    Gretchen Mol is the actress who plays Gillian Darmody on the HBO drama series “Boardwalk Empire”. Mol also played the title role in the 2005 film “The Notorious Bettie Page”.

    “Manchester by the Sea” is a 2016 movie starring Casey Affleck as a brother who is left minding his teenage nephew after his brother dies. Most of the film was shot in the Massachusetts town of Manchester-by-the-Sea.

    13. Mortar’s partner : PESTLE

    I’ve always loved the sound of the words “mortar” and “pestle”, ever since I was first introduced to them in the chemistry lab. The Romans called a receptacle for pounding or grinding things a “mortarium”, giving us “mortar”. Mortarium was also the word for the product of pounding and grinding, which gives us our “mortar” that’s used with bricks to build a wall. And further, short stubby cannons used in the 16th century resembled a grinding bowl and so were called “mortars”, which evolved into our contemporary weapon of the same name. As far as the pestle is concerned, it is also derived from its Latin name “pistillum”, which comes from the word for “crush”.

    21. “Chopped” host Allen : TED

    Ted Allen is a TV personality who found fame as the food and wine expert on Brave show “Queer Eye”. He started as host of the cooking competition show “Chopped” in 2009.

    24. “Spenser: For Hire” actor : URICH

    Robert Urich was an actor famous for starring in television’s “Vega$” and “Spenser: For Hire”. Urich appeared in many television shows, starring in fifteen, which is a record for any actor.

    27. Econ. indicator : GDP

    A country’s Gross National Product (GNP) is the value of all services and products produced by its residents in a particular year. GNP includes all production wherever it is in the world, as long as the business is owned by residents of the country concerned. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is different, although related, and is the value of all services and goods produced within the borders of the country for that year.

    32. Sturdy fabric : DENIM

    Denim fabric originated in Nimes in France. The French phrase “de Nimes” (meaning “from Nimes”) gives us the word “denim”. Also, the French phrase “bleu de Genes” (meaning “blue of Genoa”) gives us our word “jeans”.

    33. RR stop : STN

    A station (“stn.” or “sta.”) is a railroad (RR) stop.

    34. Copier need : TONER

    The key features of a laser printer (or copier) are that it uses plain paper and produces quality text at high speed. Laser printers work by projecting a laser image of the printed page onto a rotating drum that is coated with photoconductors (material that becomes conductive when exposed to light). The areas of the drum exposed to the laser carry a different charge than the unexposed areas. Dry ink (toner) sticks to the exposed areas due to electrostatic charge. The toner is then transferred to paper by contact and is fused into the paper by the application of heat. So, that explains why paper coming out of a laser printer is warm, and sometimes powdery.

    35. Jungian archetype : ANIMA

    The concepts of anima and animus are found in the Carl Jung school of analytical psychology. The idea is that within each male there resides a feminine inner personality called the anima, and within each female there is a male inner personality known as the animus.

    37. Stir-fry staple : TOFU

    “Tofu” is a name for bean curd, and is a Japanese word meaning just that … bean that has curdled. Tofu is produced by coagulating soy milk, using either salt or something acidic. Once the protein has coagulated, the curds are pressed into the familiar blocks. Personally I love tofu, but my wife, she absolutely hates it …

    39. Periodic table suffix : -IUM

    Dmitri Mendeleev was a Russian chemist. When Mendeleev classified elements according to their chemical properties, he noticed patterns and was able to group elements into his famous 1869 Periodic Table. So powerful was his table that he actually predicted the properties of some elements that had not even been discovered in 1869. Element number 101 is mendelevium and was named after Mendeleev.

    40. Celestial feline : LEO

    The constellation named Leo can be said to resemble a lion. Others say that it resembles a bent coat hanger. “Leo” is the Latin for “lion”, but I’m not sure how to translate “coat hanger” into Latin …

    43. Carrier products, briefly : ACS

    The modern form of air conditioning (AC) that is still used today was invented by Willis Carrier in 1902. He co-founded the Carrier Engineering Corporation in New York in 1915. The Carrier Corporation eventually moved to Syracuse, New York in 1937. Beyond the world of air conditioning, the Carrier name has been associated with Syracuse University’s famous Carrier Dome since it opened in 1980. The Carrier Dome is the largest on-campus basketball stadium in the country.

    49. Ludicrous : INANE

    Our word “inane” meaning silly or lacking substance comes from the Latin “inanitis” meaning “empty space”.

    50. Array just before an odometer reaches 100,000 : NINES

    An odometer measures distance traveled. “Odometer comes from the Greek “hodos” meaning “path” and “metron” meaning “measure”.

    52. __ acid : BORIC

    Boric acid is a weak acid that usually comes as a white powder for domestic use. The powder can be dissolved in water and used as an antiseptic.

    57. Dele canceler : STET

    “Stet” is a Latin word meaning “let it stand”. In editorial work, the typesetter is instructed to disregard any change previously marked by writing the word “stet” and then underscoring that change with a line of dots or dashes.

    60. Eclectic musician Brian : ENO

    Brian Eno is a musician, composer and record producer from England who first achieved fame as the synthesizer player with Roxy Music. As a producer, Eno has worked with David Bowie, Devo, Talking Heads and U2.

    61. Original D&D company : TSR

    Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) is a complex role-playing game (RPG) introduced in 1974 by Tactical Studies Rules Incorporated (TSR). Dungeons & Dragons was probably the first of the modern role-playing games to be developed, and the most successful. It is still played by lots of people today, including my youngest son …

    62. Prepare to drag : REV

    Back in the 18th century “drag” was slang for a wagon or buggy, as it was “dragged” along by a horse or horses. In the 1930s, the underworld adopted “drag” as slang for an automobile. This sense of the word was imported into automobile racing in the forties, giving the name to “drag racing”. A drag race is basically a competition between two cars to determine which can accelerate faster from a standstill.

    63. Sault __ Marie : STE

    Sault Ste. Marie is the name of two cities on either side of the Canada-US border, one in Ontario and the other in Michigan. The two cities were originally one settlement in the 17th century, established by Jesuit Missionaries. The missionaries gave the settlement the name “Sault Sainte Marie”, which can be translated as “Saint Mary’s Falls”. The city was one community until 1817, when a US-UK Joint Boundary Commission set the border along the St. Mary’s River.

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    Complete List of Clues/Answers

    Across

    1. Kvetch’s phrase : OY GEVALT!
    9. Obstruct : DAM UP
    14. Military award phrase : FOR VALOR
    15. Cut out for marriage? : ELOPE
    16. Lombardy skiing destination : THE ITALIAN ALPS (hiding “LANAI”)
    18. Feed bit : OAT
    19. “Can I get a word in here?” : AHEM!
    20. Addams cousin : ITT
    22. One of many standing in a Mexican bar : TEQUILA BOTTLE (hiding “BALI”)
    27. Merged comm. giant : GTE
    29. Large garden ornament : URN
    30. Viewed warily : EYED
    31. Looks down on : DISDAINS
    34. Gas __ : TAX
    36. Gene Autry Easter song critter : PETER COTTONTAIL (hiding “CRETE”)
    41. Extreme degree : NTH
    42. Moot point : NONISSUE
    43. Toulouse-Lautrec’s birthplace : ALBI
    46. Like -trix, at times: Abbr. : FEM
    47. Brief “I think” : IMO
    48. Carl Orff opus : CARMINA BURANA (hiding “ARUBA”)
    54. “Law & Order: __” : SVU
    55. Boy of la casa : NINO
    56. Farmers’ business: Abbr. : INS
    58. Vacation spots found in each set of puzzle circles : ISLAND RETREATS
    64. Stand out : SHINE
    65. Behind closed doors : IN SECRET
    66. Publicizes showily : HYPES
    67. Car named for a small warship : CORVETTE

    Down

    1. Many times o’er : OFT
    2. Pirate song snippet : YO-HO
    3. Classic circus adjective : GREATEST
    4. Site with clickable RSVPs : EVITE
    5. Industrial-sized tank : VAT
    6. Helen Keller is on its st. quarter : ALA
    7. Brief chuckle : LOL
    8. Dry run : TRIAL
    9. Cygnus’ brightest star : DENEB
    10. Budget rival : ALAMO
    11. Gretchen of “Manchester by the Sea” : MOL
    12. Presumptuous : UPPITY
    13. Mortar’s partner : PESTLE
    17. Revelation reaction : AHA!
    21. “Chopped” host Allen : TED
    23. Ice cream buy : QUART
    24. “Spenser: For Hire” actor : URICH
    25. __ particular order : IN NO
    26. Student’s backpack burden : TEXTS
    27. Econ. indicator : GDP
    28. Exec’s accessory : TIE
    32. Sturdy fabric : DENIM
    33. RR stop : STN
    34. Copier need : TONER
    35. Jungian archetype : ANIMA
    37. Stir-fry staple : TOFU
    38. Buddha statues, Japanese silk prints, etc. : ASIAN ART
    39. Periodic table suffix : -IUM
    40. Celestial feline : LEO
    43. Carrier products, briefly : ACS
    44. Profuse : LAVISH
    45. Like some hillsides : BRUSHY
    49. Ludicrous : INANE
    50. Array just before an odometer reaches 100,000 : NINES
    51. “So?” : AND?
    52. __ acid : BORIC
    53. Family member : NIECE
    57. Dele canceler : STET
    59. Cup rim : LIP
    60. Eclectic musician Brian : ENO
    61. Original D&D company : TSR
    62. Prepare to drag : REV
    63. Sault __ Marie : STE

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    14 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 9 Aug 2018, Thursday”

    1. good puzzle but a lot of abbreviations. took me almost an hour and that only happens on Saturday. still love them. so addicted

    2. LAT: 21:12, no errors; had a rough time with it, and not quite sure why. I’d never heard of “ALBI” and wasn’t sure of “SVU”, so I spent rather a lot of time looking for alternative fills in that neighborhood.

      Newsday: 8:18, no errors. WSJ: 17:38, no errors. Jones: 10:34, no errors. Don’t remember much about them.

      BEQ: 23:31/32:38, no errors. The first time given is when I filled in the last two squares (the first two letters of 30A) … but … I had reservations about those two letters, so I walked away and did other things for a few minutes … and the second time given is when I came back, corrected those letters, and declared myself done. A difficult puzzle (in spite of BEQ’s rating), with a really obscure regional reference (21D, the clue for which is also missing some capitalization). Cute gimmick, though … 😜

    3. Googled for ALBI, MOL and TED. Couldn’t get THE ITALIAN ALPS. I had ITALIAN ALPS and couldn’t figure what the first 3 letters were until I had the perps. I think the THE part is lame. Sorry, Wechsler.

      Had jAM UP before DAM UP. Couldn’t figure out the theme. Got me there, and properly, Wechsler. Wechseln means to change, auf Deutsch. That’ll help everyone to remember it (ha)! Gewalt could mean “Force” – however, it’s Yiddish and might mean something a bit different, like “Woe is me.”

    4. LAT: 8:49, no errors. WSJ: DNF, 61 minutes, 6 errors, about 75% done. Finished pretty readily once I got those errors corrected. BEQ: 43 minutes, no errors. Pretty easy except for a couple of hard corners.

    5. Enjoyable puzzle today. All clues were reasonably solvable.
      This gave me the sense of assurance I am still capable of chewing
      gum and walking simultaneously.

    6. I am glad some people found it easy. The wife and I had a total of 21
      errors + omissions in our usual hour of time. Considered 89% successful.
      Some of the clues were just impossible to reason out or know. Tried hard.

    7. After I got the theme I was able to fix 48 Across since I now saw Aruba was needed. I would call this moderately hard for a Thursday. On the other hand I found the WSJ very difficult. I fought the upper left hand corner and then I fought even harder with the upper right hand corner.

      Finally worked them both out but it took a lot of black ink overs to get it done and still have it be semi legible. Getting the theme suddenly also saved my bacon as for the longest time I was lost in the ozone with this grid.

    8. I had a tough time with this puzzle and could not finish the last two of three clues in the lower left hand corner …… LAVISH, BRUSHY AND SVU ,,,,, also never heard of Carmina Burana – sounds like an african name like Burkina Faso …. hmmm

      I had faintly heard of Oy Gevalt – mainly the Oy ! ( alas ! woe is me ??)

      Anyway the puzzle is over , and we move on….

      I had thought that LANAI was a Hawaiian verandah or a porch that encircles the hawaiian house …. but now, its an island as well. Larry Ellison is welcome to keep and hold on to his own island…. Just don’t come running back to Uncle Sam when the japanese attack it …..

      Have a nice day, folks.

    9. 20:39. I got the theme before I got to the reveal. I noticed the backwards islands. I had to overcome a few missteps like realizing Hellen Keller isn’t on the FLA quarter when I saw OY GEVfLT didn’t seem right.

      Nice puzzle from J Wechsler as usual……especially one that mentions a TEQUILA BOTTLE. Lots of Wechsleric type clues in this one.

      Best –

    10. Thought it was going to be tough, but it came together pretty quickly, if, in a pretty round-about way. Had to do it on-line and it took 22 something with two errors – red letters in the NW corner.

      Kept trying to fit Tyrolean Alps, or some variation, into ITALIAN ALPS, since I got alps pretty quickly. re OY…something, the only thing I knew is ‘oy vey’, so had to rely on crosses and they were obscure too, like evite.

      re Moot – I agree, that this is confusing; learned about this some 10 years ago, and just filed it away as a peculiarity of the English language.

    11. Hey y’all!!🙄
      DAM!! I can say that in this context….One error: I had JAM UP and didn’t catch it…. 😞 altho maybe I wouldn’t have anyway. I’ve heard the name DENEB but don’t have it on the tip of my tongue.

      Didn’t know CARMINA BURANA but now i have to go to YouTube and hear that one part Bill mentions… from Right Guard and Gatorade ads!!😀

      Be well ~~🐕🐕🐈🐈🐈

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