LA Times Crossword 2 Sep 18, Sunday

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Constructed by: C.C. Burnikel
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Division of Labor

Today’s grid includes sets of circled letters that spell out jobs (LABOR). The names of each of those 6-letter jobs are DIVIDED by a black square. The jobs are:

  • LAW-YER
  • BRO-KER
  • RAN-GER
  • BUT-LER
  • AUT-HOR
  • BAR-BER

Bill’s time: 19m 04s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Numbers on letters : ZIP CODE

ZIP codes were introduced in 1963. The acronym “ZIP” stands for “Zone Improvement Plan”, a name indicating that mail travels more efficiently when the codes are included in the postal address.

8. Pester constantly : BADGER

To badger is to harass. The verb “to badger” comes from the cruel practice of badger-baiting, which dates back to medieval times. Badger-baiting is a blood sport in which a dog is used as bait for a badger in its den, to draw it out into the open. The den is an artificial structure built to resemble a natural badgers’ den, complete with a tunnel entrance. The dog is sent down the tunnel causing the badger and dog to lock their jaws on each other. The badger and dog are then removed from the den by pulling on the dog’s tale. Horrible …

19. Facetious local subject in many articles in “The Onion” : AREA MAN

“Area Man” is a persona used by the satirical newspaper “The Onion” in articles that are written in the style of local news. “Area Man” is a generic individual, like Bay Area man, Dallas man, Peoria man, etc.

“The Onion” is a satirical news network, with a print newspaper and a heavy online presence. “The Onion” newspaper was founded by two college students at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1988. The founders sold the operation a year later for about $20,000. The paper grew steadily until 1996 when it began to publish online and really took off. I think it’s worth a tad more than $20,000 today …

24. Seuss’ turtle king : YERTLE

“Yertle the Turtle” is a story by Dr. Seuss. The book is noted for the inclusion of the word “burp”. Back in 1958 when it was published, “burp” was considered to be vulgar. But, no one seemed to mind!

26. Heart charts, for short : ECGS

An EKG measures electrical activity in the heart. Back in my homeland of Ireland, an EKG is known as an ECG (for electrocardiogram). We use the German name in the US, Elektrokardiogramm, giving us EKG. Apparently the abbreviation EKG is preferred as ECG might be confused (if poorly handwritten, I guess) with EEG, the abbreviation for an electroencephalogram.

29. Monopoly maker : HASBRO

The Hasbro toy company was founded in 1923, to sell textile remnants. The founders were Herman, Hillel and Henry Hassenfeld, three brothers and hence the name “Hasbro”. The company diversified into toys in the early forties, with the first real market success being Mr. Potato Head.

The commercial game of Monopoly is supposedly a remake of “The Landlord’s Game” created in 1903 by a Quaker woman called Lizzie Phillips. Phillips used her game as a tool to explain the single tax theory of American economist Henry George. The Landlord’s Game was first produced commercially in 1924. The incredibly successful derivative game called Monopoly was introduced in 1933 by Charles Darrow, who became a very rich man when Parker Brothers bought the rights to the game just two years later in 1935.

32. “Bein’ Green” singer : KERMIT THE FROG

“Bein’ Green” is the signature song of Kermit the Frog, Jim Henson’s puppet character that appeared on “Sesame Street” and “The Muppet Show”. The song is also known by first line “It’s not easy bein’ green”.

37. Jewish Community Center component gp. : YMHA

The Young Men’s Hebrew Association (YMHA) and Young Women’s Hebrew Association (YWHA) provide assistance for Jewish immigrants.

38. “Back in the __” : USSR

By the time the Beatles recorded “Back in the U.S.S.R”, they were having a lot of problems working with each other. The song was recorded in 1968, with the band formally dissolving in 1970. Tensions were so great during the recording of “Back in the U.S.S.R” that Ringo Starr actually stormed out saying that he had quit, and the remaining three Beatles made the record without Ringo. Drums were played mainly by Paul McCartney, but there are also drum tracks on the final cut by both George Harrison and John Lennon. Interesting, huh?

41. Lake near the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame : ERIE

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame can be visited on the shores of Lake Erie in Cleveland, Ohio. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation was created in 1983 and started inducting artists in 1986. The Foundation didn’t get a home until the museum was dedicated in Cleveland in 1995. I had the great privilege of visiting the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame relatively recently, and really enjoyed myself. The magnificent building was designed by famed architect I. M. Pei.

42. Symbol of simplicity : PIE

The idiom “as easy as pie” is used to describe something that is simple to do. It appears that the reference here is to the simplicity of eating pie, rather than making a pie.

43. Canonized Mlle. : STE

“Sainte” (ste.) is French for “saint”, when referring to a “femme” (woman).

The act of creating a saint is known as “canonization”. The term derives from the process of placing someone in the canon (or “calendar”) of saints.

44. Tehran-based carrier : IRAN AIR

Iran Air was founded in 1944 as Iranian Airways Company, and so is the oldest airline operating today in the Middle East.

51. Long-necked wader : EGRET

Egrets are a group of several species of white herons. Many egret species were faced with extinction in the 1800s and early 1900s due to plume hunting, a practice driven by the demand for egret plumes that could be incorporated into hats.

53. Samurai lacking a master : RONIN

In feudal Japan, a samurai who lost his master, perhaps through death or loss of favor, was known as a ronin. The term “ronin” is also used in contemporary Japan for a salaried worker between jobs.

55. Actress Joanne : DRU

Joanne Dru’s most famous roles were in the movies “Red River” and “All the King’s Men”. She had a celebrity younger brother Peter Marshall, who was the original host of “Hollywood Squares”.

56. Stratford’s river : AVON

There are actually four rivers called the Avon in England, but “Shakespeare’s Avon” lies mainly in Warwickshire. The name “Avon” comes from the Old English word for a river, “abona”. Stratford-upon-Avon was the birthplace of William Shakespeare.

57. Post production? : RAISIN BRAN

C. W. Post decided to get into the cereal business after visiting the Battle Creek Sanitarium operated by John Harvey Kellogg. Post was interested in the chemistry of digestion and was inspired by the dietary products offered by Kellogg at his sanitarium. The first breakfast cereal Post introduced was Grape-Nuts, way back in 1897.

59. Logo modeled for five-month-old Ann Turner Cook : GERBER BABY

The Gerber Baby is a famous baby food logo that was introduced in 1928. The manufacturer of Gerber baby foods held a contest in the summer of that year to find a suitable baby face for a planned campaign. The winning entry was an unfinished charcoal drawing by Dorothy Hope Smith of Westport, Connecticut. Her model was Ann Turner Cook, who was a baby of the artist’s neighbor. Young Ann grew up to be a teacher cum mystery novelist.

63. Bus. school test : GMAT

If you want to get into a business school’s graduate program then you might have to take the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), which will cost you about $250, I believe …

66. Org. in “Traffic” : DEA

The 2000 film “Traffic” explores the illegal drug trade. The movie is adapted from a 1989 British TV miniseries called “Traffik”. There was a lso 2004 American TV miniseries produced called “Traffic”, which was based on both the prior TV show and the movie.

69. It burns in December : YULE LOG

A Yule log is a large log made from a very hard wood that is burned as part of the Christmas celebration. There is also a cake called a Yule log that is served at Christmas, especially in French-speaking parts of the world. The cake is made from sponge that is rolled up to resemble a wooden Yule log.

74. Oktoberfest drink : ALE

Oktoberfest is a 16-day beer festival in Munich that actually starts in September. About six million people attend every year, making it the largest fair in the world. I’ve been there twice, and it really is a great party …

75. “Ben-Hur” novelist Wallace : LEW

Lew Wallace was a general for the Union Army during the Civil War, and was also an author. He wrote a very successful and celebrated book called “Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ”, first published in 1880, which was made into a 1959 movie starring Charlton Heston.

77. Alien-seeking gp. : SETI

“SETI” is the name given to a number of projects that are searching for extraterrestrial life. The acronym stands for “search for extraterrestrial intelligence”. One of the main SETI activities is the monitoring of electromagnetic radiation (such as radio waves) reaching the Earth in the hope of finding a transmission from a civilization in another world.

78. First president with a Twitter account : OBAMA

President Barack Obama was the first US president to use a Twitter account. The president sent his first tweet from the newly created @POTUS account on May 18, 2015. That first message was a somewhat humorous reply to an earlier tweet from President Bill Clinton (@billclinton).

83. Jim Croce title guy : LEROY BROWN

“Bad, Bad Leroy Brown” is a song written and first performed by Jim Croce. It was a number-one hit for him in 1973. The song was inspired by a real-life Leroy Brown, who was someone that Croce met while serving in the US Army.

89. Berne’s river : AAR

The Aar (also called the “Aare” in German) is the longest river entirely in Switzerland. The Aar is a major tributary of the Rhine and flows through Bern, the nation’s capital.

94. Like many family-owned companies : NEPOTIC

Nepotism is the practice of giving relatives preferential treatment. The term originated during the Middle Ages with favoritism shown by Roman Catholic bishops and popes. The ministers of the church had taken vows of chastity, and some gave prefered positions to their nephews, as they didn’t have sons of their own to favor. The term “nepotism” derives from the Latin “nepos” meaning “nephew”.

96. RNs’ workplaces : ERS

One might find a registered nurse (RN) or a medical doctor (MD) in an emergency room (ER).

98. Med. care provider : HMO

Health Maintenance Organization (HMO)

99. Mazar of “Entourage” : DEBI

Debi Mazar plays Shauna Roberts on the HBO series “Entourage”. You might have seen her on “Dancing with the Stars” a few years back, although she didn’t do so well and was eliminated in the third week.

101. MLB’s steroid __ : ERA

Steroids are found commonly in nature, with familiar examples being cholesterol and testosterone. The controversial class of drugs called anabolic steroids (known informally as “roids” or simply “steroids”) are artificially produced chemicals designed to mimic the effect of the male sex hormone, testosterone. They are termed “anabolic” as they build up cellular tissue (particularly muscle) in a process called anabolism. Taking anabolic steroids can be termed “juicing”, and the aggressive behavior that can be a side-effect is known as “roid rage”.

104. Deck furniture wood : TEAK

Teak is a hardwood tree in the mint family, commonly found in monsoon forests of Asia. Teak’s tight grain and high oil content make it very suitable for constructing outdoor furniture, where weather resistance is valued. For the same reason, teak is the wood of choice for wooden decks on boats.

105. Successor to Canada’s Stephen Harper : JUSTIN TRUDEAU

Justin Trudeau ascended to the leadership of Canada’s Liberal Party in 2013, He led the Liberals to a decisive victory in the federal election of 2015, after which he assumed the office of Prime Minister of Canada. Justin is the eldest son of former Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, who led Canada for 15 years starting in 1968.

113. CVS rival : RITE AID

What we know today as Rite Aid started out as one store in Scranton, Pennsylvania in 1962. Rite Aid is now the biggest chain of drugstores on the East Coast of the United States and has operations all over the country.

115. Weather map line : ISOBAR

An isobar is a line on a weather map connecting points of equal barometric pressure.

117. Tea-flavoring citrus fruit : BERGAMOT ORANGE

The Earl Grey blend of tea is supposedly named after Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey who was Prime Minister of the UK from 1830 to 1834. Earl Grey tea has a distinctive flavor that is largely due to the addition of oil from the rind of the bergamot orange.

124. Lassie, for one : COLLIE

The canine character Lassie is the creation of Eric Knight, who wrote a short story that he expanded into a novel called “Lassie Come Home” published in 1940. “Lassie Come Home” was turned into a movie three years later, the first of a very successful franchise. The original Lassie (a female) was played by a dog called Pal, a male dog. In fact, all of the dogs that played Lassie over the years were males, because they looked better on camera, retaining a thick coat even during the summer months.

127. Composer Bruckner : ANTON

Anton Bruckner was an Austrian composer. He’s no favorite of mine as he embraces the use of dissonances (I’m a sober traditionalist!). Bruckner’s “Symphony No. 7” is perhaps his most popular work. He created a slow and mournful movement for the work in recognition of the impending death of Richard Wagner, whom he greatly admired.

Down

1. Efron of “Baywatch” (2017) : ZAC

Zac Efron is an actor from San Luis Obispo, California. Apparently Efron is a heartthrob to “tweenyboppers”. His big break came with the hit Disney movie “High School Musical”.

“Baywatch” is a 2017 comedy film that is based on the TV series of the same name that famously starred David Hasselhoff. The movie stars Dwayne “the Rock” Johnson.

2. Tax-deferred acct. : IRA

Individual retirement account (IRA)

3. __ Wee Reese : PEE

Pee Wee Reese was a shortstop who played his professional career with the Brooklyn and LA Dodgers. Reese is remembered not only for his skill on the field, but for his very visible support for teammate Jackie Robinson, who famously struggled to be accepted as the first African American player in the majors. As he was an outstanding marbles player as a child, Reese was given the nickname “pee wee” after the name for a small marble.

4. Winter melon : CASABA

A casaba is type of honeydew melon. The casaba takes its name from the Turkish city of Kasaba, from where the fruit was imported into America in the late 1800s.

5. Sydney of astrology : OMARR

Sydney Omarr was an astrology consultant to the rich and famous, and author of a horoscope column that appeared in the Los Angeles Times. While Omarr (real name Sidney Kimmelman) was in the US Army he even wrote a horoscope column for “Stars and Stripes”. He claimed that he got the job of writing for “Stars and Stripes” after having giving a consultation to President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

7. Env. add-ins : ENCS

An envelope (env.) might include an enclosure (enc.).

9. “Doe, __ … ” : A DEER

Doe, a deer, a female deer
Ray, a drop of golden sun
Me, a name I call myself
Far, a long, long way to run
Sew, a needle pulling thread
La, a note to follow Sew
Tea, a drink with jam and bread
That will bring us back to Do

10. “House” figs. : DRS

I think that “House” is one of the better shows made by Fox television. It is fun for me to see English actor Hugh Laurie in the title role as coming from the other side of the Atlantic I have been watching him in various comedic roles for decades. Famously he played Bertie Wooster opposite Stephen Fry in P.G. Wodehouse’s “Jeeves & Wooster”, as well as one of the bumbling “bad guys” in “101 Dalmatians” (the version starring Glenn Close).

12. Uber approx. : ETA

Estimated time of arrival (ETA)

13. Drop more Visine in, say : REWET

Visine is a brand of eye drops made by Johnson & Johnson, advertised to “get the red out”. The red in the eye is reduced because Visine contains tetrahydrozoline hydrochloride, a vasoconstrictor. The blood vessels creating the redness constrict when Visine is applied, and you “get the red out” as the blood is “squeezed” away from the surface of the eye.

15. Jaguar, e.g. : CAR

Auto manufacturer Jaguar started out as a manufacturer of sidecars for motorcycles back in 1922, when the company was known as the Swallow Sidecar Company (SS for short). The company changed its name to Jaguar after WWII, because of the unfortunate connotations of the letters “SS” in that era (i.e. the Nazi paramilitary organization).

16. Bug B Gon maker : ORTHO

Ortho is a brand of weed killer owned by Scotts Miracle-Gro.

17. Pequod co-owner : PELEG

The Pequod is the ship that figures in Herman Melville’s classic novel “Moby Dick”. The ship is owned by a consortium of the citizens of Nantucket Island, including Captains Ahab, Bildad and Peleg.

18. Home of the first family : EDEN

According to the Book of Genesis, Adam and Eve lived in a garden “in” Eden, with Eden being geographically located by reference to four rivers including the Tigris and the Euphrates. Some scholars hypothesize that Eden was located in Mesopotamia, which encompasses much of modern-day Iraq.

21. “Burning bright” poem critter : TYGER

William Blake was an English poet and artist who is considered now to have been a powerful force in his field during the Romantic Age. One of Blake’s more famous poems is “The Tyger”, which has the celebrated lines:

Tyger! Tyger! burning bright
In the forests of the night,
What immortal hand or eye
Could frame thy fearful symmetry?

23. State trees of six U.S. states : OAKS

The oak is the state tree of several US states:

  • Oak tree: Iowa
  • Northern red oak: New Jersey
  • White oak: Connecticut, Illinois and Maryland
  • Live oak: Georgia

27. Rosy-cheeked angels : CHERUBS

A cherub (plural “cherubim”) is an angel. The term “cherub” ultimately comes from the Hebrew “kerubh” (plural “kerubhim”) meaning “winged angel”.

31. Sci-fi author __ S. Tepper : SHERI

Sheri S. Tepper was an author who is best known for writing feminist science fiction. Tepper’s most successful novels are “The True Game” series of three related trilogies.

34. Actor McKellen : IAN

Sir Ian McKellen is a marvelous English actor, and someone who is comfortable playing anything from Macbeth on stage to Magneto in an “X-Men” movie. On the big screen, McKellen is very famous for playing Gandalf in “The Lord of Rings”. In the UK, Sir Ian is noted for being at the forefront of the campaign for equal rights for gay people, a role he has enthusiastically embraced since the eighties.

36. P.T. program : REHAB

Physical therapy (PT)

39. __-Croatian language : SERBO

The language known as Serbo-Croatian is the primary language spoken in Serbia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Montenegro.

46. Discount tag abbr. : IRR

Irregular (“irr.” or “irreg.”)

50. Singer from County Donegal : ENYA

Enya’s real name is Eithne Ní Bhraonáin, which can translate from Irish into Enya Brennan. Her Donegal family (in the northwest of Ireland) formed a band called Clannad, which included Enya. In 1980 Enya launched her very successful solo career, eventually becoming Ireland’s best-selling solo musician. And, she sure does turn up a lot in crosswords!

Donegal is the name of the most northerly county in Ireland, and is also the name of the town that gave the county its name. “Donegal” is the anglicized form of the Irish “Dún na nGall” meaning “fort of the foreigners”. County Donegal is a really beautiful part of the country …

52. She, in Sicily : ESSA

In the Italian Peninsula in Southern Europe, the “boot” is the mainland of Italy, and the the ball being kicked by the boot is the island of Sicily.

54. Air France hub : ORLY

Orly is a town on the outskirts of Paris to the south of the city. It is home to the Paris-Orly Airport, the second busiest international airport for the city after the more recently built Charles de Gaulle Airport. That said, Orly is home to more domestic flights than Charles de Gaulle.

Air France is my favorite airline (okay … after Aer Lingus, the Irish airline). I used to fly Air France a lot (I lived in France for a while), but haven’t done so since the company merged with KLM in 2004. Back in 2008, Air France-KLM was the world’s largest airline in terms of revenue.

59. Name on Pisa’s airport : GALILEI

Italy’s Pisa Airport is also known as Galileo Galilei Airport. It is the busiest airport in Tuscany, and is named for Pisa’s most famous son, polymath Galileo Galilei.

60. Hall of Fame Bronco : ELWAY

Former quarterback John Elway played his entire professional football career with the Denver Broncos. Elway was the oldest player ever to be named MVP in a Super Bowl game, being so honored in Super Bowl XXXIII in the 1998 season after the Bronco’s victory over the Atlanta Falcons.

61. Floor-cleaning robots : ROOMBAS

The Roomba vacuum cleaner is a cool-looking device that navigates its way around a room by itself, picking up dirt as it goes. Like I said, it’s cool-looking but I am not sure how effective it is …

67. Regional plant life : FLORA

The fauna is the animal life of a particular region, and the flora is that region’s plant life. The term “fauna” comes from the Roman goddess of earth and fertility who was called Fauna. Flora was the Roman goddess of plants, flowers and fertility.

70. Power grabber : USURPER

To usurp is to seize and hold by force. The term “usurp” comes to us from Latin via French, from “usus” (a use) and “rapere” (to seize).

74. Concert array : AMPS

An electric guitar, for example, needs an amplifier (amp) to take the weak signal created by the vibration of the strings and turn it into a signal powerful enough for a loudspeaker.

82. Main squeeze, slangily : BAE

“Bae” is a contemporary term of endearment. It is a pet name that is an abbreviation of “babe, baby”.

86. Many a NOW co-founder : WOMAN

The National Organization for Women (NOW) was founded in 1966. The NOW bylaws include a Statement of Purpose:

NOW’s purpose is to take action through intersectional grassroots activism to promote feminist ideals, lead societal change, eliminate discrimination, and achieve and protect the equal rights of all women and girls in all aspects of social, political, and economic life.

90. Dutch burg : STAD

“Stad” is both the Dutch and the Boer word for “city”.

“Burg” is an informal term used in the US for a smaller town that comes from the German word “burg” meaning “fortified city”.

95. Tulsa sch. with a Prayer Tower : ORU

Oral Roberts University (ORU) is a private school in Tulsa, Oklahoma. ORU was founded relatively recently, in 1963 by the late televangelist Oral Roberts. The campus includes a Prayer Tower at its center, a spectacular glass and steel structure designed by architect Frank Wallace. The tower includes an observation deck, and is a popular tourist attraction. The school’s sports teams are known as the Oral Roberts Golden Eagles.

97. “R.I.P.” singer : RITA ORA

Rita Ora is a British singer who was born in Pristina, Yugoslavia. She was born “Rita Sahatçiu” to Albanian parents. The family name “Sahatçiu” comes from a Turkish word meaning “watchmaker”. Rita’s parents changed their name to make it easier to pronounce. So, they moved from “watchmaker” to “Ora”, the Albanian word for “time”.

100. Deep Pore Charcoal Cleanser brand : BIORE

Biore is a skincare brand owned by the Kao Corporation of Tokyo.

105. Alexander of “Seinfeld” : JASON

In “Seinfeld”, Jerry’s friend George was the son of Frank and Estelle Costanza. George was portrayed by Jason Alexander, and the character was loosely based on the show’s co-creator Larry David. The character’s name came from Jerry Seinfeld’s real-life friend Mike Costanza. George’s parents were played by the great Jerry Stiller and Estelle Harris.

107. Actor Maguire : TOBEY

Actor Tobey Maguire is most associated with the role of Spider-Man these days. I’m not much into comic book hero films, but I do kind of enjoy the understated way that Maguire takes on “Spidey”. Maguire has appeared in other hit films, like “Pleasantville” (1998), “The Cider House Rules” (1999) and “Seabiscuit” (2003). Off the screen, he is big into poker and it’s said that he has won over $10 million playing poker in Hollywood. Apparently, the rather unsavory character “Player X” in the 2017 movie “Molly Bloom” was largely inspired by Maguire.

110. Walker on a bottle : HIRAM

Hiram Walker founded his distillery in Windsor, Ontario in 1858. Walker’s most successful brand was Canadian Club Whisky.

111. Pay stub abbr. : FICA

The Federal Insurance Contributions Act tax (FICA) was introduced in the 1930s as part of President Roosevelt’s New Deal. FICA payments are made by both employees and employers in order to fund Social Security and Medicare.

114. Eddie Redmayne’s alma mater : ETON

English actor Eddie Redmayne played mainly supporting roles, such as Marius Pontmercy in 2012’s “Les Misérables”, until he wowed the world portraying Stephen Hawking in “The Theory of Everything”. A few years later, Redmayne played Lili Elbe in “The Danish Girl”, and then Newt Scamander in the Harry Potter spinoff “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them”.

116. Rain-__ bubble gum : BLO

Rain-Blo bubble gum balls were introduced in 1940 by Leaf Confectionary, a company that was then based in the Netherlands.

118. “Strange Magic” band : ELO

The Electric Light Orchestra (ELO) is a symphonic rock group from the north of England.

120. Mailing ctr. : GPO

General Post Office (GPO)

123. Coll. major : ENG

English (Eng.)

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Numbers on letters : ZIP CODE
8. Pester constantly : BADGER
14. Range : SCOPE
19. Facetious local subject in many articles in “The Onion” : AREA MAN
20. Classified stat : AD RATE
21. Got misty-eyed, with “up” : TEARED
22. Picnic side with Parmesan dressing : CAESAR COLESLAW
24. Seuss’ turtle king : YERTLE
25. Place to check for prints : ART SALE
26. Heart charts, for short : ECGS
28. Chick magnet? : HEN
29. Monopoly maker : HASBRO
32. “Bein’ Green” singer : KERMIT THE FROG
37. Jewish Community Center component gp. : YMHA
38. “Back in the __” : USSR
40. Place for a stud : EAR
41. Lake near the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame : ERIE
42. Symbol of simplicity : PIE
43. Canonized Mlle. : STE
44. Tehran-based carrier : IRAN AIR
47. ”Finished!” : THERE!
51. Long-necked wader : EGRET
53. Samurai lacking a master : RONIN
55. Actress Joanne : DRU
56. Stratford’s river : AVON
57. Post production? : RAISIN BRAN
59. Logo modeled for five-month-old Ann Turner Cook : GERBER BABY
62. Thread holder : SPOOL
63. Bus. school test : GMAT
65. Brief street sign : SLO
66. Org. in “Traffic” : DEA
67. Tent entrances : FLAPS
69. It burns in December : YULE LOG
72. Blew away : WOWED
74. Oktoberfest drink : ALE
75. “Ben-Hur” novelist Wallace : LEW
77. Alien-seeking gp. : SETI
78. First president with a Twitter account : OBAMA
80. Actress’ first film : MOVIE DEBUT
83. Jim Croce title guy : LEROY BROWN
88. Get ready : PREP
89. Berne’s river : AAR
90. Sch. health course : SEX-ED
91. Schoolyard comeback : AM TOO!
92. Place to make waves : SALON
94. Like many family-owned companies : NEPOTIC
96. RNs’ workplaces : ERS
98. Med. care provider : HMO
99. Mazar of “Entourage” : DEBI
101. MLB’s steroid __ : ERA
102. __-da: pretentious : LA-DI
104. Deck furniture wood : TEAK
105. Successor to Canada’s Stephen Harper : JUSTIN TRUDEAU
109. Bike trail hazards : THORNS
111. “Swell!” : FAB!
112. Full of energy : GO-GO
113. CVS rival : RITE AID
115. Weather map line : ISOBAR
117. Tea-flavoring citrus fruit : BERGAMOT ORANGE
124. Lassie, for one : COLLIE
125. Pass, as time : ELAPSE
126. Formal address : ORATION
127. Composer Bruckner : ANTON
128. Fluctuated wildly : YO-YOED
129. Handle holder : NAME TAG

Down

1. Efron of “Baywatch” (2017) : ZAC
2. Tax-deferred acct. : IRA
3. __ Wee Reese : PEE
4. Winter melon : CASABA
5. Sydney of astrology : OMARR
6. Dash from hiding : DART OUT
7. Env. add-ins : ENCS
8. One really on her toes : BALLERINA
9. “Doe, __ … ” : A DEER
10. “House” figs. : DRS
11. Hoedown honey : GAL
12. Uber approx. : ETA
13. Drop more Visine in, say : REWET
14. Deems appropriate : SEES FIT
15. Jaguar, e.g. : CAR
16. Bug B Gon maker : ORTHO
17. Pequod co-owner : PELEG
18. Home of the first family : EDEN
21. “Burning bright” poem critter : TYGER
23. State trees of six U.S. states : OAKS
27. Rosy-cheeked angels : CHERUBS
29. Overly energetic : HYPER
30. Felipe’s female friend : AMIGA
31. Sci-fi author __ S. Tepper : SHERI
33. Vicious : MEAN
34. Actor McKellen : IAN
35. Exchange (a player) with : TRADE TO
36. P.T. program : REHAB
39. __-Croatian language : SERBO
43. Paint with dots : STIPPLE
45. Curly lock : RINGLET
46. Discount tag abbr. : IRR
48. Sidestep : EVADE
49. Like trial judges : ROBED
50. Singer from County Donegal : ENYA
52. She, in Sicily : ESSA
54. Air France hub : ORLY
58. Word with hard or red : -NOSED
59. Name on Pisa’s airport : GALILEI
60. Hall of Fame Bronco : ELWAY
61. Floor-cleaning robots : ROOMBAS
64. Shook hands with, perhaps : MET
67. Regional plant life : FLORA
68. Be straight (with) : LEVEL
70. Power grabber : USURPER
71. Horror film feature, often : GORE
73. Friendly : WARM
74. Concert array : AMPS
76. Gradually withdrawing (from) : WEANING
79. Portended : BODED
81. Devices with earbuds : IPODS
82. Main squeeze, slangily : BAE
84. Cried out : EXCLAIMED
85. Significant person? : OTHER
86. Many a NOW co-founder : WOMAN
87. Secluded places : NOOKS
90. Dutch burg : STAD
93. Margin at the bottom : NET GAIN
95. Tulsa sch. with a Prayer Tower : ORU
97. “R.I.P.” singer : RITA ORA
100. Deep Pore Charcoal Cleanser brand : BIORE
103. Jaguar, e.g. : AUTO
104. Until now : TO DATE
105. Alexander of “Seinfeld” : JASON
106. Letter-shaped fastener : U-BOLT
107. Actor Maguire : TOBEY
108. Remove all traces of : ERASE
110. Walker on a bottle : HIRAM
111. Pay stub abbr. : FICA
114. Eddie Redmayne’s alma mater : ETON
116. Rain-__ bubble gum : BLO
118. “Strange Magic” band : ELO
119. Beam of light : RAY
120. Mailing ctr. : GPO
121. Minor gripe : NIT
122. __ long way : GO A
123. Coll. major : ENG

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