LA Times Crossword 17 Sep 18, Monday

Advertisement

Advertisement

[ad_below_grid]

Constructed by: Craig Stowe
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: Emmy

Themed answers comprise two words starting with the letters ME (which sounds like “Emmy”):

  • 72A. TV award, and a homophonic hint to the four longest puzzle answers : EMMY (sounds like “ME”)
  • 17A. Large-scale departure : MASS EXODUS
  • 26A. Cost of a car, in most family budgets : MAJOR EXPENSE
  • 49A. Edmund Hillary’s conquest : MOUNT EVEREST
  • 64A. Region including Egypt, Israel, etc. : MIDDLE EAST

Bill’s time: 4m 45s

Bill’s errors: 0

Advertisement

[ad_above_googlies]

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Potato chips source : SPUD

The word “spud” is used as a slang term for a potato and was first recorded in the mid-1800s, in New Zealand would you believe?

5. __ bean : LIMA

The lima bean is also known as the butter bean. The lima bean was introduced to Europe from the area around Lima, Peru, hence the name.

9. Rick’s “Casablanca” love : ILSA

The movie “Casablanca” was released in January of 1943, timed to coincide with the Casablanca Conference, the high-level meeting between Roosevelt and Churchill. The film wasn’t a box-office hit, but gained critical acclaim, winning three Oscars including Best Picture. The signature song “As Time Goes By” was written many years earlier for a 1931 Broadway musical called “Everybody’s Welcome”, and was a hit in 1931 for Rudy Vallee. But today we all remember the Casablanca version, sung by Dooley Wilson (who played “Sam” in the film). Poor Dooley didn’t get to record it as a single, due to a musician’s strike in 1943. The 1931 Rudy Vallee version was re-released that year and became an even bigger hit second time round.

14. Spring bloom : IRIS

Iris is a genus of flowering plants that come in a wide variety of flower colors. The term “iris” is a Greek word meaning “rainbow”. Many species of irises are called “flags”. One suggestion is that the alternate name comes from the Middle English “flagge” meaning “reed”. This term was used because iris leaves look like reeds.

15. Les __-Unis : ETATS

“Les États-Unis” is what French speakers call “the United States”.

16. Neighbor of Yemen : OMAN

Oman lies on the southeast coast of the Arabian Peninsula and is neighbored by the UAE, Saudi Arabia and Yemen. Oman is a monarchy, and the official name of the state is the Sultanate of Oman. All of the country’s legislative, executive and judiciary power resides with the hereditary sultan.

19. Island setting for Melville’s “Omoo” : TAHITI

Tahiti is the most populous island in French Polynesia, which is located in the central Southern Pacific. Although Captain Cook landed in Tahiti in 1769, he wasn’t the first European to do so. However, Cook’s visit was the most significant in that it heralded a whole spate of European visitors, who brought with them prostitution, venereal disease and alcohol. Included among the subsequent visitors was the famous HMS Bounty under the charge of Captain Bligh.

Herman Melville mined his own experiences when writing his novels. Melville sailed from New Bedford, Massachusetts in 1841 on a whaler heading into the Pacific Ocean (a source for “Moby-Dick”). Melville ended up deserting his ship 18 months later and lived with natives on a South Pacific Island for three weeks (a source for “Typee”). He picked up another whaler and headed for Hawaii, where he joined the crew of a US navy frigate that was bound for Boston (a source for “Omoo”).

21. Court order to testify : SUBPOENA

A subpoena is a writ issued by a court compelling a person to testify before the court, or compelling a person or organization to produce evidence before the court. The term comes from the Latin phrase “sub poena” meaning “under penalty”. The court has the authority to penalize a person or organization that does not comply with the subpoena.

31. 1860s White House nickname : ABE

Abraham Lincoln was the sixteenth President of the US. There are several stories told about how he earned the nickname “Honest Abe”. One story dates back to early in his career as a lawyer. Lincoln accidentally overcharged a client and then walked miles in order to right the wrong as soon as possible.

33. Traffic light color : YELLOW

The first traffic lights date back to 1868 when they were installed outside the Houses of Parliament in London. They resembled the signals already in use for trains, with semaphore arms and red and green gas lamps for nighttime use. That first system was operated manually, by a policeman at the base. Sadly, one police officer was killed, just one year after the light’s installation, when the gas system exploded.

42. American flag feature : STRIPE

Legend has it that Betsy Ross made the first American flag for General George Washington. However, this story only surfaced during the centennial celebrations of 1876, and although Betsy Ross was indeed one of several flag makers in Philadelphia in the days of George Washington, sadly there’s no definitive evidence that Ross provided that first Stars and Stripes.

48. Buddhist school : ZEN

Zen is a Buddhist school that developed its own tradition in China back in the 7th century AD. Zen is a Japanese spelling of the Chinese word “chan”, which in turn derives from the Sanskrit word “dhyana” meaning “meditation”.

49. Edmund Hillary’s conquest : MOUNT EVEREST

Mount Everest was first summited in 1953 by New Zealander Edmund Hillary and Nepalese sherpa Tenzing Norgay. Hillary and Norgay were part of an expedition from which two pairs of climbers were selected to make a summit attempt. The first pair were Tom Bourdillon and Charles Evans, and they came within 330 feet of their goal but had to turn back. The expedition sent up the second pair two days later, and history was made on 29 May 1953.

52. Fermented quaff : ALE

“Quaff” is both a verb and a noun. One “quaffs” (takes a hearty drink) of a “quaff” (a hearty drink).

55. Slugger’s stat : RBI

Run batted in (RBI)

60. 1971 New York prison riot site : ATTICA

The Attica Correctional Facility in Attica, New York is used to incarcerate the toughest of the state’s convicts. Famous people who have spent time in Attica include David Berkowitz (Son of Sam) and Mark David Chapman (who killed John Lennon). Attica was the site of a famous riot in 1971 involving almost 1,000 inmates. Control of the prison was restored by the authorities after several days of unrest that left 39 people dead, including ten guards and other prison employees.

64. Region including Egypt, Israel, etc. : MIDDLE EAST

In geographical terms there are three “Easts”. “Near East” and “Middle East” are terms that are often considered synonymous, although “Near East” tends to be used when discussing ancient history and “Middle East” when referring to the present day. The Near/Middle East encompasses most of Western Asia and Egypt. The term “Far East” describes East Asia (including the Russian Far East), Southeast Asia and South Asia.

67. Sad verse : ELEGY

Perhaps the most famous elegy in the English language is that written by Thomas Gray, completed in 1750. His “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard” is the source of many oft-quoted phrases, including:

  • Celestial fire
  • Far from the Madding Crowd
  • Kindred spirit

70. __ a one : NARY

The adjective “nary” means “not one”, as in “nary a soul”.

71. The “Y” in “YTD” : YEAR

Year-to-date (YTD)

72. TV award, and a homophonic hint to the four longest puzzle answers : EMMY

The Emmy Awards are the television equivalent of the Oscars from the world of film, the Grammy Awards in music and the Tony Awards for the stage. Emmy Awards are presented throughout the year, depending on the sector of television being honored. The most famous of these ceremonies are the Primetime Emmy Awards and the Daytime Emmy Awards. The distinctive name of “Emmy” is a softened version of the word “immy”, the nickname given to the video camera tubes found in old television cameras.

Down

1. Loch Ness local : SCOT

Loch Ness is one of the two most famous lakes in Scotland. Loch Ness is famous for its “monster”, and Loch Lomond is famous for the lovely song “The Bonnie Banks o’ Loch Lomond”. Oh, ye’ll tak’ the high road, and I’ll tak’ the low road …

2. Adidas rival : PUMA

Puma is a German company that sells athletic shoes worldwide. The company is most famous for its line of soccer boots.

3. Home of the NBA’s Jazz : UTAH

The Utah Jazz professional basketball team moved to their current home in Salt Lake City in 1979. As one might guess from the name, the team originated in New Orleans, but only played there for five seasons. New Orleans was a tough place to be based because venues were hard to come by, and Mardi Gras forced the team to play on the road for a whole month.

4. Robert of “Dirty Grandpa” : DE NIRO

“Dirty Grandpa” is a 2016 comedy about a lawyer (played by Zac Efron) who drives his army veteran grandfather (played by Robert De Niro) to Florida. The critics hated this one, and I’ve never seen it …

6. Nest egg acronym : IRA

Individual retirement account (IRA)

10. Stows cargo : LADES

The verb “to lade” meaning “to load” comes from an Old English word “hladan”. “Lade” also used to mean “draw water” and indeed gave us our word “ladle”. So “lade” and “ladle” are close cousins.

18. Traditional black piano key wood : EBONY

The traditional materials used for the manufacture of piano keys were ebony (black) and ivory (white). Ebony is still used, but now for both white and black keys. The white keys are made by covering ebony with white plastic.

20. Singer Amos : TORI

Tori Amos is an American pianist and singer. Amos started playing the piano at two years old, and was composing piano pieces by age five. She was playing in piano bars (chaperoned by her father) when she was 14. I’m going to have to find some of her music …

26. Big mouths : MAWS

“Maw” is a term used to describe the mouth or stomach of a carnivorous animal. “Maw” is also used as slang for the mouth or stomach of a greedy person.

27. Help rob the bank : ABET

The word “abet” comes into English from the Old French “abeter” meaning “to bait” or “to harass with dogs” (it literally means “to make bite”). This sense of encouraging something bad to happen morphed into our modern usage of “abet” meaning to aid or encourage someone in a crime.

28. Taunt from the bleachers : JEER

At a sports event one might sit in the bleachers. “Bleachers” is a particularly American term used to describe the tiered stands that provide seating for spectators. These seats were originally wooden planks, and as they were uncovered they would be bleached by the sun, giving them the name we use today. Sometimes the fans using the bleachers might be referred to as “bleacherites”.

29. Emulate Degas : PAINT

Edgar Degas was a French artist who was famous for both his paintings and his sculptures. Some of Degas’ most beautiful works feature female ballet dancers, and others depict women bathing.

30. “Slippery” tree : ELM

The slippery elm is a species of elm native to North America that is also known as the Red Elm. The inner bark of the slippery elm can used in a medicinal tea. Elm bark tea is said to ease a sore throat or irritated stomach.

35. Wordsworth works : ODES

The great English poet William Wordsworth is intrinsically linked with the Lake District in the north of England, where he lived from much of his life. The Lake District is a beautiful part of the country, and I’ve been fortunate enough to visit Dove Cottage in Grasmere a couple of times, where Wordsworth lived with his sister Dorothy …

44. Jazzman Blake : EUBIE

James Hubert “Eubie” Blake was a composer and pianist from Baltimore, Maryland. Blake was a noted composer and performer of ragtime music. The 1978 musical revue “Eubie!” features his music. Apparently Blake claimed to have started smoking cigarettes at the age of 10 years, and died 85 years later in 1983. Blake’s celebrity status and long life as a smoker was often cited by politicians who opposed anti-tobacco legislation.

50. Distance between bases, in feet : NINETY

That would be baseball.

53. Bizet opera priestess : LEILA

“The Pearl Fishers” (“Les Pêcheurs de Perles”) is the second most famous opera produced by Georges Bizet, the French composer from the Romantic era. “The Pearl Fishers” is about two Ceylon fishermen (Nadir and Zurga) who are lifelong friends, and the threats to that friendship when the pair fall in love with the same woman (Leila).

58. Avant-garde : EDGY

Someone or something described as avant-garde is especially innovative. “Avant-garde” is French for “advance guard”.

59. Motown’s Marvin : GAYE

Marvin Gaye was a singer-songwriter from Washington, D.C. who came to be known as “Prince of Soul” and “Prince of Motown”. Some of Gaye’s biggest hits are “I Heard It Through the Grapevine” (1968), “What’s Going On?” (1971), “Let’s Get It On” (1973) and “Sexual Healing” (1982). Famously, Gaye was shot dead by his father while Marvin was sitting on his mother’s bed just talking to her. Marvin had given the gun to his father as a Christmas gift.

62. Linguine seafood sauce morsel : CLAM

Linguine is a type of pasta that is similar to spaghetti, except that in cross-section linguine is elliptical whereas spaghetti is round. The correct name for the dish is “linguine” meaning “little tongues” in Italian. That said, the misspelling “linguini” is given in some dictionaries as an acceptable Americanized variant..

65. Daycation destination : SPA

“Daycation” is a term used to describe a day trip. A day trip is a visit taken to a place of relaxation or recreation, and returning home the same day.

Advertisement

[ad_below_googlies]

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Potato chips source : SPUD
5. __ bean : LIMA
9. Rick’s “Casablanca” love : ILSA
13. “Aww!” : CUTE!
14. Spring bloom : IRIS
15. Les __-Unis : ETATS
16. Neighbor of Yemen : OMAN
17. Large-scale departure : MASS EXODUS
19. Island setting for Melville’s “Omoo” : TAHITI
21. Court order to testify : SUBPOENA
22. Mindless memorization : ROTE
24. Farm sound : MOO
25. Blue expanse, on a clear day : SKY
26. Cost of a car, in most family budgets : MAJOR EXPENSE
31. 1860s White House nickname : ABE
32. Thought : IDEA
33. Traffic light color : YELLOW
37. Gardener’s bane : WEED
39. Quick taste : SIP
41. Produced : MADE
42. American flag feature : STRIPE
45. At hand : NEAR
48. Buddhist school : ZEN
49. Edmund Hillary’s conquest : MOUNT EVEREST
52. Fermented quaff : ALE
55. Slugger’s stat : RBI
56. Get up : RISE
57. Removing from the text : DELETING
60. 1971 New York prison riot site : ATTICA
64. Region including Egypt, Israel, etc. : MIDDLE EAST
66. “__ be fine”: “No prob” : IT’LL
67. Sad verse : ELEGY
68. Spell-checker discovery : TYPO
69. Not virtual : REAL
70. __ a one : NARY
71. The “Y” in “YTD” : YEAR
72. TV award, and a homophonic hint to the four longest puzzle answers : EMMY

Down

1. Loch Ness local : SCOT
2. Adidas rival : PUMA
3. Home of the NBA’s Jazz : UTAH
4. Robert of “Dirty Grandpa” : DE NIRO
5. Restricted in number, as an edition : LIMITED
6. Nest egg acronym : IRA
7. Hit’s opposite : MISS
8. Take for granted : ASSUME
9. “Was __ hard on you?” : I TOO
10. Stows cargo : LADES
11. Caused some nose-pinching : STUNK
12. Evaluate, as metal : ASSAY
15. Bring to light : EXPOSE
18. Traditional black piano key wood : EBONY
20. Singer Amos : TORI
23. Old flames : EXES
26. Big mouths : MAWS
27. Help rob the bank : ABET
28. Taunt from the bleachers : JEER
29. Emulate Degas : PAINT
30. “Slippery” tree : ELM
34. Do nothing : LAZE
35. Wordsworth works : ODES
36. Attended, with “to” : WENT
38. Reduce in brightness : DIM
40. __ pressure : PEER
43. Rotund : PORTLY
44. Jazzman Blake : EUBIE
46. Pilot : AVIATOR
47. Take ten : REST
50. Distance between bases, in feet : NINETY
51. Go to bed : RETIRE
52. Commercial writers : ADMEN
53. Bizet opera priestess : LEILA
54. Tribal leader : ELDER
58. Avant-garde : EDGY
59. Motown’s Marvin : GAYE
61. Receipt detail : ITEM
62. Linguine seafood sauce morsel : CLAM
63. One on your side : ALLY
65. Daycation destination : SPA

Advertisement

[ad_below_clue_list]