LA Times Crossword 14 Oct 18, Sunday

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Constructed by: Paul Coulter
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: For Starters

Themed answers each comprise three words. Themed clues all read “Three types of ‘x’”, where ‘x’ is a three-letter word given by the first letters of the three words in the same answer. Clever!

  • 22A. Three types of (see circled letters) : MERCATOR AREA POLITICAL (Three types of MAP)
  • 32A. Three types of (see circled letters) : JUMBO EXECUTIVE TURBO (Three types of JET)
  • 50A. Three types of (see circled letters) : MINUTE ANCHOR NEWSPAPER (Three types of MAN)
  • 76A. Three types of (see circled letters) : CALICO ABYSSINIAN TABBY (Three types of CAT)
  • 90A. Three types of (see circled letters) : CITROEN ACURA RENAULT (Three types of CAR)
  • 108A. Three types of (see circled letters) : AVANTGARDE ROCOCO TRAMP (Three types of ART)

Bill’s time: 16m 48s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Eponymous Chanel perfume : COCO

The House of Chanel has its origin in a millinery shop in Paris that Gabrielle “CoCo” Chanel opened in 1909. The shop was in the ground floor of the home of socialite Étienne Balsan, of whom Chanel was his mistress. Using her connection to Balsan, Chanel met many women who lived extravagant lifestyles in Paris in those pre-war year, and hence was able to establish her reputation as a hatmaker. Chanel built on that reputation, and within a few years opened her first dress shop in Paris.

18. Banned fruit spray : ALAR

The chemical name for Alar, a plant growth regulator and color enhancer, is daminozide. Alar was primarily used on apples but was withdrawn from the market when it was linked to cancer.

19. Gladiator’s realm : ARENA

The term “gladiator” means “swordsman”, and comes from “gladius”, the Latin word for “sword”.

20. Pull-up beneficiaries : LATS

The muscles known as the “lats” are the latissimi dorsi, the broadest muscles in the back. “Latissimus” is the Latin for “broadest” and “dorsum” is Latin for “back”.

22. Three types of (see circled letters) : MERCATOR AREA POLITICAL (Three types of MAP)

A Mercator projection is a type of map, one named for Flemish cartographer Gerardus Mercator. The map distorts reality in that line of longitude are parallel to each, rather than meeting at the north and south poles. The resulting effect is that land masses are distorted in size, with more and more distortion taking place moving away from the equator and towards the poles.

26. Naturally lit room : SOLARIUM

A solarium (plural “solaria”) is a sunroom or sun lounge, a structure usually built onto the side of a house that contains a lot of glass to let in the sun.

27. “500” initials : S AND P

Standard & Poor’s (S&P) is a financial services company, famous for its stock market indices, especially the S&P 500. The company also publishes credit ratings for sovereign governments, and in 2011 famously lowered the rating of the US federal government from AAA to to AA+.

28. Stick in one’s craw : RANKLE

“Craw” is another name for “crop”, a portion of the alimentary tract of some animals, including birds. The crop is used for the storage of food prior to digestion. It allows the animal to eat large amounts and then digest that food with efficiency over an extended period. The expression “to stick in one’s craw” is used one when one cannot accept something, cannot “swallow” it.

29. Q and A part: Abbr. : ANS

Question and answer (Q&A)

32. Three types of (see circled letters) : JUMBO EXECUTIVE TURBO (Three types of JET)

The first jet to be called a “Jumbo” was Boeing’s 747, as it was the first wide-body airliner. A wide-body passenger aircraft has seating laid out with two aisles running the length of the plane. The 747 also has three decks for part of its length, with the lower deck being used for cargo and galley space, and the upper deck for extra passenger seating. The Airbus A380 is called a “Superjumbo” as it has two full decks of passengers.

In a turbojet engine, it’s the expanding exhaust gases expelled from the rear of the engine that provide thrust. In a turboprop engine, on the other hand, the energy from the turbine energy is used to drive a propeller via a gearbox.

41. Gadget’s rank: Abbr. : INSP

“Inspector Gadget” is a cartoon television show from the 1980s in which the title character is a cyborg detective. There’s a lot of similarity in Inspector Gadget’s behavior to the behavior of Maxwell Smart from the sitcom “Get Smart”. Actor Don Adams played the title role in “Get Smart” and also provided the voice for Inspector Gadget.

42. Ann and May : CAPES

Cape Ann is located 30 miles north of Boston and is on the northernmost edge of Massachusetts Bay. The Cape was first mapped by the explorer John Smith. Early in his adventurous life Smith had been captured and enslaved by the Ottoman Empire. His “owner” in his days of slavery was a woman called Tragabigzanda, and apparently the slave and owner fell in love. Smith originally called Cape Tragabigzanda in her memory, but King Charles I changed the name to Cape Ann in honor of his own mother, Anne of Denmark.

Cape May is a peninsula and an island that forms the southern tip of New Jersey. The US Coast Guard basic training camp is located in Cape May.

43. Much of “Deck the Halls” : LAS

The music for the Christmas song “Deck the Halls” is a traditional Welsh tune that dates back to the 16th century. The same tune was used by Mozart for a violin and piano duet. The lyrics with which we are familiar (other than the “f-la-la”) are American in origin, and were recorded in 19th century.

“’Tis the season to be jolly, Fa la la la la la la la!”

46. Wharton postgrad awards : MBAS

Wharton is the business school of the University of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia. The school was established in 1881 largely due to a donation from industrialist Joseph Wharton, co-founder of Bethlehem Steel.

50. Three types of (see circled letters) : MINUTE ANCHOR NEWSPAPER (Three types of MAN)

Back in the colony of Massachusetts Bay, the local militia was made up of all the able-bodied males in the colony who were aged between 16 and 60. These men were called to service only when necessary. Some of the men in towns around the colony were trained for rapid deployment, and were known as “minute men”.

60. More than proper : PRISSY

The first known use of the word “prissy” in print, meaning “overly prim”, is in the 1895 children’s book “Mr. Rabbit at Home” by Joel Chandler Harris.

[“]Then Mrs Blue Hen rumpled up her feathers and got mad with herself, and went to setting. I reckon that’s what you call it. I’ve heard some call it ‘setting’ and others ‘sitting.’ Once, when I was courting, I spoke of a sitting hen, but the young lady said I was too prissy for anything.”
What is prissy? asked Sweetest Susan.
Mr. Rabbit shut his eyes and scratched his ear. Then he shook his head slowly.
It’s nothing but a girl’s word, remarked Mrs. Meadows by way of explanation. “It means that somebody’s trying hard to show off.”
I reckon that’s so, said Mr. Rabbit, opening his eyes. He appeared to be much relieved.

61. Electrolysis particle : ANION

Electrolysis is a chemical process that uses direct current passing through a solution to separate out individual chemicals in that solution. One chemical moves to the anode, and the other to the cathode.

63. [not my error] : SIC

[Sic] indicates that a quotation is written as originally found, perhaps including a typo. “Sic” is Latin for “thus, like this”. The term is more completely written as “sic erat scriptum”, which translates as “thus was it written”.

64. Solemn : STAID

Something described as staid is unwavering, fixed. This usage expanded to mean “sober, sedate”. The term dates back to the 16th century, and comes from verb “to stay”. “Staid” is a rewriting of the past participle “stayed”.

66. “__ in the Boy’s Room”: 1973-’74 hit : SMOKIN’

“Smokin’ in the Boys Room” is a song released by Brownsville Station in 1973. The title and lyrics refer to male students smoking cigarettes in the boys’ restroom at school.

76. Three types of (see circled letters) : CALICO ABYSSINIAN TABBY (Three types of CAT)

Domestic cats with a white coat and patches of brown and black are called calico cats in this country. Back in Ireland, and the rest of the world I think, such cats are called tortoiseshell-and-white. “Calico” is not a breed of cat, but rather a coloring.

The Abyssinian is a popular short-haired breed of domestic cat. The name “Abyssinian” would seem to indicate that the breed originated in Ethiopia (formerly “Abyssinia”), but most stories suggest that the Abyssinian comes from Egypt.

Tabbies aren’t a breed of cat, but rather are cats with particular markings regardless of breed. Tabbies have coats with stripes, dots and swirling patterns, and usually an “M” mark on the forehead.

80. “Chestnuts roasting __ open fire” : ON AN

The Christmas classic known as “The Christmas Song”, which starts out with the line “Chestnuts roasting on an open fire”, was written in 1944 by Bob Wells and singer Mel Tormé. According to Tormé, the song was actually written on a very hot summer day, with Wells providing the lyrics. Apparently without the intention of writing a song, Wells jotted down four “Christmassy” phrases in an effort to “stay cool by thinking cool”. Those phrases were:

  • Chestnuts roasting
  • Jack Frost nipping
  • Yuletide carols
  • Folks dressed up like Eskimos

“The Christmas Song” is now the most-performed Christmas song in the world.

81. Supermodel Carangi : GIA

Gia Carangi was a fashion model, often described as the world’s first supermodel. Carangi was from Philadelphia, and had her first modelling jobs appearing in newspaper ads. She started to abuse heroin in 1980, at 20 years of age. She contracted AIDS, and died at 26 years old. Carangi was one of the first famous women to succumb to the disease, in 1986. HBO made a biopic about Carangi’s life called “Gia” in 1998. Angelina Jolie played the title role.

82. “Hamlet” quintet : ACTS

Shakespeare adopted the five-act structure for most of his plays, thereby using the same format that was used by Seneca for his Roman tragedies. Given five acts, the plays tend to unfold as follows:

  • Act I is used as an introduction
  • Act II is used to complicate things
  • Act III contains the climax of the tale
  • Act IV is used to add some suspense
  • Act V is the conclusion

84. Graphics file extension : TIF

The Tagged Image File Format (TIFF) is a computer file format used for images. TIFF images use the filename extensions “.tiff” and “.tif”.

85. “Let’s Make __” : A DEAL

The game show “Let’s Make a Deal” first aired way back in 1963. For many years the show was hosted by Monty Hall, from 1963 until 1986, and again briefly in 1991. In more recent years, Wayne Brady took over as host in 2009.

87. Hit the bottle : TOPE

To tope is to drink alcohol excessively and habitually.

89. History Muse : CLIO

In Greek mythology, the muses are the goddesses who inspire the creation of literature and the arts. The number of muses is a subject of debate at times, but the most popular view is that there are nine:

  • Calliope (epic poetry)
  • Clio (history)
  • Erato (lyric poetry)
  • Euterpe (music)
  • Melpomene (tragedy)
  • Polyhymnia (choral poetry)
  • Terpsichore (dance)
  • Thalia (comedy)
  • Urania (astronomy)

Before the adoption of the nine muses of Greek mythology, there were originally three muses, the three Boeotian Muses. These were:

  • Mneme (memory)
  • Melete (meditation)
  • Aoede (song)

90. Three types of (see circled letters) : CITROEN ACURA RENAULT (Three types of CAR)

André-Gustave Citroën was a Parisian industrialist who founded the Citroën automotive company in 1919, which became the fourth-largest manufacturer of automobiles by the 1930s. Citroën was also quite the gambler and his huge losses eventually led to his company going bankrupt and being taken over by Michelin, the enterprise that provided the tires for the Citroën cars.

Acura is the luxury brand of the Honda Motor Company. As an aside, Infiniti is the equivalent luxury brand for the Nissan Motor Company, and Lexus is the more luxurious version of Toyota’s models.

Renault is a French automaker that was founded in 1899 by Louis Renault and his brothers. I’ve seen relatively few Renault cars here in North America, but have driven them many times in Europe, which is the company’s core market.

95. Les États-__ : UNIS

“Les États-Unis” is what French speakers call “the United States”.

96. Gray matter?: Abbr. : ANAT

“Gray’s Anatomy” is a very successful human anatomy textbook that was first published back in 1858 and is still in print today. The original text was written by English anatomist Henry Gray, who gave his name to the work. The TV medical drama “Grey’s Anatomy” (note “Grey” vs. Gray”) is centered on the character Dr. Meredith Grey, but the show’s title is a nod to the title of the famous textbook.

97. __ es Salaam : DAR

Dar es Salaam is the largest city in Tanzania, and sits right on the east coast of Africa. The city’s name is usually translated from Arabic as “Haven of Peace”.

98. “The Birds” actress : HEDREN

Tippi Hedren is an actress from New Ulm, Minnesota who is best known for her starring roles in two Alfred Hitchcock classics: “The Birds” (1963) and “Marnie” (1964). Famously, Hedren claimed that Hitchcock destroyed her movie career because she would not succumb to his sexual advances, a charge that has been denied.

“The Birds” is a 1963 film made by Alfred Hitchcock based on a short story by Daphne du Maurier. I’ve read the story and seen the film and find them both strangely disturbing (it’s probably just me!). I can’t stand the ending of either version, as nothing resolves itself!

101. Special Forces cap : BERET

The US Army Special Forces are known as the Green Berets because they wear … green berets. The Green Beret is also worn by the Royal Marines of the British Army. When US Army Rangers and OSS operatives were trained by the Royal Marines in Scotland during WWII, graduates of the gruelling training program were awarded green berets by their British instructors. The US soldiers, although proud of their new headgear, were not allowed to wear it as part of their uniform. They had to wait until 1961, when President Kennedy authorized the green beret for exclusive use by US Special Forces.

103. Causes of fear : BUGABOOS

“Bugaboo” is another term for “bogeyman”, an imaginary and scary creature used to frighten children.

108. Three types of (see circled letters) : AVANT-GARDE ROCOCO TRAMP (Three types of ART)

Someone or something described as avant-garde is especially innovative. “Avant-garde” is French for “advance guard”.

The Rococo style is also known as “Late Baroque”. Rococo is a very floral and playful style, very ornate.

The art movement known as Tramp Art was big in the second half of the 19th- and the first half of the 20th-centuries. Tramp Art was relatively unique in that it was created by relatively untrained individuals. Most examples of works were created by carving discarded pieces of wood such as shipping crates and cigar boxes. The name “Tramp Art” was coined after the fact, in 1959, and is misleading. Relatively few homeless people created such works, and most of the artists were home-based.

113. He’s got the life : RILEY

The phrase “life of Riley” dates back to at least 1919. It may have originated in a song from the 1880s about a man named O’Riley and how he became rich and lived an easy life.

114. “Tosca” tune : ARIA

Unlike so many operas, Giacomo Puccini’s “Tosca” was a big hit right from day one, when it was first performed in 1900 at the Teatro Costanzi in Rome. “Tosca” is currently the eighth-most performed opera in America.

116. Omegas’ counterparts : ZEES

The letter named “zed” has been around since about 1400, and derives from the Greek letter zeta. The spelling and pronunciation “zee”, used in America today, first popped up in the 1670s. The spelling and pronunciation “zed” is still used in Britain and Ireland.

Omega is the last letter of the Greek alphabet and is the one that looks like a horseshoe when in uppercase. The lowercase omega looks like a Latin W. The word “omega” literally means “great O” (O-mega). Compare this with the Greek letter Omicron, meaning “little O” (O-micron).

117. Chip dip : SALSA

“Salsa” is simply Spanish for “sauce”.

118. Ballpark figs. : ESTS

Estimate (est.)

Down

2. Parkay product : OLEO

Parkay is a brand of margarine that was introduced in 1937. Parkay is one of the many food products that takes advantage of the success of lobbyists influencing the Food and Drug Administration. Parkay contains trans fats, but the amount is less than half a gram. The FDA allows manufacturers to report such levels as “0g of trans fat”. I tend to go for products that display the wording “no trans fats”.

3. Director Reiner : CARL

The multi-talented Carl Reiner is from the Bronx, New York. Reiner was married to singer Estelle Roberts. You might remember Roberts from the film “When Harry Met Sally” that was directed by Carl’s son, Rob Reiner. Estelle was the woman in the deli who said the famous line “ I’ll have what’s she’s having”, on seeing how excited Meg Ryan apparently was with her sandwich.

7. Waves overhead? : PERM

“Perm” is the common name given to a permanent wave, a chemical or thermal treatment of hair to produce waves or curls. I don’t worry about such things, as it’s a number-one all over for me …

8. Acapulco article : UNA

The Mexican city of Acapulco is on the southwest coast of the country, in the state of Guerrero. The name “Acapulco” translates from the local language into “at the big reeds”.

9. Astronomical measures : PARSECS

A parsec is a measure of length or distance used in astronomy. One parsec is equal to about 19.2 trillion miles.

10. Mars, for one : PLANET

Because Mars is a greater distance from the Sun, the Martian year is about two Earth years long.

11. Sgt. Friday’s force : LAPD

The TV detective show “Dragnet” opened up each episode with lines spoken by the character Sergeant Joe Friday:

This is the city, Los Angeles, California, I work here. I’m a cop.

In later series, the phrase “I’m a cop” was replaced with “I carry a badge”.

13. Designing initials : YSL

Yves Saint Laurent (YSL) was an Algerian-born French fashion designer. Saint Laurent started off working as an assistant to Christian Dior at the age of 17. Dior died just four years later, and as a very young man Saint-Laurent was named head of the House of Dior. However, in 1950 Saint Laurent was conscripted into the French Army and ended up in a military hospital after suffering a mental breakdown from the hazing inflicted on him by his fellow soldiers. His treatment included electroshock therapy and administration of sedatives and psychoactive drugs. He was released from hospital, managed to pull his life back together and started his own fashion house. A remarkable story …

14. Black eye : SHINER

A shiner is something that shines. The term has been used for a “black eye” since 1904.

15. Online break-in : HACK

A computer hacker is a computer expert, and in particular one who uses that expertise to solve problems with hardware and software. So, the original use of the term “hacking” was very positive. Since the 1980s, the term “hacker” is more commonly used for an expert in subverting computer security.

16. Australian export : OPAL

97% of the world’s opals come from Australia, so it’s no surprise perhaps that the opal is the national gemstone of the country. The state of South Australia provides the bulk of the world’s production, i.e. about 80%.

23. Many Qatar natives : ARABS

Qatar is a sovereign state in the Middle East occupying the Qatar Peninsula, itself located in the Arabian Peninsula. Qatar lies on the Persian Gulf and shares one land border, with Saudi Arabia to the south. Qatar has more oil and gas reserves per capita of population than any other country in the world. In 2010, Qatar had the fastest growing economy in the world, driven by the petrochemical industry. Qatar is scheduled to host the 2022 FIFA World Cup, although the nation’s eligibility to do so is under question after a far-reaching bribery scandal was uncovered at the sport’s governing body.

30. Stand-up sort : MENSCH

“Mensch” is a word that comes to us via Yiddish, ultimately derived from the German “mensch” meaning “human being”. We use the term to mean someone of integrity and honor.

31. Star of the animated short “Two Scent’s Worth” : LE PEW

Pepé Le Pew is a very likeable cartoon character from the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series. Pepé is a French skunk, first introduced way back in 1945. He is always thinking of “l’amour” and chases the lady skunks, or a black cat with a white stripe accidentally painted down her back.

32. Farr of “M*A*S*H” : JAMIE

Actor Jamie Farr is best known for playing the cross-dressing Max Klinger in the sitcom ”M*A*S*H”. Although Farr landed a role in the 1955 movie “Blackboard Jungle”, his career didn’t really take off until he started appearing regularly on “The Red Skelton Show”. Years later he managed to get a one-episode appearance in ”M*A*S*H”, and his character and performance were received so well that he became a regular on the show. Farr actually did serve in the US Army in Korea, although it was after hostilities had ended. The dog tags that Farr wore when filming ”M*A*S*H” were the ones that he actually wore while serving in the military.

35. Chinese city known for its Terracotta Army : XI’AN

Xi’an, the capital of the Shaanxi province of China, is one of the oldest cities in the country, with history going back over 3,000 years. It is home to the Terracotta Army, a huge collection of terracotta sculptures that date back to the 2nd century BCE, and that were discovered buried in the ground around Xi’an. Today, in contemporary China, Xi’an is figuring at the forefront of the country’s participation in the modern world. China’s second aerospace center is being built in Xi’an, for example, and the city is also home to the world’s largest Internet Cafe/Bar, a facility with over 3,000 computers.

37. High-end hotel employees : VALETS

A varlet was an attendant or servant, and perhaps a knight’s page. The term comes from the Old French “vaslet” meaning “squire, young man”, which also gave us our contemporary word “valet”.

39. Havens : OASES

An isolated area of vegetation in a desert is called an oasis (plural “oases”). As water is needed for plant growth, an oasis might also include a spring, pond or small lake. We often use the term “oasis” more generally to describe a haven, a place of rest.

45. Fed. fiscal agency : OMB

The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) is the successor to the Bureau of the Budget that was formed in 1970 during the Nixon administration. The main task of the OMB is to prepare the budget for the federal government. The Director of the OMB is a member of the Cabinet.

46. Fine wool : MERINO

The Merino breed of sheep is prized for the soft quality of its wool.

47. Bath in Baja : BANO

Baja California is both the most northern and the most western of the Mexican states. The name translates from Spanish as “Lower California”.

54. Prefix with linear : RECTI-

Something described as rectilinear is characterized by straight lines.

62. Nile valley native : NUBIAN

Nubia is a region shared by Egypt and Sudan that lies along the Nile river. The name “Nubia” comes from the Nuba people who settled in the area in the 4th century.

66. Many a bagpiper : SCOT

Bagpipes have been played for centuries all across Europe, in parts of Asia and North Africa, and in the Persian Gulf. However, the most famous versions of the instrument today are the Scottish Great Highland bagpipe and the Irish uilleann pipes, my personal favorite (I’m biased). The bag in the Scottish version is inflated by blowing into it, whereas the Irish version uses a bellows under the arm.

68. Norwegian king, 995-1000 : OLAF I

It is believed that Norwegian King Olaf I led the conversion of the Vikings to Christianity, and built the first church in the country (in 995 CE). Olaf was actually married to an Irishwoman, albeit a woman from a Viking family. Queen Gyda was the sister of the King of Dublin, Olaf Cuaran.

70. Spiral-horned African antelope : NYALA

A nyala is an antelope from South Africa with spiral horns. “Nyala” is the Swahili name for the beast.

75. Part of CBS: Abbr. : SYS

CBS used to be known as the Columbia Broadcasting System. CBS introduced its “eye” logo in 1951. That logo is based on a Pennsylvania Dutch hex sign.

77. Author James and baseball’s Tommie : AGEES

James Agee was a noted American film critic and screenwriter. Agee wrote an autobiographical novel “A Death in the Family” that won him his Pulitzer in 1958, albeit posthumously. He was also one of the screenwriters for the 1951 classic movie “The African Queen”.

Tommie Agee was a Major League Baseball player who played mainly with the Indians, White Sox and Mets. He was one of the “Amazin’ Mets”, and was famous for making two phenomenal catches in game three of the 1969 world series, potentially saving five runs. Agee was also the first Mets outfielder to win a Gold Glove, doing so in 1970.

79. Censorship-fighting org. : ACLU

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) has its roots in the First World War when it was founded to provide legal advice and support to conscientious objectors. The ACLU’s motto is “Because Freedom Can’t Protect Itself”. The ACLU also hosts a blog on the ACLU.org website called “Speak Freely”.

85. Gulf War journalist Peter : ARNETT

Peter Arnett is an American journalist who is originally from New Zealand. I mainly remember him from his coverage of the Gulf War for CNN, although Arnett was awarded his Pulitzer Prize in 1966 for his work in Vietnam during the war there.

89. Diamond weight : CARAT

The carat is a unit of mass equal to 200 mg. It is used in sizing gemstones.

91. Root vegetable : TURNIP

The names of veggies cause me grief sometimes. What’s called a turnip here in the US, we call a swede back in Ireland. An Irishman’s turnip is a rutabaga over here. Thank goodness a potato is a potato, or I’d just give up altogether 🙂

94. Major Japanese port : NAGOYA

Nagoya is the third-largest city in Japan. It is a port city on the island of Honshu. Nagoya is home to many large manufacturing operations, including Mitsubishi Aircraft Company.

101. Cheese on crackers : BRIE

Brie is a soft cheese that is named for the French region in which it originated. Brie is similar to the equally famous (and delicious) Camembert.

103. Cotton capsule : BOLL

The boll is the seed-bearing capsule of some plants, particularly of flax and cotton.

104. Highlands hillside : BRAE

“Brae” is a lowland Scots word for the slope or brow of a hill.

105. Pair in a dinghy : OARS

Our word “dinghy” comes from the Hindi “dingi”, a word meaning “small boat”.

109. Carpentry tool : ADZ

An adze (also “adz”) is similar to an axe, but is different in that the blade of an adze is set at right angles to the tool’s shaft. An axe blade is set in line with the shaft.

110. Langley org. : CIA

The CIA headquarters is located in Langley, Virginia in a complex called the George Bush Center for Intelligence. The facility was named for former Director of the CIA and US President George H. W. Bush.

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Eponymous Chanel perfume : COCO
5. Eagerly enjoy, as praise : LAP UP
10. Latitude : PLAY
14. Not barefoot : SHOD
18. Banned fruit spray : ALAR
19. Gladiator’s realm : ARENA
20. Pull-up beneficiaries : LATS
21. Mold : SHAPE
22. Three types of (see circled letters) : MERCATOR AREA POLITICAL (Three types of MAP)
26. Naturally lit room : SOLARIUM
27. “500” initials : S AND P
28. Stick in one’s craw : RANKLE
29. Q and A part: Abbr. : ANS
30. Allocate, with “out” : METE
31. Word often paired with “great” : LATE
32. Three types of (see circled letters) : JUMBO EXECUTIVE TURBO (Three types of JET)
40. Mimics : APES
41. Gadget’s rank: Abbr. : INSP
42. Ann and May : CAPES
43. Much of “Deck the Halls” : LAS
45. Eclipse, maybe : OMEN
46. Wharton postgrad awards : MBAS
48. “Bravo!” : OLE!
49. Speech problem : LISP
50. Three types of (see circled letters) : MINUTE ANCHOR NEWSPAPER (Three types of MAN)
57. Resting place : BED
58. Reception vessel : URN
59. Most healthy : HALEST
60. More than proper : PRISSY
61. Electrolysis particle : ANION
63. [not my error] : SIC
64. Solemn : STAID
66. “__ in the Boy’s Room”: 1973-’74 hit : SMOKIN’
69. Prepares to transplant : UNPOTS
72. Control : OWN
73. Small batteries : AAS
76. Three types of (see circled letters) : CALICO ABYSSINIAN TABBY (Three types of CAT)
80. “Chestnuts roasting __ open fire” : ON AN
81. Supermodel Carangi : GIA
82. “Hamlet” quintet : ACTS
83. Clambake trash : COBS
84. Graphics file extension : TIF
85. “Let’s Make __” : A DEAL
87. Hit the bottle : TOPE
89. History Muse : CLIO
90. Three types of (see circled letters) : CITROEN ACURA RENAULT (Three types of CAR)
95. Les États-__ : UNIS
96. Gray matter?: Abbr. : ANAT
97. __ es Salaam : DAR
98. “The Birds” actress : HEDREN
101. Special Forces cap : BERET
103. Causes of fear : BUGABOOS
108. Three types of (see circled letters) : AVANT-GARDE ROCOCO TRAMP (Three types of ART)
111. Confine : LIMIT
112. Works in the garden : DIGS
113. He’s got the life : RILEY
114. “Tosca” tune : ARIA
115. Swing noisily, as a shutter : FLAP
116. Omegas’ counterparts : ZEES
117. Chip dip : SALSA
118. Ballpark figs. : ESTS

Down

1. Pic takers : CAMS
2. Parkay product : OLEO
3. Director Reiner : CARL
4. Marine predator : ORCA
5. About one-third of MLB players : LATINO
6. Fire up : AROUSE
7. Waves overhead? : PERM
8. Acapulco article : UNA
9. Astronomical measures : PARSECS
10. Mars, for one : PLANET
11. Sgt. Friday’s force : LAPD
12. Resting on : ATOP
13. Designing initials : YSL
14. Black eye : SHINER
15. Online break-in : HACK
16. Australian export : OPAL
17. Remove from a manuscript : DELE
21. Prestige : STATUS
23. Many Qatar natives : ARABS
24. Eagerly enjoy : EAT UP
25. About to explode : IRATE
30. Stand-up sort : MENSCH
31. Star of the animated short “Two Scent’s Worth” : LE PEW
32. Farr of “M*A*S*H” : JAMIE
33. Flip over : UPEND
34. Computer list : MENU
35. Chinese city known for its Terracotta Army : XI’AN
36. PC screen images : ICONS
37. High-end hotel employees : VALETS
38. Radar screen images : BLIPS
39. Havens : OASES
44. Agile : SPRY
45. Fed. fiscal agency : OMB
46. Fine wool : MERINO
47. Bath in Baja : BANO
49. Made, as a bet : LAID
51. Roman garment : TUNIC
52. Door fasteners : HASPS
53. Eclectic mixes : OLIOS
54. Prefix with linear : RECTI-
55. Salmon egg deposits : SPAWNS
56. In __: published : PRINT
61. Analogous : AKIN
62. Nile valley native : NUBIAN
65. Perfectly : TO A T
66. Many a bagpiper : SCOT
67. Bouncing off the walls : MANIC
68. Norwegian king, 995-1000 : OLAF I
70. Spiral-horned African antelope : NYALA
71. Attack verbally : SNAP AT
73. Bubbling hot : ABOIL
74. Monastery head : ABBOT
75. Part of CBS: Abbr. : SYS
77. Author James and baseball’s Tommie : AGEES
78. Cake-decorating artist : ICER
79. Censorship-fighting org. : ACLU
85. Gulf War journalist Peter : ARNETT
86. “Nothing __!” : DOING
87. Radio knob : TUNER
88. Figures of speech? : ORATORS
89. Diamond weight : CARAT
91. Root vegetable : TURNIP
92. Gentle touch : CARESS
93. Brings out : EDUCES
94. Major Japanese port : NAGOYA
98. Not quite a majority : HALF
99. Bad to the bone : EVIL
100. Spanish lady : DAMA
101. Cheese on crackers : BRIE
102. Barely beat : EDGE
103. Cotton capsule : BOLL
104. Highlands hillside : BRAE
105. Pair in a dinghy : OARS
106. Bypass : OMIT
107. Resorts with body wraps : SPAS
109. Carpentry tool : ADZ
110. Langley org. : CIA

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8 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 14 Oct 18, Sunday”

  1. One hour and 18 min. with one error….. Had ball for boll.
    I was moving along pretty well until I ran into Mercator ,Citroen ,Abyssinian, and rococo ( all foreign to me).
    GO RAVENS

  2. LAT: 20:07, no errors. Newsday: 17:30, no errors. Croce (2016/11/18): about two hours, no errors; a relatively easy one except for one corner that I had to walk away from several times.

    Yesterday, it was sunny and warm (68) here. As I write this, it’s down to 24 and snowing. Colorado … 😳 … 😜.

  3. 37:26. Clever but cumbersome theme today. Didn’t know MERCATOR, ABYSSINIAN, ROCOCO or TRAMP so the theme answers were a bit of a slog in spots.

    Looked up MERCATOR maps. Interesting that they were developed for navigation as they keep all longitude and latitude lines at 90 degree angles. That kept sailors (and, I assume, later pilots) from having to recalculate their bearings.

    Best –

  4. 31:36, and 7 errors, mostly due to failure to proofread near the bottom at the end: I entered AWL for the tool instead of checking to see if it would mess up the other entries needed for ADZ (and of course, it did). One mistake, at the cross of HEDR(EN)/ARN(E)TT, was caused by the cross of two proper names, which can be spelled all kinds of ways. *Hate* to see that, in an otherwise enjoyable puzzle.

  5. Hiya folks!!!🙃
    I’m going to say no errors on this one — one letter I meant to go back and change before coming here but forgot — so I’m giving myself 100%, based on intention. ☺

    Fun puzzle! Got most of the theme answers; just didn’t know MERCATOR or TRAMP. Should have known that TRAMP!! When I do art I also use “found” materials and shallow wood boxes– I’m also definitely untrained!! …but I use the term “assemblage,” and I guess I’ll continue to do so as it sounds more *sophisticated*. 😀😀😀

    Be well ~~✌🏻

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