LA Times Crossword 7 Oct 18, Sunday

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Constructed by: Jeffrey Wechsler
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: The Irreverent Grammarian

Themed answers are phrases used in GRAMMAR that have been reinterpreted:

  • 22A. Confident opinion piece? : DEFINITE ARTICLE
  • 34A. Ammonia and water? : COMPOUND WORDS
  • 49A. Overlap in a photo lab? : DOUBLE NEGATIVE
  • 81A. Truce that’s barely holding? : TENSE AGREEMENT
  • 96A. Consecutive jail terms? : RUN-ON SENTENCE
  • 112A. Will sections covering family members? : RELATIVE CLAUSES

Bill’s time: 14m 51s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Repetitive geometric patterns : FRACTALS

A fractal is a fascinating geometric shape, one that can be split into parts, each of which is a smaller version (almost identical to) of the larger shape. The name “fractal” comes from the Latin “fractus” meaning “broken” or “fragmented”. Fractals are found all over nature, most notably the shapes created by ice crystals. It can be hard to tell the difference between the shapes of ice as it freezes on glass, viewed with the eye or viewed under a microscope. Fractals can also be seen in clouds, snowflakes, and even in cauliflower and broccoli!

9. Collinsworth with many Sports Emmys : CRIS

Cris Collinsworth is a sportscaster for several broadcasting organizations. Collinsworth played as a wide receiver in the NFL for eight seasons with the Cincinnati Bengals.

18. Ricky Martin’s birthplace : PUERTO RICO

Puerto Rico (PR) is located in the northeastern Caribbean (in the Atlantic Ocean), east of the Dominican Republic. The name “Puerto Rico” is Spanish for “rich port”. The locals often call their island Borinquen, the Spanish form of “Boriken”, the original name used by the natives.

Ricky Martin’s real name is Enrique Martin Morales. A native of Puerto Rico, Martin first achieved fame with the boy band Menudo before going solo in 1991.

20. Use a hammock : REST

Our word “hammock” comes via Spanish from Haiti, evolving from a word used there to describe a fishing net.

27. Where Brazil took Olympic soccer gold : RIO

The gold medal men’s soccer match at the 2016 Olympics was won by the home team Brazil. Brazil were tied 1-1 with Germany after full-time, and then won 5-4 on penalties.

29. Concert finale? : -INA

A concertina operates much like an accordion, with the main difference being that that the concertina has buttons/keys on both ends, and the accordion only on one end.

34. Ammonia and water? : COMPOUND WORDS

Ammonia is a colorless gas with a very strong smell. The compound has the chemical formula NH3. The name “ammonia” comes from salt deposits (actually the salt “ammonium chloride”) that the Romans collected near the Temple of Amun in ancient Libya.

A water molecule is composed of an oxygen atom with two hydrogen atoms on roughly opposite sides (about a 150-degree angle). So, sometimes the molecule is represented by “HOH”, although more usually it’s “H2O”.

44. Aveeno competitor : OLAY

Oil of Olay was developed in South Africa in 1949. When Oil of Olay was introduced internationally, it was given slightly different brand names designed to appeal in the different geographies. In Ireland we know it as Oil of Ulay, for example, and in France it is Oil of Olaz.

Aveeno is a manufacturer of skincare and haircare products that was founded in 1945. The name Aveeno comes from the Latin name for the common oat, i.e. Avena sativa.

45. Mark of shame : STIGMA

A stigma (plural “stigmata), in a social sense, is a distinguishing mark of disgrace. For example, one might have to suffer the stigma of being in prison. The term derives from the Greek “stigma” meaning “mark, brand”.

53. Writer Deighton : LEN

I used to walk my dog right past author Len Deighton’s house years ago, as we lived in the same village in Ireland (probably my only claim to “fame”). Deighton wrote the excellent espionage thriller “The IPCRESS File”, made was into a 1965 movie starring Michael Caine.

57. Ambulance gp. : EMS

Emergency medical services (EMS)

Our word “ambulance” originated in the French term “hôpital ambulant” meaning field hospital (literally “walking hospital”). In the 1850s, the term started to be used for a vehicle transporting the wounded from the battlefield, leading to our “ambulance”.

58. Org. with no “L” in its name, ironically : CTA

The Chicago “L” is the second largest rapid transit system in the US, with the New York City Subway being the largest. The “L” is also the second oldest, again with the New York City Subway system having the honor of being around the longest. Note that the official nickname for the system is the “L” (originally short for “elevated railroad”), although the term “El” is also in common use (especially in crosswords as “ELS”). The L is managed by the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA).

62. Disney film starring Auli’i Cravalho : MOANA

“Moana” is a 2016 animated feature film and the 56th animated Disney movie. The title character is the daughter of a Polynesian chief who heads off in search of the demigod Maui, hoping that he can save her people.

Auliʻi Cravalho is an actress who made her debut voicing the title character in the 2016 animated feature “Moana”. Cravalho is a native of Hawaii, and reprised her role as Moana in a Hawaiian-language dubbed version of the film.

66. Author Dinesen : ISAK

“Isak Dinesen” was the pen name of the Danish author Baroness Karen Blixen. Blixen’s most famous title by far is “Out of Africa”, her account of the time she spent living in Kenya.

67. Adam? : FIRST PERSON

According to the Bible, God created Adam from “the dust of the ground”. Eve was created as Adam’s companion, from Adam’s rib.

73. Pride group : LIONS

Here are some colorful collective nouns:

  • A pride of lions
  • A shrewdness of apes
  • A cloud of bats
  • A bench of bishops
  • A clowder of cats
  • A waddling of ducks
  • An army of frogs
  • A knot of toads

75. Saint-Tropez summer : ETE

Saint-Tropez is a town in southeastern France on the French Riviera. These days, Saint-Tropez is very much associated with the European and American jet set. The town is named for a legendary martyr named Saint Torpes of Pisa. Torpes was supposedly executed on the orders of the Roman Emperor Nero. Having been beheaded, his head was tossed into the river Arno, and his body placed in a boat along with a cock and a dog who were to eat the body. The boat came ashore at the present-day location of Saint-Tropez, with the body untouched by the cock and the dog. The local people named their village in honor of Saint Torpes.

76. Title like Bugs Bunny’s “Hare Trigger” : PUN

“Hare Trigger” is a 1945 cartoon short featuring Bugs Bunny. Notably, Yosemite Sam made his first appearance in “Hare Trigger”.

79. Macbeth and Macduff : THANES

Thanes were Scottish aristocrats. The most famous thanes have to be the Shakespearean characters Macbeth (the Thane of Glamis, later Thane of Cawdor, and still later King of Scotland) and MacDuff (the Thane of Fife). Other thanes in “Macbeth” are Ross, Lennox and Angus, as well as Menteith and Caithness.

84. Olympic contact sport : JUDO

Judo is a martial art from Japan that was developed relatively recently, in 1882. The name “judo” translates as “gentle way”. Practitioners of judo proceed through a series of proficiency grades known as the kyu-dan system. At each progression, a different colored belt is awarded.

90. Souse’s woe : DTS

The episodes of delirium that can accompany withdrawal from alcohol are called delirium tremens (the DTs). The literal translation of this Latin phrase is “trembling madness”.

The word “souse” dates back to the 14th century and means to pickle, steep in vinegar. In the early 1600s the usage was applied to someone pickled in booze, a drunkard.

93. White Castle offerings : SLIDERS

Sliders are small hamburgers. One suggestion is that the “slider” originated in the US Navy, with the name being a reference to greasy hamburgers sliding back and forth across the grill as a ship pitches and rolls. More recently, the slider became associated with the White Castle fast food chain of restaurants. White Castle introduced the “Slyder” in 1985.

107. Biblical voyage terminus : ARARAT

Mount Ararat is in Turkey. Ararat is a snow-capped, dormant volcano with two peaks. The higher of the two, Greater Ararat, is the tallest peak in the country. Ararat takes its name from a legendary Armenian hero called Ara the Beautiful (or Ara the Handsome). According to the Book of Genesis, Noah’s ark landed on Mount Ararat as the Great Flood subsided.

109. Bierce’s definition of it starts, “A temporary insanity curable by marriage” : LOVE

“The Devil’s Dictionary” is a satirical work by Ambrose Bierce, consisting of a list of common words with some very amusing definitions. First published in 1911, “The Devil’s Dictionary” is a more complete version of Bierce’s 1906 publication “The Cynic’s Word Book”. Here are some of my favorite definitions found therein:

  • Cabbage, n. A familiar kitchen-garden vegetable about as large and wise as a man’s head.
  • Corporation, n. An ingenious device for obtaining individual profit without individual responsibility.
  • Dentist, n. A prestidigitator who, putting metal into your mouth, pulls coins out of your pocket.
  • Love, n. A temporary insanity curable by marriage.
  • Hers, pron. His.
  • Money, n. A blessing that is of no advantage to us excepting when we part with it.
  • Quotation, n: The act of repeating erroneously the words of another.
  • Selfish, adj. Devoid of consideration for the selfishness of others.
  • Sweater, n. Garment worn by child when its mother is feeling chilly.
  • Year, n. A period of three hundred and sixty-five disappointments.

110. Buddhist spiritual text : SUTRA

The word “sutra” is used in Hinduism for a learned text, one usually meant to be studied by students.

120. Iditarod array : SLEDS

The Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race covers an incredible 1,161 miles, from Anchorage to Nome in Alaska. The race starts every year on the first Saturday in March, with the first race having been held in 1973. Finishing times range from over 8 days, to 15 days or more. The first few races only used a northern route, but then a southern route was added to the roster every second year. It’s kind of a good thing, because when the racers take the northern route they don’t even pass through the town of Iditarod!

122. Bar for adults and children : SNICKERS

Snickers is a candy bar made by Mars. When I was growing up in Ireland, the same candy bar was sold as a Marathon. The name was changed in Europe to Snickers in 1990. 75% of the world’s Snickers bars are made in the Mars factory in Waco, Texas.

Down

4. Many an Amazon dely. : CTN

Carton (ctn.)

5. Nome : yours :: Nice : à __ : TOI

The French city of Nice is on the Mediterranean coast in the southeast of the country. Although Nice is only the fifth most populous city in France, it is home to the busiest airport outside of Paris. That’s because of all the tourists flocking to the French Riviera.

6. Collages and such : ART

A collage is a piece of artwork that is made by assembling pieces of paper and objects that are glued onto paper or canvas. The term “collage” comes from the French “coller” meaning “to glue”.

10. Page one, generally : RECTO

The left and right pages of a book or magazine are known in publishing circles as verso and recto. Recto comes from the Latin for “right”, and verso comes from the Latin word for “turned”. The idea is that the left side of the page is “turned” and is the reverse of the recto/right side.

12. Chest protector : STERNUM

“Sternum” (plural “sterna”) is the Latin name for the breastbone. “Sternon” is a Greek for “chest, breastbone”.

14. Carrier with HQ in Tokyo : ANA

All Nippon Airways (ANA) is a Japanese airline, one that is now larger in size that the nation’s flag carrier Japan Airlines (JAL).

16. Corrected : EMENDED

The verb “to amend” means “to change for the better, put right, alter by adding”. The related verb “to emend” is used more rarely and mainly in reference to the editing of professional writing. Both terms are derived from the Latin “emendare” meaning “to remove fault”.

17. Zhou or Qin : DYNASTY

The Zhou dynasty was the longest lasting dynasty in the history of China. It is divided into two distinct periods, with the Western Zhou preceding the Eastern Zhou.

The Qin Dynasty was established in 221 BC after the state of Qin conquered six other states. The Qin was China’s first imperial dynasty, and lasted until 206 BC when the Han Dynasty wielded power.

18. Palm gadgets, briefly : PDAS

Personal digital assistant (PDA)

19. Neighbor of Taurus : ORION

The very recognizable constellation of Orion is named for the Greek god Orion, the Hunter. If you take a look at the star in Orion’s “right shoulder”, the second brightest star in the constellation, you might notice that it is quite red in color. This is the famous star called Betelgeuse, a red supergiant, a huge star that is on its way out. Betelgeuse is expected to explode into a supernova within the next thousand years or so. You don’t want to miss that …

Taurus (Latin for “bull”) is a large constellation seen in the winter sky in the northern hemisphere. The brightest star in Taurus is the red giant Aldebaran. NASA space probe Pioneer 10, launched in 1972, is heading towards Aldebaran after having completed its primary mission close to Jupiter. The probe should get to Aldebaran in two million years time. Watch this space …

23. Pro __ : TEM

“Pro tempore” can be abbreviated to “pro tem” or “p.t.” “Pro tempore” is a Latin phrase that best translates as “for the time being”. It is used to describe a person who is acting for another, usually a superior. The President pro tempore of the US Senate is the person who presides over the Senate in the absence of the Vice President of the US. It has been tradition since 1890 that the president pro tem is the most senior senator in the majority party. The president pro tem ranks highly in the line of succession to the presidency, falling third in line after the Vice President and the Speaker of the House.

31. Much of Micronesia’s makeup : ATOLLS

Micronesia is one of the three island regions of Oceania, along with Polynesia and Melanesia. The sovereign nations included in the region are the Federated States of Micronesia, the Marshall Islands, Nauru and Palau. Also in Micronesia are the US territories of Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands and Wake Island.

38. Joe-__ weed: herbal remedy : PYE

Joe Pye was an Indian healer from New England who used the Eutrochium plants as herbal remedies, which led to the name “Joe-Pye weeds“.

41. Building : EDIFICE

To edify is to provide instruction in order to improve spiritually, morally or intellectually. The intent is to “build up” someone’s faith or morality, and so “edify” comes from the Latin “aedificare” meaning “to build, construct”. This Latin root also gives us our word “edifice”, meaning “massive building”.

42. Supposedly medicinal herb that sounds relevant to chiropractors : BONESET

The plant Eupatorium perfoliatum is commonly known as “boneset”. The herbs dried leaves were a favoured remedy of Native Americans for many disorders. The name “boneset” come from its use in the 1800s for a kind of flu known as “break-bone fever”, and now called dengue fever.

46. “Whether __ nobler … “: Hamlet : ‘TIS

There has been centuries of debate about how one interprets Hamlet’s soliloquy that begins “To be or not to be …”. My favorite opinion is that Hamlet is weighing up the pros and cons of suicide (“to not be”).

To be, or not to be, that is the question:
Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The Slings and Arrows of outrageous fortune;
Or to take Armes against a Sea of troubles …

51. Honor roll stats : GPAS

Grade point average (GPA)

54. “The Green Mile” subj. : ESP

Extrasensory perception (ESP)

“The Green Mile” is a Stephen King novel that was made into a very successful 1999 film of the same name starring Tom Hanks. The novel was published as six low-priced paperback volumes throughout 1996, and then as a single paperback the following year.

57. Slaughter of old baseball : ENOS

Enos Slaughter has a remarkable playing record in Major League Baseball over a 19-year career. Slaughter’s record is particularly remarkable given that he left baseball for three years to serve in the military during WWII.

59. Badger : TORMENT

To badger is to harass. The verb “to badger” comes from the cruel practice of badger-baiting, which dates back to medieval times. Badger-baiting is a blood sport in which a dog is used as bait for a badger in its den, to draw it out into the open. The den is an artificial structure built to resemble a natural badgers’ den, complete with a tunnel entrance. The dog is sent down the tunnel causing the badger and dog to lock their jaws on each other. The badger and dog are then removed from the den by pulling on the dog’s tale. Horrible …

62. Personal bearing : MIEN

One’s mien is one’s bearing or manner. “Mien” shares the same etymological root as our word “demeanor”.

63. Hosp. areas : ORS

Surgery (surg.) is usually performed in an operating room (OR).

64. Common ID : SSN

The main purpose of a Social Security Number (SSN) is to track individuals for the purposes of taxation, although given its ubiquitous use, it is looking more and more like an identity number to me. The social security number system was introduced in 1936. Prior to 1986, an SSN was required only for persons with substantial income so many children under 14 had no number assigned. For some years the IRS had a concern that a lot of people were claiming children on their tax returns who did not actually exist. So, from 1986 onward, it is a requirement to get an SSN for any dependents over the age of 5. Sure enough, seven million dependents “disappeared” in 1987.

67. Sugar in much corn syrup : FRUCTOSE

Fructose is also known as “fruit sugar”. It is commonly found in plants, and is the most water-soluble of all sugars. Many of us consume a lot of “high-fructose corn syrup”. This is a sweetener made from corn starch that is a mixture of glucose and fructose. The natural ratio of fructose to glucose is altered to produce a sweeter syrup by chemically converting much of the naturally occurring glucose into fructose.

68. Celt’s land : EIRE

The Celts were a very broad group of people across Europe, linked by common languages. The Celts were largely absorbed by other cultures, although a relatively modern revival of the “Celtic identity” is alive and well in the British Isles. Such Celtic peoples today are mainly found in Ireland, Scotland, Wales and Brittany in France.

69. Actress Salazar of “Maze Runner” movies : ROSA

Rosa Salazar is an actress best known on the small screen for her roles in the shows “Parenthood” and “American Horror Story: Murder House”. On the big screen, she played Lynn in “The Divergent Series” movies and Brenda in the “Maze Runner” films.

72. Venerable letters in global news : UPI

Founded in 1958, United Press International (UPI) used to be one of the biggest news agencies in the world, sending out news by wire to the major newspapers. UPI ran into trouble with the change in media formats at the end of the twentieth century and lost many of its clients as the afternoon newspapers shut down due to the advent of television news. UPI, which once employed thousands, still exists today but with just a fraction of that workforce.

77. Smallest Canadian prov. : PEI

Prince Edward Island (PEI) is a maritime Canadian province. The island at the center of the province was named for Prince Edward, the fourth son of King George III and the father of Queen Victoria. PEI is the smallest Canadian province, both in terms of land area and population.

79. Belief : TENET

A tenet is an article of faith, something that is held to be true. “Tenet” is Latin for “he holds”.

80. Con __: tempo marking : MOTO

The musical term “con moto” indicates that a passage should be played quickly, briskly, The term translates from Italian as “with motion”.

82. Sporty VW : GTI

The Volkswagen Rabbit is a small, front-wheel drive car that is sold as the Volkswagen Golf outside of North America. There is a very popular GTI version of the Golf that was introduced in 1976. The initialism “GTI” stands for Grand Tourer Injection.

83. Designer Gernreich : RUDI

Rudi Gernreich was a fashion designer, born in Austria. Gernreich fled Austria due to Nazi influence, and ended up in Los Angeles. He is noted for design of the monokini, the first topless swimsuit.

84. Gavel wielders : JURISTS

The small hammer that one raps on a table or desk to call a meeting to order, or perhaps to signify a sale at an auction, that’s called a gavel. The term “gavel” is actually American English, a word that emerged in the early 19th century.

86. Unlikely banquet setting : DINETTE

A banquet is an elaborate feast. “Banquet” is a term that seems to have reversed in meaning over time. Coming into English via French from Old Italian, “banquet” is derived from “banco” meaning “bench”. The original “banco” meal was simply a snack eaten on a bench, rather than at a table. I guess we eat more these days …

93. Legal tender substitute : SCRIP

Scrip isn’t legal tender, but operates just like currency in specific applications. It is in effect a form of credit. Originally the word “scrip” was used for a certificate giving one the right to receive something, often shares of a stock. “Scrip” is probably short for (sub)script(ion) receipt.

100. D.C. athlete : NAT

The Washington Nationals (“Nats”) baseball team started out life as the Montreal Expos in 1969, and were the first Major League Baseball team in Canada. The Expos moved to Washington in 2005 becoming the Nats. There are only two Major Leagues teams that have never played in a World Series, one being the Mariners and the other the Nats.

108. Shore bird : TERN

Terns are a family of seabirds. They are similar to gulls, but more slender and more lightly built. Many species of tern are known for their long-distance migrations, with the Arctic tern migrating so far that it is believed to see more daylight in a year than any other animal.

111. Like two-thirds of Austria’s flag : RED

The Austrian flag comprises three horizontal bands, with red on top and bottom, and white in the middle.

113. Dominique’s thirst quencher : EAU

In French, one can find “eau” (water) in a “rivière” (river).

114. 15-season show whose final episode was “Immortality” : CSI

The “CSI” TV show franchise uses hits from the Who as theme music:

  • “Who Are You” … “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation”
  • “Baba O’Riley” … “CSI: New York”
  • “Won’t Get Fooled Again” … “CSI: Miami”
  • “I Can See for Miles” … “CSI: Cyber”

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Repetitive geometric patterns : FRACTALS
9. Collinsworth with many Sports Emmys : CRIS
13. Showed openly : BARED
18. Ricky Martin’s birthplace : PUERTO RICO
20. Use a hammock : REST
21. Other side : ENEMY
22. Confident opinion piece? : DEFINITE ARTICLE
24. Approach evening : LATEN
25. Eligibility factors : AGES
26. Most in need of water : DRIEST
27. Where Brazil took Olympic soccer gold : RIO
29. Concert finale? : -INA
30. Pitcher’s problem : SORE ARM
34. Ammonia and water? : COMPOUND WORDS
37. Get more precipitous : STEEPEN
39. Regret : RUE
40. Track event : MEET
41. Draw back : EBB
44. Aveeno competitor : OLAY
45. Mark of shame : STIGMA
48. Hot tub feature : EDDY
49. Overlap in a photo lab? : DOUBLE NEGATIVE
53. Writer Deighton : LEN
55. Remark that hurts : INSULT
56. Track winnings : PURSE
57. Ambulance gp. : EMS
58. Org. with no “L” in its name, ironically : CTA
61. Brings down : FELLS
62. Disney film starring Auli’i Cravalho : MOANA
64. Cell pic : SNAPSHOT
66. Author Dinesen : ISAK
67. Adam? : FIRST PERSON
70. E-commerce icon : CART
71. Officially rebukes : CENSURES
73. Pride group : LIONS
74. Focus of much TV drama : CRIME
75. Saint-Tropez summer : ETE
76. Title like Bugs Bunny’s “Hare Trigger” : PUN
77. Harbor sights : PIERS
79. Macbeth and Macduff : THANES
80. Handheld amp? : MIC
81. Truce that’s barely holding? : TENSE AGREEMENT
84. Olympic contact sport : JUDO
87. Ad rep’s links : TIE-INS
89. Adjust for pitch : TUNE
90. Souse’s woe : DTS
91. Single section : UNIT
92. Single : ONE
93. White Castle offerings : SLIDERS
96. Consecutive jail terms? : RUN-ON SENTENCE
101. “I can’t eat all this!” : IT’S A LOT!
105. British verb suffix : -ISE
106. Always, poetically : E’ER
107. Biblical voyage terminus : ARARAT
109. Bierce’s definition of it starts, “A temporary insanity curable by marriage” : LOVE
110. Buddhist spiritual text : SUTRA
112. Will sections covering family members? : RELATIVE CLAUSES
117. Spud : TATER
118. Sturdy trees : OAKS
119. Not giving up : PERSISTENT
120. Iditarod array : SLEDS
121. Scheme : RUSE
122. Bar for adults and children : SNICKERS

Down

1. Felipe’s fire : FUEGO
2. Point (to) : REFER
3. Comes up : ARISES
4. Many an Amazon dely. : CTN
5. Nome : yours :: Nice : à __ : TOI
6. Collages and such : ART
7. Wasn’t true : LIED
8. Not often seen : SCARCE
9. Autumn adjective : CRISP
10. Page one, generally : RECTO
11. Part of 77-Down: Abbr. : ISL
12. Chest protector : STERNUM
13. Not on deck : BELOW
14. Carrier with HQ in Tokyo : ANA
15. No longer playing : RETIRED
16. Corrected : EMENDED
17. Zhou or Qin : DYNASTY
18. Palm gadgets, briefly : PDAS
19. Neighbor of Taurus : ORION
23. Pro __ : TEM
28. Mr. Right, presumably : IDEAL MAN
31. Much of Micronesia’s makeup : ATOLLS
32. Get a new tenant for : RELET
33. Indicate : MEAN
35. Strong desire : URGE
36. Sign that may make you nervous : OMEN
38. Joe-__ weed: herbal remedy : PYE
41. Building : EDIFICE
42. Supposedly medicinal herb that sounds relevant to chiropractors : BONESET
43. Restricted road part : BUS LANE
45. Like some elegant gowns : STRAPLESS
46. “Whether __ nobler … “: Hamlet : ‘TIS
47. “__ been there” : I’VE
50. Adds muscle mass, with “up” : BULKS
51. Honor roll stats : GPAS
52. Family member : AUNT
54. “The Green Mile” subj. : ESP
57. Slaughter of old baseball : ENOS
58. Confined, in a way : CHAINED
59. Badger : TORMENT
60. Bears witness (to) : ATTESTS
62. Personal bearing : MIEN
63. Hosp. areas : ORS
64. Common ID : SSN
65. “Hit the road!” : SCRAM!
67. Sugar in much corn syrup : FRUCTOSE
68. Celt’s land : EIRE
69. Actress Salazar of “Maze Runner” movies : ROSA
72. Venerable letters in global news : UPI
74. Glass-aloft salutation : CHEERS!
77. Smallest Canadian prov. : PEI
78. Place to stay : INN
79. Belief : TENET
80. Con __: tempo marking : MOTO
81. Many a freshman : TEEN
82. Sporty VW : GTI
83. Designer Gernreich : RUDI
84. Gavel wielders : JURISTS
85. Extraordinary : UNUSUAL
86. Unlikely banquet setting : DINETTE
88. Wrong : IN ERROR
93. Legal tender substitute : SCRIP
94. Target of suburban cleanups : LEAVES
95. Respectful gesture : SALUTE
97. Approaches : NEARS
98. Negotiations : TALKS
99. Expunge : ERASE
100. D.C. athlete : NAT
102. 28-Down’s opposite : LOSER
103. Kitchen equipment : OVENS
104. Proficiency determiner : TEST
108. Shore bird : TERN
111. Like two-thirds of Austria’s flag : RED
113. Dominique’s thirst quencher : EAU
114. 15-season show whose final episode was “Immortality” : CSI
115. Driving need: Abbr. : LIC
116. Propose, in a way : ASK

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11 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 7 Oct 18, Sunday”

  1. LAT: 24:55, no errors; got “CTA” using crosses, but afterwards had to look up what it meant (duh) in order to understand the “irony” involved. Newsday: 24:55, no errors. No further progress on Friday’s WSJ meta (and I probably won’t have time to look at it today … but we’ll see 😜).

  2. 36:27. Gareth Bain then Jeffrey Wechsler – quite a one-two punch. Got the theme and found it amusing. I even used it some this time.

    FRACTALS and ABSCISSA from yesterday. All these terms from math class years ago. It got me to remember all the arithmetic terms:
    augend + addend = sum
    minuend – subtrahend = difference
    multiplicand x multiplier = product
    dividend / divisor = quotient

    Anyone remember these? Now it’s off to do the NYT.

    Best –

    1. Jeff– LOL! 😀 I do remember a few of these, from Catholic grammar school! I’d forgotten “minuend,” which is surprising because it is just such a weird word! Thanks for the reminders!🙃

  3. No errors. Getting the theme early was crucial for a quick, enjoyable solve. CTA puzzled me until I read Bill’s explanation. Actually I think I had had that entry at least once before. I’ll try not to forget it again. It is an excellent clue and answer for the type of posers that make crossword puzzles so interesting.

  4. That was a fun one.
    I had Aries before Orion.
    Had to get RELATIVE-what? on the crosses. It’s been a ver-rry long time since high school.

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