LA Times Crossword 10 Nov 18, Saturday

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Constructed by: C.C. Burnikel
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: None

Bill’s time: 8m 19s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Cheese manufacturing by-product : WHEY

When milk curdles it separates into two parts, the solid curds and the liquid whey.

5. 2017 events for SNAP and Blue Apron : IPOS

Snapchat is a messaging system that allows users to send photos and video clips to a limited list of recipients. The photos and clips, called “snaps”, can be viewed for only a few seconds before they are deleted from the recipient’s device, and from the Snapchat servers.

13. Green feature : HOLE

That would be golf.

14. Soup bar staple : MINESTRONE

Minestrone is a hearty Italian soup with varying ingredients, but usually including lots of vegetables in a vegetable broth with added pasta or rice. The term “minestrone” comes from the Italian “minestrare” meaning “to serve”.

17. Dwarf planet named for a Greek goddess : ERIS

In Greek mythology, Eris was the goddess of discord. The name “Eris” is derived from the Greek word for strife, and translates into Latin as “Discordia”. In Greek her counterpart was Harmonia, and in the world of the Roman gods, Concordia. The largest dwarf planet in our solar system is called Eris, named after the goddess.

18. Annual awards for which many adolescents vote : TEEN CHOICE

Fox television network’s Teen Choice Awards were created in 1999 to cater for the teen demographic, along the lines of the existing Nickelodeon Kids’ Choice Awards. Sadly, the Teen Choice Awards have been plagued with controversy, with apparently well-founded claims that winners have been selected and sometimes notified even before voting has closed.

19. “Do I dare to eat a peach?” poet : TS ELIOT

“The Love Song of J Alfred Prufrock”, the famous poem by T. S. Eliot, includes the line “Do I dare to eat a peach?”

“The Lovesong of J. Alfred Prufrock” is a poem by T. S. Eliot that was first published in 1915. The rather odd name of “Prufrock” seems to have just come to Eliot, although there was a Prufrock-Littau Company in St. Louis while he lived there.

24. Grafton’s “__ for Alibi” : A IS

Sue Grafton wrote detective novels, and her “alphabet series” feature the private investigator Kinsey Millhone. She started off with “A Is for Alibi” in 1982 and worked her way up to “U is for Undertow” before she passed away in 2017.

25. Oceanus, for one : TITAN

Oceanus was a mythical figure and the personification of the enormous river that the ancient Greeks and Romans believed encircled the world. It is from the name “Oceanus” that we get out modern term “Ocean”.

The Titans were a group of twelve older deities in Greek mythology, the twelve children of the primordial Gaia and Uranus, Mother Earth and Father Sky. In the celebrated Battle of the Titans, they were overthrown by the Olympians, who were twelve younger gods. We use the term “titan” figuratively to describe a powerful person, someone with great influence.

26. Shot in a tiny cup : ESPRESSO

Espresso is made by forcing extremely hot water, under pressure, through finely ground coffee beans. The result is a thick and concentrated coffee drink, which contains quite a lot of solids and a lot of foam. An espresso machine was first patented in 1884 in Italy, although it was a machine to make the beverage in bulk. The first patent for a machine that made individual measures was applied for in 1901, also in Italy.

33. “Rich Man, Poor Man” novelist : SHAW

Irwin Shaw was an author from New York City. Shaw’s most famous works were his novels “The Young Lions” (1948) and “Rich Man, Poor Man” (1970). The former was made into a successful 1958 film of the same starring Marlon Brando, Montgomery Clift and Dean Martin. The latter became a successful TV miniseries of the same name starring Peter Strauss and Nick Nolte.

39. “This other __, demi-paradise”: Shak. : EDEN

Here are some famous lines from William Shakespeare’s “Richard II”.

This royal throne of kings, this sceptred isle,
This earth of majesty, this seat of Mars,
This other Eden, demi-paradise,
This fortress built by Nature for herself
Against infection and the hand of war,
This happy breed of men, this little world,
This precious stone set in the silver sea,
Which serves it in the office of a wall
Or as a moat defensive to a house,
Against the envy of less happier lands,
This blessed plot, this earth, this realm, this England.

41. Obsessed mariner : AHAB

Captain Ahab is the obsessed and far from friendly captain of the Pequod in Herman Melville’s “Moby-Dick”. The role of Captain Ahab was played by Gregory Peck in the 1956 John Huston film adaptation. Patrick Stewart played Ahab in a 1998 miniseries in which Peck made another appearance, as Father Mapple.

42. Like sea lions : EARED

There are three families of seals. The first is the walrus family, the second the eared seals (like sea lions), and thirdly the earless seals (like elephant seals).

46. Data breach causes : HACKS

A computer hacker is a computer expert, and in particular one who uses that expertise to solve problems with hardware and software. So, the original use of the term “hacking” was very positive. Since the 1980s, the term “hacker” is more commonly used for an expert in subverting computer security.

48. Small two-seater : SMART CAR

“smart cars” are manufactured by Daimler AG, the same company that makes Mercedes-Benz automobiles. The smart car was developed in cooperation with the wristwatch brand Swatch. The name “smart” (always in lowercase letters) stands for Swatch Mercedes ART.

56. Rash-causing shrubs : POISON OAKS

Two of the plants that are most painful to humans are poison oak and poison ivy. Poison oak is mainly found west of the Rocky Mountains, and poison ivy to the east.

63. Body shop figs. : ESTS

Estimate (est.)

Down

1. Sharpens : WHETS

The words “whet” and “pique” can both be used in the sense of sharpening or awaking one’s interest or desire.

2. Shrewd bargain : HORSE TRADE

“David Harum” by Edward Noyes Westcott was a very successful novel when it was first published in 1899. The book is noted for introducing the colloquial term “horse trading” into the language (meaning “shady business practices”).

3. The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum Award was renamed for him : ELIE WIESEL

Elie Wiesel was a holocaust survivor, and is best known for his book “Night” that tells of his experiences in Auschwitz and Buchenwald. Wiesel was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986. He was also the first recipient of the US Holocaust Memorial Museum Award, which was later renamed the Elie Wiesel Award in his honor.

6. Only work Michelangelo ever signed : PIETA

The Pietà is a representation of the Virgin Mary holding in her arms the dead body of her son Jesus. The most famous Pietà is undoubtedly the sculpted rendition by Michelangelo that is located in St. Peter’s Basilica in Vatican City. That particular sculpture is thought to be the only work that Michelangelo signed. In some depictions of the Pietà, Mary and her son are surrounded by other figures from the New Testament. Such depictions are known as Lamentations.

The celebrated Italian Renaissance artist and poet Michelangelo was born Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni in a village near Arezzo in the present-day province of Tuscany. Michelangelo achieved renown during his own lifetime. He was the first Western artist to see his biography published during his own lifetime.

9. Mass symbols : CROSSES

The principal act of worship in the Roman Catholic tradition is the Mass. The term “Mass” comes from the Late Latin word “missa” meaning “dismissal”. This word is used at the end of the Latin Mass in “Ite, missa est” which translates literally as “Go, it is the dismissal”.

10. Hi’s wife, in comics : LOIS

“Hi and Lois” is a comic strip that first appeared in 1954 and is still running today. The strip was created by Mort Walker (also known for “Beetle Bailey”) and was originally illustrated by Dik Browne (also known for “Hägar the Horrible”). The title characters Hi and Lois Flagstone first appeared in “Beetle Bailey”. Lois is Beetle’s sister, and the characters occasionally show up in each other’s strip.

16. “__ Eyes Were Watching God”: Hurston novel : THEIR

Zora Neale Hurston was an American author, most famous for her 1937 novel “Their Eyes Were Watching God”. Like the author, the main character in the novel is an African American woman, and a part played by Halle Berry in a television movie adaptation that first aired in 2005.

31. “Believe” singer : CHER

When Cher recorded the 1998 song “Believe”, the audio engineers routinely corrected the sound of Cher’s voice to ensure that all notes were sung with perfect pitch (all singers “cheat”, it seems!). The software that does this pitch correction is called “Auto-Tune”. Then, for a bit of fun, the same engineers played with the Auto-Tune software and created a special effect in her voice that she so liked it was left in the final release. You can easily detect the strange effect if you listen to the song. The process is now called the “Cher Effect” and is used by other artists in their recordings.

32. Court immortal : ASHE

The great American tennis player Arthur Ashe spent the last years of his life writing his memoir called “Days of Grace”. He finished the manuscript just a few days before he passed away, dying from AIDS caused by a tainted blood transfusion.

40. Waterloo : NEMESIS

Nemesis was a Greek goddess, the goddess of retribution. Her role was to make pay those individuals who were either haughty or arrogant. In modern parlance, one’s nemesis (plural “nemeses”) is one’s sworn enemy, often someone who is the exact opposite in character but someone who still shares some important characteristics. A nemesis is often someone one cannot seem to beat in competition.

Waterloo is a small municipality in Belgium. The name “Waterloo” originated with the Dutch and is probably an anglicization of a Dutch word meaning “wet clearing in a forest”. The town is famous for the Battle of Waterloo that took place nearby in 1815. Said battle was fought between the Imperial French army led by Emperor Napoleon, and an Anglo-Allied army led by Irish-born British Field Marshal, the Duke of Wellington. Napoleon’s defeat at Waterloo led to his abdication and the restoration of King Louis XVIII to the throne of France. Bonaparte was exiled to the British-owned island of Saint Helena in the South Atlantic, where he died in 1821. Such is the fame of the battle that the term “Waterloo” is used figuratively today for any decisive or crushing defeat.

45. Alphabetically first Baseball Hall of Famer : AARON

The great Hank Aaron (“Hammerin’ Hank” or “the Hammer”) has many claims to fame. One notable fact is that he is the last major league baseball player to have also played in the Negro League.

49. Powerful sharks : MAKOS

The shortfin mako shark can appear on restaurant menus, and as a result the species is dying out in some parts of the world. The mako gets its own back sometimes though, as attacks on humans are not unknown. It is the fastest-swimming shark, and has been clocked at speeds of over 40 miles/hour. And the shark in Ernest Hemingway’s “The Old Man and the Sea”, that’s a mako. “Mako” is the Maori word for “shark” or “shark tooth”.

53. “Women and Love” author : HITE

Shere Hite is a German sex educator, although she was born in the US. She married German concert pianist Friedrich Höricke in 1985 and renounced her US citizenship in favor of German nationality in the mid-nineties. Hite’s work focuses on sexual experience and what meaning it holds for an individual.

57. Yahoo! sister company : AOL

The telecom giant Verizon acquired AOL in 2015, and Yahoo! in 2017. Just after the latter purchase, Verizon launched Oath, a subsidiary company that served as the umbrella under which AOl and Yahoo! continued to operate. Oath was renamed to Verizon Media Group after a corporate reorganization at the end of 2018.

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Cheese manufacturing by-product : WHEY
5. 2017 events for SNAP and Blue Apron : IPOS
9. Dolt : CLOD
13. Green feature : HOLE
14. Soup bar staple : MINESTRONE
17. Dwarf planet named for a Greek goddess : ERIS
18. Annual awards for which many adolescents vote : TEEN CHOICE
19. “Do I dare to eat a peach?” poet : TS ELIOT
21. Ready to go out : DRESSED
22. Underground rodent : SEWER RAT
24. Grafton’s “__ for Alibi” : A IS
25. Oceanus, for one : TITAN
26. Shot in a tiny cup : ESPRESSO
31. Top : CREST
32. Bar at the garage : AXLE
33. “Rich Man, Poor Man” novelist : SHAW
34. Owns : HAS
35. Bliss : ECSTASY
38. Cold draft, perhaps : ALE
39. “This other __, demi-paradise”: Shak. : EDEN
41. Obsessed mariner : AHAB
42. Like sea lions : EARED
44. Set free : RELEASED
46. Data breach causes : HACKS
47. Welcome sight? : MAT
48. Small two-seater : SMART CAR
51. Herald : USHER IN
55. Soften : ASSUAGE
56. Rash-causing shrubs : POISON OAKS
58. Quite some time : AGES
59. Source of potential matches : DATING POOL
60. Out house? : TENT
61. Vein valuables : ORES
62. “If all __ fails … ” : ELSE
63. Body shop figs. : ESTS

Down

1. Sharpens : WHETS
2. Shrewd bargain : HORSE TRADE
3. The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum Award was renamed for him : ELIE WIESEL
4. “We should!” : YES, LET’S!
5. “Tough decision!” : I’M TORN!
6. Only work Michelangelo ever signed : PIETA
7. Together : ONE
8. Dispatch : SEND
9. Mass symbols : CROSSES
10. Hi’s wife, in comics : LOIS
11. Some time ago : ONCE
12. House document : DEED
15. Tough spots : SCRAPES
16. “__ Eyes Were Watching God”: Hurston novel : THEIR
20. Fit to be tied : IRATE
23. Some online banners : TEXT ADS
27. Big piece : SLAB
28. Divers’ protection : SHARK CAGES
29. Pitcher? : SALES AGENT
30. Outstanding : OWED
31. “Believe” singer : CHER
32. Court immortal : ASHE
36. Certain director’s concern : CASTING
37. Quite some time : YEARS
40. Waterloo : NEMESIS
43. Set in motion : ACTUATE
45. Alphabetically first Baseball Hall of Famer : AARON
46. Major headache : HASSLE
49. Powerful sharks : MAKOS
50. Stops presenting evidence : RESTS
51. Bun, e.g. : UPDO
52. Skyrocket : SOAR
53. “Women and Love” author : HITE
54. “You wish” : NOPE
57. Yahoo! sister company : AOL

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23 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 10 Nov 18, Saturday”

  1. LAT: 11:44, no errors. Uncharacteristically easy, and probably a personal Saturday record for me. WSJ: 18:58, 4 random errors. Scary the time I finished filling this one in at. Newsday: The usual DNF (after 60:00 of trying), but got about 25-30% of the way before I started getting answers that ultimately turned into 12 errors. Usual mix of nonsensical and inaccurate cluing that I really just can’t buy.

    1. @Glenn … What clues in the Newsday puzzle did you think were inaccurate? I thought a lot of them were really (perhaps even outrageously 😜) difficult, but, after the fact, they all make perfect sense to me.

      1. Not all inaccurate, but I’ll go ahead and list all the “problem clues” I had in getting a solve:

        1. 22A: [No hitter of filmdom] – BOND. What? Unless it’s referring to Tommy Bond, a pitcher of over 100 years ago but that’s [insert what you say is hyperbole here], but not sure entirely of 2D. That crossing was a complete total guess.
        2. 24A: [Alternative to Beth] – ELLIE. Never heard of this, and had difficulty finding anything, sans this page, which I think illustrates this is nowhere near a settled equivalency. What I had filled in (“izzie”) caused a lot of errors in things down the puzzle that I would have gotten otherwise and ultimately was what ruined the solve.
        3. 31D: [Ump or ref] – OFFICIATE. I had “officiant”, but I guess these can be taken as verbs too. No real way for me to tell with the crossings there. Insert more “hyperbole” here.
        4. 57A: [21st century gaming accessory] – LASERMOUSE. Inaccurate. It’s not a “gaming accessory”, it’s a sea change in the technology like going from 5 1/4 to 3 1/2 inch floppy drives. (I can’t think you can even buy a track ball mouse anymore.) To be accurate, I wanted “VR headset” there which does fit the clue, but I knew it wasn’t.

        Anyway, a little peek into what I run into when I try to solve these things.

        1. Thanks for responding, Glenn …

          1) “No hitter” refers to “Dr. No” and the answer is “Bond” (as in “James Bond”). The clue fooled me for quite a while, but I got a chuckle out of it when I figured it out.

          2) I have often heard “Ellie” as a nickname for “Elizabeth”, so that came pretty readily to mind, though I had to depend on crosses to verify that it was the correct choice. However, see also this Wikipedia entry for “Ellie” (which does indicate that the usage isn’t as common as I would have guessed).

          3) When I saw “Ump or ref”, the little “verb or noun” warning bell (installed in my head by many years of doing these things) went off instantly, so I wasn’t tricked by it.

          4) Your knowledge of home computer technology greatly exceeds mine, so I won’t argue with your critique of “laser mouse”. I just rummaged around in my head for something attached to my iMac that might be useful if I were a gamer and eventually came up with the answer they wanted. (Sometimes, having more knowledge in a given area than the puzzle constructor or editor can be a disadvantage. I think most crossword puzzle constructors are generalists; it’s not too surprising that they can make errors in specific areas.)

          As I’ve said before, what often gets me through a puzzle is not the kind of encyclopedic knowledge one sees in someone like Ken Jennings or Kim Peek, but the simple fact that all the entries have to fit together in a grid. If a word or a phrase fits and seems to be vaguely connected to the clue, I’m likely to go with it (always reserving the right to change my mind, of course). So, little errors in the clues are quite likely to sneak by me without raising either eyebrow.

          And finally, over all, as I said, that puzzle was a bear! One needn’t feel bad about having trouble with it … 😜

          1. 1. saw that about 15 minutes after I posted the first thing above.
            2. That said, I forgot to mention 4D which wasn’t a help with “Ellie” either, as it was a tense disagreement (Compound being present, blended being past). I tried “blend in” or “blend up”, which probably led me to “izzie” on that one.
            3. A lot of it I think is typical usage. No one I’m aware of actually refers to these things as verbs. But then again, the whole goal of crosswords is to find things that people don’t actually say or do and put them into the puzzle.
            4. They do have Google and things to check these things out. The ironic part of it is that I remember when laser mice came out that the gamer community was the most dead-set against it because it was a more inaccurate technology. Funny how these things work.

            As for your observation, I’m finding that as a similar thought to doing these things, but I’m finding too that I have to have a certain amount of confidence that I’m operating with right answers (if you get what I’m saying) before I can make them fit together.

            FWIW, it took another 25 minutes or so to fill the grid in after I corrected it. Ironically with Croce and this one, I’m not too far away from solving them, but just far enough away at a couple of points that they aren’t.

          2. About 4D: Both “compound” and “blended” can be used as adjectives (as in “compound interest”, “compound verb”, “blended family”, “blended whiskey”, etc.) and have essentially the same meaning (though I’ll admit that it’s a little difficult to come up with a single noun that works with both, as the combinations tend to be idiomatic). I guess the alarm bell in my head is not just a “noun or verb” bell, but a “part of speech” bell 😜.

            Maybe this is obvious, but … when I’m doing a really hard puzzle, I do it on paper and I don’t write much of anything in the grid until I’m pretty sure that it fits with something else. Instead, I write in possible answers next to key clues and wait for a section to begin to “gel” in my mind. Sometimes, then, I fill in a whole previously-blank section of the grid all at once. (Of course, once in a while, I write in something I shouldn’t have and have to write over it and, once in a very long while, so many writeovers accumulate that I have to print a new copy and start over.)

            I’m sure that setters and editors use Google and many other references to check out their clues, but I think it’s difficult, when trying to use an entry too far outside one’s own field of real expertise, to get enough of a feel for it to avoid the sort of subtle “wrongness” that one sometimes sees. I sometimes see that in math clues (even though I’m not much of a mathematician any more).

            FWIW, I just did the Croce puzzle from Tuesday, 2018/11/06, and found it relatively easy: I basically worked it pretty smoothly from top to bottom, without my usual jumping around in the grid.

  2. LAT: 11:17, no errors; very easy.

    WSJ: 26:28, no errors, a bit better than my usual performance on WSJ’s Saturday Slog; with a very creative and enjoyable theme (which I only figured out after finishing the puzzle).

    Newsday’s Saturday Stumper: 1:19:28, no errors; one of the hardest puzzles I’ve done recently (even harder than last week’s Erik Agard!), but ultimately doable (and enjoyable).

  3. Well not bad for Saturday. Top right and bottom corner right, gave me a little trouble. I had hones for 1 down, so that screwed that area up. Got it fixed. Then 55 across assuage, had to change some things around that area also. Took awhile but it worked out. Good for my brainpan.

  4. 33 min. and no errors.
    For me to finish in 33 min. it must be easy for a Saturday .
    I thought ecstasy was spelled TACY. I learned something new.

  5. Yes, it must have been easy today, as I finished it! But miss read “diver” as “driver” so was thinking car all that time. (I must get these cataracts taken care of soon.)

  6. Not too bad for a Saturday puzzle, nevertheless I had several issues with the bottom left hand corner. Frustrated I took a break and went out to the garage and put back together my chainsaw which wouldn’t start. That was a problem I worked on and off for three days. An hour later and a tank of fresh fuel plus three pulls it was running like new again. Came inside washed up and tossed the unfinished puzzle in the recycle bin.
    Eddie ~:>)

  7. I was all set to brag on our team (the wife, son-in-law and me) having no
    errors and no omissions on a Saturday puzzle, First time ever. Even if
    almost everyone who finished it and commented on it found it to be very
    easy, our result was very satisfying, indeed. Kudos to Bill et al and have a
    good weekend.

  8. 13:20. Late again today but not as late as yesterday. As all of the above noted, it was a pretty easy Saturday grid. I’m fine with that after the shellacking I took over at the NYT today (44 minutes with several cheats).

    The first time I saw a SMART CAR was in Paris. It made sense there as it made parking in small spaces much easier than for most people – ie it made finding a parking space easier. I don’t understand their appeal over here in the U.S. though. I’m sure people are attracted to them for some reason.

    Onward to the Sundays –

    Best –

  9. Carrie – are you in the fire areas? Don’t know if you are east or west valley. I’m in the basin but got major smoke/smell today because of the on shore wind. Hope you are OK.

    1. Hi Kay! Thanks — I’m good, and glad you are too!😊 I actually live not in the Valley but in Los Feliz, so I’m close to Griffith Park. A few small fires there, but NOTHING like what the West Valley is dealing with!! Yet we do have the smell of smoke and the eerie light. Stay safe!

  10. 15 mins seconds, and one “misspelling” caused an error where AXLE and TEXT ADS cross. I thought the down fill was “TEST ADS” and didn’t check the other one. Totally my fault.

  11. Moderately difficult Saturday for me; took about an hour, but mostly out of respect, with no errors.

    Had to fix my spelling of Wiesel and change SnoRK… to SHARK… Still, everything was pretty fair and mostly easy. I was just being overly careful.

    Still pretty smokey up here, with the wind bringing the smoke directly to the bay area, and cold too. Hope you guys down south are doing okay. Poor Thousand Oaks, with two disasters in two days!

  12. Greetings!🙃

    No errors on an easy Saturday. A fun solve. Almost didn’t do today’s grid, but I took a look and it seemed approachable.

    The SE corner was tricky; I had ORCAS before MAKOS and I tried to work in MASSAGE where ASSUAGE went. 😮

    Now, can anyone tell me where there’s a DATING POOL in my area??!!😆

    Be well ~~🥀🌻🌺

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