LA Times Crossword 11 Nov 18, Sunday

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Constructed by: Patti Varol
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Hunger Games

Themed answers are each common phrases that have been reinterpreted as something that might be uttered by a HUNGRY professional:

  • 23A. A hungry actor might __ : CHEW THE SCENERY
  • 30A. A hungry film critic might __ : TAKE IN A MOVIE
  • 53A. A hungry locksmith might __ : BOLT THE DOOR
  • 68A. A hungry librarian might __ : DEVOUR A GOOD BOOK
  • 89A. A hungry janitor might __ : BITE THE DUST
  • 107A. A hungry banker might __ : DOWN PAYMENTS
  • 120A. A hungry angler might __ : SWALLOW THE BAIT

Bill’s time: 15m 08s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Comfy cover-up : CAFTAN

A kaftan (also “caftan”) is long robe associated for thousands of years with Islamic cultures.

11. Elemental variant : ISOTOPE

An isotope is a variant of an element. All isotopes of an element have the same number of protons and electrons, but not the same number of neutrons. This means that isotopes of an element have different atomic weights. The term “isotope” was coined in 1913, and translates from Greek “having the same place”. The idea is that isotopes may have different atomic weights, but they occupy the same place in the periodic table.

22. Land at Mexico City Airport? : TIERRA

Mexico City International Airport is the nation’s busiest airport, and has been operating at capacity for several years now. Because of capacity restrictions, a lot of traffic now goes through nearby Toluca International Airport, especially what is considered low-cost carrier traffic. Concrete plans to replace Mexico City International were shelved at the end of 2018 after voters rejected the project in a referendum.

23. A hungry actor might __ : CHEW THE SCENERY

To chew the scenery is to overact, to ham it up.

25. Poison sumac exposure risk : ITCH

Sumacs are a group of flowering shrubs and small trees that includes poison oak, poison ivy and poison sumac (nasty stuff!). The leaves of some species of sumac contain tannins that are used for tanning leather. Morocco leather is an example of the use of sumac tannins.

26. Nonstick cookware brand : T-FAL

Tefal (also “T-Fal”) is a French manufacturer of cookware, famous for its nonstick line. The name “Tefal” is a portmanteau, of TEFlon and ALuminum, the key materials used in producing their pots and pans.

28. “It matters how you get there” app : LYFT

Lyft is a ridesharing service that is based in San Francisco, as is Uber, Lyft’s biggest competitor.

29. Dollars for quarters : RENTS

We use the term “quarters” for a place of abode, especially housing for military personnel. Back in the late 16th century, quarters were a portion (quarter) of a town reserved for a military force.

34. Compote component : FRUIT

A compote is a fruit mixture stewed in syrup. The word “compote” comes to us from French and has the same etymology as our word “compost”! “Composte” is an Old French word for “mixture”.

39. Bird feeder food : SUET

Fat, when extracted from the carcass of an animal, is called suet. Untreated suet decomposes at room temperature quite easily so it has to be rendered or purified to make it stable. Rendered fat from pigs is what we call lard. Rendered beef or mutton fat is known as tallow.

48. Subjects of the film “Blackfish” : ORCAS

“Blackfish” is a 2013 documentary film that examines the dangers of keeping orca in captivity. ”Star” of the movie is a killer whale (orca) named Tilikum who was responsible in whole or in part for the deaths of three people. Tilikum was captured in 1983 and has been a “guest” of SeaWorld since 1992. Most recently, Tilikum killed a 40-year old trainer named Dawn Brancheau in 2010.

50. Music-licensing org. : BMI

ASCAP (the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers) collects licence fees for musicians and distributes royalties to composers whose works have been performed. BMI (Broadcast Music Incorporated) provides the same service.

51. Not quite right : AMISS

Something that is amiss is “off the mark”, or more literally “on the miss”.

56. Pentagon address : SIR

The incredible building known as the Pentagon was built during WWII, and dedicated on January 15, 1943. It is the largest office building in the world (by floor space) covering an area of about 6.5 million square feet. As it was built during the war years, a major requirement was that it use a minimum amount of steel. That steel shortage dictated that the building be no more than four stories in height, and hence cover an awful lot of real estate.

57. Clever barb response : OH SNAP!

“Oh snap!” might be described as street talk. The phrase is used as a retort to someone who makes a verbal dig at you. It was apparently popularized by Tracy Morgan on “Saturday Night Live”.

60. Loch with a mystery : NESS

The Loch Ness monster has been talked about for centuries, but modern interest started in 1933 when a spate of sightings was reported. Those sightings don’t seem to have stopped, with photographs really sparking the imagination.

62. Cartoon desert island sight : TREE

The word “cartoon” was originally used for a “drawing on strong paper”, a durable drawing used as a model for a work of art. The term comes from the French word “carton” meaning “heavy paper, pasteboard”. Cartoons have been around a long time, with some of the most famous having being drawn by Leonardo da Vinci.

64. Passé : OLD

“Passé” is a French word, meaning “past, faded”. We’ve imported the term into English, and use it in the same sense.

73. Cherry-topped dish : SUNDAE

There’s a lot of speculation about how the dessert called a sundae got its name, but there seems to be agreement that it is an alteration of the word “Sunday”.

76. Venerable English school : ETON

Eton College near Windsor in the south of England was founded way back in 1440 by King Henry VI. Originally known as “The King’s College of Our Lady of Eton besides Wyndsor”, the school was intended to provided free education to poor boys. Free education today at Eton? Not so much …

77. Dinghy need : OAR

Our word “dinghy” comes from the Hindi “dingi”, a word meaning “small boat”.

78. “Thor: Ragnarok” actor Idris : ELBA

The English actor Idris Elba is probably best known in North America for playing the drug lord Stringer Bell in the marvelous HBO drama series “The Wire”, and the title character in the 2013 film “Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom”. Off the screen, Elba occasionally appears as a disk jockey using the name “DJ Big Driis”.

“Thor: Ragnarok” is a 2017 superhero film in the “Thor” series. Not my cup of tea …

83. Bouquet bearer : VASE

“Bouquet” comes from the French word for “bunch” in the sense of “bunch of flowers”. In French, the term is derived from an older word describing a little wood or small grove of trees.

85. Mariano Rivera, memorably : YANKEE

Mariano Rivera is a professional baseball pitcher from Panama City. Rivera played for the New York Yankees from 1995 until his retirement at the end of the 2013 season. Rivera holds the league record for the most career saves (at 652).

88. Alley in comics : OOP

“Alley Oop” is a comic strip that ran for four decades starting in 1932. “Alley Oop” was drawn by V. T. Hamlin. The title character lived in the prehistoric kingdom of Moo, although for much of the strip’s life, Alley Oop had access to a time machine. Alley Oop also had a girlfriend called Ooola. I had assumed that Ooola’s name was a play on “hula hoop”, but that wasn’t invented until the 1950s (a kind blog reader informs me) …

89. A hungry janitor might __ : BITE THE DUST

A janitor is someone who takes care of the maintenance or cleaning of a building. An older definition of the term is “doorman”. Our word comes from the Latin “ianitor” meaning “doorkeeper”.

93. Curved plumbing piece : P-TRAP

Most sinks in a home have a P-trap in the outlet pipe that empties into the sewer line. This P-trap has at its heart a U-bend that retains a small amount of water after the sink is emptied. This plug of water serves as a seal to prevent sewer gases entering into the home. By virtue of its design, the U-bend can also capture any heavy objects (like an item of jewelry) that might fall through the plughole. But the “trapping” of fallen objects is secondary to the P-trap’s main function of trapping sewer gases.

96. Monopoly buy : HOTEL

In the game of Monopoly, one can purchase a hotel by “demolishing” four houses and by paying an extra amount equal to the price of one house.

97. Somber notice : OBIT

Our word “obituary” comes from the Latin “obituaris”. The Latin term was used for “record of the death of a person”, although the literal meaning is “pertaining to death”.

99. CafePress purchase : T-SHIRT

CafePress is an online retailer that specializes in supplying user-customized items, items such as t-shirts, bags, clocks, mugs and calendars.

102. Kellogg’s toaster pastry : POP-TART

Pop-Tart is the most successful single brand for the Kellogg company, as millions of the sugary treats are sold every year. The US Military bought quite a few in 2001, and dropped 2.4 million Pop-Tarts into Afghanistan during the invasion after 9/11.

104. Philistine : BOOR

Back in the early 1500s, a boor was a rustic person, a peasant farmer, someone associated with the countryside. The term “boor” ultimately comes from the Latin “bos” meaning “cow, ox”. By the mid-1500s, someone described as boorish was considered rude in manner, which is our usage today.

124. Lanai furniture material : RATTAN

Rattan is the name of a large number of species of palms, all of which look less like trees and more like vines. The woody stems are used for making cane furniture.

A lanai is a type of veranda, and a design that originated in Hawaii. A kind blog reader tells me that the etymology of “lanai” seems unclear, but that the island name of “Lana’i” is not related.

126. “One man’s struggle to take it easy,” for “Ferris Bueller” : TAG LINE

Here are some of my favorite movie tag lines:

  • “Check in, Unpack, Relax, Take a Shower” from “Psycho” (1998)
  • “In space no one can hear you scream” from “Alien” (1979)
  • “You don’t get to 500 million friends without making a few enemies” from “The Social Network” (2010)
  • “The first casualty of war is innocence” from “Platoon” (1986)
  • “This is Benjamin. He’s a little worried about his future” from “The Graduate” (1967)
  • “This is the weekend they didn’t play golf” from “Deliverance” (1972)
  • “Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water” from “Jaws 2” (1978)
  • “Be afraid. Be very afraid” from “The Fly” (1986)
  • “Yule crack up” from “Christmas Vacation” (1989)
  • “For Harry and Lloyd, every day is a no-brainer” (1994)

130. Actress Falco : EDIE

The actress Edie Falco won three Emmy Awards for playing Carmela Soprano on HBO’s outstanding drama series called “The Sopranos”. Falco also won an Emmy in 2010 for playing the title role in “Nurse Jackie”, an excellent black comedy.

Down

2. Singer Baker : ANITA

Anita Baker is an R&B and soul singer who was raised in Detroit, Michigan. Baker’s most successful song is the Grammy-winning “Sweet Love” released in 1986.

3. 14-time Grammy-winning banjoist Béla : FLECK

Béla Fleck is a banjo player who performed with the band’s New Grass Revival and Béla Fleck and the Flecktones. Fleck was born in New York City and was given the name Béla Anton Leoš Fleck. He was named after Hungarian composer Béla Bartók, Austrian composer Anton Webern, and Czech composer Leoš Janáček. That’s quite a name to live up to, but by all accounts Fleck is one of the most technically proficient banjo players the world has ever known.

4. North Carolina team : TAR HEELS

“Tar Heel” is a nickname for anyone living in, or from, the state of North Carolina. As such, it is the also nickname for an athlete of the University of North Carolina (UNC). No one seems to know for sure where the term “Tar Heel” originated, but it is thought to be related to the historical importance of the tar, pitch and turpentine industries that thrived in the state due to the presence of vast forests of pine trees.

5. Unlike this ans. : ACR

This isn’t an across (acr.) answer (ans.).

7. Mexican painter Frida : KAHLO

Frida Kahlo was a Mexican painter who was famous for her self-portraits. She was married to the equally famous artist Diego Rivera. Kahlo was portrayed by the actress Salma Hayek in a film about her colorful life called “Frida” released in 2002.

9. Chapel bench : PEW

A pew is a bench in a church, one usually with a high back. The original pews were raised and sometimes enclosed seats in the church used by women and important men or families. “Pew” comes from the Old French “puie” meaning “balcony, elevation”.

12. A behavioral sci. : SOC

Sociology (soc.)

13. Ferrell’s “SNL” cheerleading partner : OTERI

Cheri Oteri was the SNL (“Saturday Night Live”) cast member who regularly appeared with Will Ferrell in the skit featuring a pair of Spartan cheerleaders.

14. Guiding principles : TENETS

A tenet is an article of faith, something that is held to be true. “Tenet” is Latin for “he holds”.

17. “Grand” ice cream brand : EDY’S

Dreyers’ ice cream sells its products under the name Dreyers in the Western United States, and Edy’s in the Eastern states. The company’s founders were William Dreyer and Joseph Edy.

19. Ponzi scheme, e.g. : SCAM

Charles Ponzi was born in Luigi, Italy in 1882 and arrived in the US in 1903, flat broke having gambled away all his money on the voyage to Boston. Ponzi devised a scheme to buy what were known as “international reply coupons” through friends in Italy, which he had sent to him in the US so that he could redeem them on this side of the Atlantic. As the value in the US was greater than that in Italy, he could make a handsome profit. This was in itself an “illegal” transaction, buying an asset in one market at a low price, then immediately selling it in another market at a higher price. But it’s what he did next that became known as a Ponzi Scheme. He couldn’t redeem his coupons quickly enough due to red tape so he approached other investors, initially friends, and had them give him cash so that he could buy more coupons in Italy. He promised the investors he would double their money, which they did initially. Many people wanted to get in on the scheme seeing that Ponzi was able to make the new investors a profit and double the money of the original investors. Eventually, somebody did the math and word started to get out that the investment was risky, so the number of new investors started to fall. Without sufficient new investors Ponzi couldn’t double the money of his latest investors, and the whole scheme unraveled.

20. Psalm pronoun : THY

The Greek word “psalmoi” originally meant “songs sung to a harp”, and gave us the word “psalms”. In the Jewish and Western Christian traditions, the Book of Psalms contains 150 individual psalms, divided into five sections.

27. Oft-chewed item : FAT

Back in the day, a wealthy man would “bring home the bacon”, and sit around with guests “chewing the fat”.

32. TiVo predecessor : VCR

Video Cassette Recorder (VCR)

TiVo was introduced in 1999 and was the world’s first commercially successful Digital Video Recorder (DVR).

33. Foot that’s part of a meter : IAMB

An iamb is a metrical foot containing an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable. The lines in Robert Frost’s “Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening” use four sequential iambs, e.g. “Whose woods / these are / I think / I know”. With that sequence of four iambs, the poem’s structure is described as iambic tetrameter.

In poetry, a foot is the natural unit of stressed and unstressed syllables which make up the work. For example, an iambic foot consists of an unstressed syllable, followed by a stressed syllable.

35. Four Corners state : UTAH

The Four Corners region of the US surrounds the meeting point of the four states of Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona and Utah. The Four Corners is the only point in the US that is shared by four states.

38. City on Lake Erie : TOLEDO

Toledo, Ohio lies in the northwest of the state, at the western end of Lake Erie. Toledo was founded as a result of the prosperity that hit the area when the Miami and Erie Canal was constructed in the 19th century connecting Cincinnati to the Great Lakes. Toledo is known as the Glass City as several glass companies originated there, including Owens Corning and Pilkington North America. There is a large exhibition of glass art at the Toledo Museum of Art.

40. WWII sub : U-BOAT

The term “U-boat” comes from the German “Unterseeboot” (undersea boat). U-boats were primarily used in WWII to enforce a blockade against enemy commercial shipping, with a main objective being to cut off the supplies being transported to Britain from the British colonies and the US. The epic fight for control of the supply routes became known as the Battle of the Atlantic.

43. Ramadan ritual : FAST

Ramadan is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar, and is traditionally a period of fasting. The faithful who observe Ramadan refrain from eating, drinking and sexual relations from dawn to dusk everyday, a lesson in patience, humility and spirituality.

44. Abu Dhabi dignitary : EMIR

Abu Dhabi is one of the seven Emirates that make up the federation known as the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The two largest members of the UAE (geographically) are Dubai and Abu Dhabi, the only two of the seven members that have veto power over UAE policy. Before 1971, the UAE was a British Protectorate, a collection of sheikdoms. The sheikdoms entered into a maritime truce with Britain in 1835, after which they became known as the Trucial States, derived from the word “truce”.

45. Name on Irish euros : EIRE

“Éire”, is the Irish word for “Ireland”. The related “Erin” is an anglicized version of “Éire” and actually corresponds to “Éirinn”, the dative case of “Éire”.

The Euro is the official currency of most of the states in the European Union, but not all. The list of EU states not using the Euro includes the UK, Denmark and Sweden.

46. Veda reader : HINDU

The Vedas are a body of ancient Indian texts, the oldest Hindu scriptures. The word “véda” is Sanskrit, and means “knowledge, wisdom”.

47. Resembling : A LA

The phrase “in the style of” can be translated in “alla” in Italian and “à la” in French.

49. Omega rival : SEIKO

Seiko Epson is a Japanese company, and one of the largest manufacturers of printers in the world. The company has its roots in the watch business, roots that go back to 1942. Seiko was chosen as the official timekeeper for the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo and was asked to supply a timer that produced a printed record. This request brought Seiko into the business of printer production. The company developed the world’s first mini-printer for the 1964 Games and called it EP-101 (EP standing for Electronic Printer). In 1975 Seiko introduced the next generation of EP printers which was called EPSON, from “SON of EP”. Cute, huh?

Omega is a manufacturer of high-end watches based in Switzerland. An Omega watch was the first portable timepiece to make it to the moon.

52. Capital north of Berlin : OSLO

The Norwegian capital of Oslo is located at the northern end of a fjord known as Oslofjord. The fjord is home to 40 islands that lie within the city’s limits. Oslo also has 343 lakes.

54. Like some bagels : ONIONY

The bagel was invented in the Polish city of Kraków in the 16th century. Bagels were brought to this country by Jewish immigrants from Poland who mainly established homes in and around New York City.

55. Pond papa : DRAKE

A male duck is a drake, and a female duck is a hen. That said, a female is sometimes just referred to as a duck!

58. Stopped at sea, with “to” : HOVE

A sailing vessel that is “hove to” is pointed into the wind, with the foresail “backed” so that it tries to push the bow away from the wind. At the same time, the mainsail works to push the bow into the wind. The end result is that the vessel remains relatively stationary. Another technique used to stop a sailboat is to “lie to”. A vessel “lying to” is usually pointed about 45-degrees off the wind, with the sails let loose, just flapping.

59. Chatters : PRATES

To prate is to talk idly and at length, and is a word that comes to us from the Middle Dutch “praten”, meaning “to talk or chatter”.

63. Terrier on “Frasier” : EDDIE

Eddie is a Jack Russell terrier who is a character in the hit sitcom “Frasier”. Over the show’s run, Eddie was first played by a dog called Moose, and was eventually replaced by Moose’s son Enzo.

73. Pulitzer-winning Ferber novel : SO BIG

“So Big” is a Pulitzer-winning novel by Edna Ferber that was first published in 1924. The book follows the life of Dutch-American Selina Peake De Jong, who is a character inspired by real-life immigrant Antje Paarlberg. In the story, De Jong has a child who she nicknames “So Big”, from the kiddy-talk “How big is baby” … “So-o-o-o big!” The novel has been adapted for the big screen several times. Barbara Stanwyck played the lead in a 1932 film, and Jane Wyman in 1953.

79. Actress Petty of “Orange Is the New Black” : LORI

Lori Petty is the actress who played the character Kit Keller in the fabulous movie “A League of Their Own”. Petty also played the title role in a 1995 science fiction film called “Tank Girl”.

“Orange Is the New Black” is a very entertaining comedy-drama series made by Netflix about an upper middle-class woman who goes to jail for a drug-related offense committed ten years earlier, in her youth. The series is based on a memoir by Piper Kerman called “Orange Is the New Black: My Year in a Women’s Prison”.

83. Naysayer’s weapon? : VETO POWER

The verb “veto” comes directly from Latin and means “I forbid”. The term was used by tribunes of Ancient Rome to indicate that they opposed measures passed by the Senate.

86. Often-seared tuna : AHI

Yellowfin and bigeye tuna are usually marketed as “ahi”, the Hawaiian name. They are both big fish, with yellowfish tuna often weighing over 300 pounds, and bigeye tuna getting up to 400 pounds.

87. English Derby town : EPSOM

The Surrey town of Epsom in England is most famous for its racecourse (Epsom Downs), at which is run the Epsom Derby every year, one of the three races that make up the English Triple Crown. We also come across “Epsom salts” from time to time. Epsom salt is magnesium sulfate, originally prepared by boiling down mineral waters. Epsom was indeed a spa town at one time. The town is also home to Epsom College, an English “public school” (which actually means “private, and expensive”). One of Epsom’s “old boys” was the Hollywood actor Stewart Granger.

90. Last element in Pandora’s box : HOPE

According to Greek mythology, Pandora was the first woman. She was created by the gods, with each god bestowing on her a gift. Her name can be translated from Greek as “all-gifted”. Pandora is famous for the story of “Pandora’s Box”. In actual fact, the story should be about Pandora’s “Jar” as a 16th-century error in translation created a “box” out of the “jar”. In the story of Pandora’s Box, curiosity got the better of her and she opened up a box she was meant to leave alone. As a result she released all the evils of mankind, just closing it in time to trap hope inside.

91. Lawn-Boy parent company : TORO

Toro is a manufacturer of mainly lawn mowers and snow removal equipment based in Bloomington, Minnesota. The company was founded in 1914 to build tractor engines.

The first Lawn-Boy mower was introduced in 1934 by the Evinrude Company. They have been produced by the Toro Company since 1989.

98. Texter’s “Oh, and another thing … ” : BTW …

By the way (BTW)

99. Geoffrey the Giraffe’s store : TOYS “R” US

Geoffrey the Giraffe (formerly “Dr. G. Raffe”) is the mascot of the Toys “R” Us store. Dr. G. Raffe made his debut in 1957 in an advertising campaign for Children’s Bargain Town. Raffe’s catchphrase was ‘Toys “R” us’. The catchphrase became so popular, that the Children’s Bargain Town changed its name in 1969.

101. River racers : SCULLS

A scull is a boat used for competitive rowing. The main hull of the boat is often referred to as a shell. Crew members who row the boat can be referred to as “oars”. And, a scull is also an oar mounted on the stern of a small boat. It’s all very confusing …

104. Carlsbad Caverns dweller : BAT

Carlsbad Cavern is the show cave in Carlsbad Caverns National Park in southeastern New Mexico. The chamber called the Big Room in Carlsbad Cavern is the fifth largest underground chamber in North America. It is estimated that a million bats live in the park’s cave systems.

109. Party spread : PATE

Pâté is a rich spreadable paste made up of a mixture of ground meat and fat, to which various vegetables, herbs and spices may be added. The most famous version of the paste is pâté de foie gras, which is made from the fattened livers of geese (“foie gras” means “fat liver” in French).

110. __-Grain: breakfast bar brand : NUTRI

The Nutri-Grain brand of breakfast foods is made by Kellogg. The brand was actually introduced first in Australia in 1981.

112. Baseball Hall of Famer Koufax : SANDY

Sandy Koufax is a retired baseball pitcher for the Dodgers from 1955 to 1966. Koufax was the first player to win three Cy Young Awards, and the first player to pitch four no-hitters. He was also an iconic Jewish American in the field of sports, notably refusing to play in the first game of the 1965 World Series because it fell on Yom Kippur. When Koufax was invited to attend a White House reception in honor of Jewish American Heritage Month in 2010, President Obama remarked that he and Kofax had something in common. The president continued, “He can’t pitch on Yom Kippur. I can’t pitch.” Funny …

114. Adult cygnet : SWAN

An adult male swan is a cob, and an adult female is a pen. Young swans are swanlings or cygnets.

115. Herb used in turkey dressing : SAGE

In Britain, sage is listed as one of the four essential herbs. And those would be “parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme”.

123. “Moonlight” Oscar winner Mahershala __ : ALI

Mahershala Ali is an actor and sometime rapper. Among the more memorable roles Ali has had are lobbyist Remy Danton in TV’s “House of Cards”, and Colonel Boggs in “The Hunger Games” series of movies. He also won a Best Supporting Actor Oscar for playing Juan in the 2016 drama “Moonlight”.

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Comfy cover-up : CAFTAN
7. Didn’t toss : KEPT
11. Elemental variant : ISOTOPE
18. Loosen, in a way : UNLACE
19. “Spare me your excuses” : SAVE IT
21. Spot for doodles : NOTEPAD
22. Land at Mexico City Airport? : TIERRA
23. A hungry actor might __ : CHEW THE SCENERY
25. Poison sumac exposure risk : ITCH
26. Nonstick cookware brand : T-FAL
28. “It matters how you get there” app : LYFT
29. Dollars for quarters : RENTS
30. A hungry film critic might __ : TAKE IN A MOVIE
34. Compote component : FRUIT
36. Polish literature? : EDIT
37. Exile : CAST OUT
39. Bird feeder food : SUET
43. “How you holdin’ up?” : FEEL OK?
46. “No __ done” : HARM
48. Subjects of the film “Blackfish” : ORCAS
50. Music-licensing org. : BMI
51. Not quite right : AMISS
52. Some is changed regularly : OIL
53. A hungry locksmith might __ : BOLT THE DOOR
56. Pentagon address : SIR
57. Clever barb response : OH SNAP!
60. Loch with a mystery : NESS
61. Seriously ticked : IRATE
62. Cartoon desert island sight : TREE
64. Passé : OLD
65. Special forces mission : RAID
67. Competed using blades : SKATED
68. A hungry librarian might __ : DEVOUR A GOOD BOOK
73. Cherry-topped dish : SUNDAE
76. Venerable English school : ETON
77. Dinghy need : OAR
78. “Thor: Ragnarok” actor Idris : ELBA
82. Live, TV-wise : ON AIR
83. Bouquet bearer : VASE
85. Mariano Rivera, memorably : YANKEE
88. Alley in comics : OOP
89. A hungry janitor might __ : BITE THE DUST
92. Shade : HUE
93. Curved plumbing piece : P-TRAP
95. Call __ day : IT A
96. Monopoly buy : HOTEL
97. Somber notice : OBIT
99. CafePress purchase : T-SHIRT
100. Comes together : GELS
102. Kellogg’s toaster pastry : POP-TART
104. Philistine : BOOR
105. Inched : CREPT
107. A hungry banker might __ : DOWN PAYMENTS
113. Point of contention : ISSUE
116. Swearing or swearing-in words : OATH
118. Cookie grain : OATS
119. Mystique : AURA
120. A hungry angler might __ : SWALLOW THE BAIT
124. Lanai furniture material : RATTAN
126. “One man’s struggle to take it easy,” for “Ferris Bueller” : TAG LINE
127. Intimidating words : OR ELSE!
128. Password preceder : USER ID
129. Poor rating : ONE STAR
130. Actress Falco : EDIE
131. Reason : SANITY

Down

1. Measure up : CUT IT
2. Singer Baker : ANITA
3. 14-time Grammy-winning banjoist Béla : FLECK
4. North Carolina team : TAR HEELS
5. Unlike this ans. : ACR
6. One who picks up a lot : NEATNIK
7. Mexican painter Frida : KAHLO
8. Night before : EVE
9. Chapel bench : PEW
10. Champ’s collection : TITLES
11. Trains : INSTRUCTS
12. A behavioral sci. : SOC
13. Ferrell’s “SNL” cheerleading partner : OTERI
14. Guiding principles : TENETS
15. Willing to listen : OPEN
16. Auto store buy : PART
17. “Grand” ice cream brand : EDY’S
19. Ponzi scheme, e.g. : SCAM
20. Psalm pronoun : THY
24. Sincere attempts : EFFORTS
27. Oft-chewed item : FAT
31. Defiant response : I DO SO!
32. TiVo predecessor : VCR
33. Foot that’s part of a meter : IAMB
35. Four Corners state : UTAH
38. City on Lake Erie : TOLEDO
40. WWII sub : U-BOAT
41. Gush on stage : EMOTE
42. Wiped out : TIRED
43. Ramadan ritual : FAST
44. Abu Dhabi dignitary : EMIR
45. Name on Irish euros : EIRE
46. Veda reader : HINDU
47. Resembling : A LA
49. Omega rival : SEIKO
52. Capital north of Berlin : OSLO
54. Like some bagels : ONIONY
55. Pond papa : DRAKE
58. Stopped at sea, with “to” : HOVE
59. Chatters : PRATES
63. Terrier on “Frasier” : EDDIE
66. Before now : AGO
67. Fit to be tied : SORE
69. Word before or after “mother” : EARTH
70. Outcome : RESULT
71. Breakfast-on-the-run pickup : DONUT
72. Really feel the heat : BAKE
73. Pulitzer-winning Ferber novel : SO BIG
74. Work together : UNITE
75. Present at birth : NATAL
79. Actress Petty of “Orange Is the New Black” : LORI
80. Tusked critter : BOAR
81. Cal. entry : APPT
83. Naysayer’s weapon? : VETO POWER
84. Highly skilled in : ADEPT AT
86. Often-seared tuna : AHI
87. English Derby town : EPSOM
90. Last element in Pandora’s box : HOPE
91. Lawn-Boy parent company : TORO
94. Menace : THREATEN
98. Texter’s “Oh, and another thing … ” : BTW …
99. Geoffrey the Giraffe’s store : TOYS “R” US
101. River racers : SCULLS
103. Stick (to) : ADHERE
104. Carlsbad Caverns dweller : BAT
106. Bright again : RELIT
108. White __ : NOISE
109. Party spread : PATE
110. __-Grain: breakfast bar brand : NUTRI
111. Blue eyes, e.g. : TRAIT
112. Baseball Hall of Famer Koufax : SANDY
113. Ratio phrase : IS TO
114. Adult cygnet : SWAN
115. Herb used in turkey dressing : SAGE
117. E’en if : THO’
121. “Based __ true story” : ON A
122. Retirement spot : BED
123. “Moonlight” Oscar winner Mahershala __ : ALI
125. Comparison words : AS A

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10 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 11 Nov 18, Sunday”

  1. Cool theme, though I didn’t know the phrase chew the scenery. This took me a good hour and as usual I had to look a few things up. A fun way to spend an overcast afternoon in Tokyo

  2. LAT: 20:00, 4 errors. Messed up a section and couldn’t see it for some reason. Again, scary time I actually filled all this in at. Newsday: 18:38, no errors. Washington Post: 24:37, no errors.

  3. LAT: 24:57. no errors. Newsday: 17:22, no errors. Snowy day here, so normal Sunday activities are on hold. Might try the WP after I finish the last Croce left over from trip time (the one from Friday, 2018/11/02, which is turning out to be a real bear).

    1. Washington Post: 27:46, no errors; pleasant enough. Croce (Friday, 2018/11/02): three or four hours, spread out over several sessions, no errors; very difficult cluing and lots of things I had to guess at; a wild ride from beginning to end.

  4. @ Anne Manney…….my paper has PRESENT AT BIRTH for 75 down which is natal
    50 min. And no errors
    I have heard of HEAVE TO but HOVE TO is new to me.

    1. I think the “hove” clue might have been slightly in error. I’ve heard the phrase “hove into view.” So maybe the puzzle author meant to say “Stopped at sea, with ‘into’ ” for 58 down instead of “Stopped at sea, with ‘to’ “

    1. Hi Diane– ACR is an abbreviation for ACROSS. So, the “ans.” (answer) is not written across, it’s written down, making it unlike an across answer.

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