LA Times Crossword 7 Nov 18, Wednesday

Advertisement

Advertisement

Constructed by: Michael Ray Jacobson & Patti Varol
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: Joni Mitchell

Themed answers are titles of songs and albums released by JONI MITCHELL, who is celebrating her 75th birthday today:

  • 55A. Singer/songwriter born 11/7/1943 : JONI MITCHELL
  • 20A. 1968 55-Across song : BOTH SIDES NOW
  • 32A. 1976 55-Across album : HEJIRA
  • 37A. 1970 55-Across song : BIG YELLOW TAXI
  • 43A. 1969 55-Across album whose last song is 20-Across : CLOUDS

Bill’s time: 7m 12s

Bill’s errors: 0

Advertisement

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

5. Geologic time : EPOCH

Geological time is divided into a number of units of varying lengths. These are, starting from the largest:

  • supereon
  • eon (also “aeon”)
  • era
  • period
  • epoch
  • age

14. Baseball’s Felipe or his son Moises : ALOU

Moisés Alou played Major League Baseball, as did his father Felipe and his uncles Matty and Jesús.

15. Nabisco wafer brand : NILLA

As one might expect, “Nilla” is a shortened form of “vanilla”. However, you won’t find any vanilla in Nilla brand cookies or wafers. They have always been flavored with vanillin, which is synthetic vanilla. Is nothing sacred …?

16. Serengeti feline : LION

The Serengeti is a region in Africa, located in northern Tanzania and southwest Kenya. The name “Serengeti” comes from the Maasai language and means “Endless Plains”.

17. Barclays Center team : NETS

The Barclays Center is an arena in Brooklyn, New York that is home to the Brooklyn Nets of the NBA, and to the New York Islanders of the NHL. Barclays ending up paying over $200 million for the naming rights, even though the London-based banking group has no retail banks or ATMs in the US.

20. 1968 55-Across song : BOTH SIDES, NOW

“Both Sides, Now” is a very successful 1968 song written by Joni Mitchell, and most famously recorded by Judy Collins. It has been recorded many, many times by many different artists, including Leonard Nimoy would you believe?

23. Axis foes : ALLIES

The Allies of World War II were the countries opposing the Axis powers, the most of which were Germany, Japan and Italy. When war broke out in 1939, the Allies consisted of France, Poland and the UK, with the independent countries of the British Commonwealth, such as Australia and Canada, joining a few days later. Although the Americans provided material support to the Allies throughout the conflict, the US did not officially join until December 1941, immediately after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. It took until 1942 for the member countries to agree on a formal treaty of cooperation, doing so in a document known as the Declaration by United Nations. This declaration became the basis of the United Nations (UN), with the UN Charter being signed by 50 countries in 1945.

Before WWII, Hungary’s prime minister was lobbying for an alliance between Germany, Hungary and Italy and worked towards such a relationship that he called an “axis”. The main Axis powers during the war were Germany, Italy and Japan. However, also included in the relationship were Romania, Bulgaria and the aforementioned Hungary.

24. Spot for an AirPod : EAR

AirPods are Apple’s line of bluetooth earpods. When AirPods were introduced in 2016, the market reacted with some skepticism. The left and right AirPods are not connected by any wire, so there was concern that individual earbuds could fall out of the ear, and possibly get lost. Another concern is Apple’s stated intent to abandon the wired headphone socket on new iPhone models.

29. Sundance’s sweetie __ Place : ETTA

Etta Place is the schoolteacher character played by the lovely Katharine Ross in the superb 1969 movie “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid”.

32. 1976 55-Across album : HEJIRA
(55A. Singer/songwriter born 11/7/1943 : JONI MITCHELL)

“Hejira” is a 1976 album released by Canadian singer-songwriter Joni Mitchell. Mitchell wrote the bulk of the songs on the album on a road trip from Maine to Los Angeles. The album’s title comes from the Arabic word “hijra” meaning “journey”.

36. “Do __ others … ” : UNTO

The Golden Rule is also known as the ethic of reciprocity, and is a basis for the concept of human rights. A version of the rule used in the Christian tradition is attributed to Jesus:

Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

37. 1970 55-Across song : BIG YELLOW TAXI
(55A. Singer/songwriter born 11/7/1943 : JONI MITCHELL)

Joni Mitchell was looking out the window of her hotel in Hawaii in 1970 when she was inspired to write what has proved to be one of the most enduring environmentalist anthems. She looked at the lovely mountain scenery in the background, and the “heart breaking” parking lot as far as she could see in the foreground. She used the image as the opening lines for the song “Big Yellow Taxi“ that she released later that same year. The song never really became a hit, but it has a sustained, relatively low level of popularity that has lasted for decades. Personally, I love the “Big Yellow Taxi” …

They paved paradise
And put up a parking lot
With a pink hotel, a boutique
And a swinging hot spot

41. “The Walking Dead” survivor Grimes : CARL

“The Walking Dead” is a horror television show made by AMC that is based on a comic book series of the same name. There are lots of flesh-eating zombies featured, so I won’t be caught “dead” watching it …

43. 1969 55-Across album whose last song is 20-Across : CLOUDS

“Clouds” is a 1969 album released by Joni Mitchell. The most famous tracks on the album are “Chelsea Morning” and “Both Sides, Now”.

46. Business review site : YELP

yelp.com is a website that provides a local business directory and reviews of services. The site is sort of like Yellow Pages on steroids, and the term “yelp” is derived from “yel-low p-ages”.

47. Influential D.C. group : PAC

A political action committee (PAC) is a private group that works to influence the outcome of a particular election or group of elections. Any group becomes a PAC by law when it receives or spends more than $1,000 for the purpose of influencing the outcome of an election. In 2010 the Supreme Court ruled that PACS that did not make direct contributions to candidates or parties could accept unlimited contributions. These “independent, expenditure-only committees” are commonly referred to as “super PACs”.

55. Singer/songwriter born 11/7/1943 : JONI MITCHELL

Joni Mitchell is a Canadian singer and songwriter from Fort MacLeod in Alberta. Mitchell is perhaps best known for her recordings “Big Yellow Taxi” and “Woodstock”.

58. Auburn rival, familiarly : BAMA

The athletic teams of the University of Alabama (“Bama”) are nicknamed the Crimson Tide, which is a reference to the team colors of crimson and white.

61. Miguel’s “I love you” : TE AMO

“I love you” translates into “te amo” in Spanish, and into “je t’aime” in French.

62. Small Chevy model : AVEO

The Chevrolet Aveo is a subcompact automobile that has been around since 2002. The Aveo is manufactured by GM Daewoo, the GM subsidiary in South Korea. Although the Aveo name is still used in some markets, here in North America the Aveo has been sold as the Chevrolet Sonic since 2012. By the way, GM Daewoo is the third largest manufacturer of automobiles in South Korea, after Hyundai and Kia.

66. Tach reading : REVS

The tachometer takes its name from the Greek word “tachos” meaning “speed”. A tachometer in a car measures engine revolutions per minute (rpm).

Down

1. Metrosexual tote : MAN BAG

I think it’s generally accepted that the term “metrosexual”, from “metropolitan heterosexual”, refers to a man who lives in an urban environment and puts a fair amount of money and energy into his appearance. That wouldn’t be me …

2. Repetitive refrain in the song “Hot Hot Hot” : OLE-OLE

“Hot Hot Hot” is a song written and first recorded in 1982 by Arrow, a singer-songwriter from the island of Montserrat in the Caribbean. “Hot Hot Hot” became a dance floor hit for Arrow, and then really took off when it was covered in 1987 by Buster Poindexter. Ole ole …

4. Fish dish served with wasabi : SUSHI

Sushi is a Japanese dish that has as its primary ingredient cooked, vinegared rice. The rice is usually topped with something, most often fish, and can be served in seaweed rolls. If we want raw fish by itself, then we have to order “sashimi”.

Sometimes called Japanese horseradish, wasabi is a root used as a condiment in Japanese cooking. The taste of wasabi is more like mustard than a hot pepper in that the vapors that create the “hotness” stimulate the nasal passages rather than the tongue. Personally, I love the stuff …

6. Like a noted piper : PIED

The legend of the Pied Piper of Hamelin dates back to medieval times. Recently there have been suggestions that the story is rooted in some truth, that the town of Hamelin did in fact lose many of its children, perhaps to plague. The suggestion is that the tale is an allegory. The use of the word “pied” implies that the piper dressed in multi-colored clothing.

7. Quaint retail adjective : OLDE

The word “olde” wasn’t actually used much earlier than the 1920s. “Olde” was introduced to give a quaint antique feel to brand names, shop names etc. as in “Ye Olde Shoppe”.

9. ESPN anchor __ Storm : HANNAH

Hannah Storm is a sports journalist who co-hosts the Sunday version of “SportsCenter” on ESPN. Storm is the daughter of sports executive Mike Storen, who was president of the NBA’s Atlanta Hawks.

10. It may be tragic : FLAW

In drama, a tragic flaw (sometimes “fatal flaw”) is a weakness or error made by the protagonist that ultimately leads to his or her reversal of fortune. “Tragic flaw” is often referred to as “hamartia”, a similar-meaning term from Greek tragedy.

13. Explosive letters : TNT

“TNT” is an abbreviation for trinitrotoluene. Trinitrotoluene was first produced in 1863 by the German chemist Joseph Wilbrand, who developed it for use as a yellow dye. TNT is relatively difficult to detonate so it was on the market as a dye for some years before its more explosive properties were discovered.

25. “We just said the same thing at the same time!” : JINX

A jinx is a charm or a spell, and the word “jinx” comes from an older word “jyng” from the 17th-century. A “jyng” was another word for the wryneck, a type of bird much used in witchcraft.

27. “Little Red Book” author : MAO

During China’s Cultural Revolution, the Communist Party published a book of statements and writings from Chairman Mao Zedong. Here in the West the publication was usually referred to as “The Little Red Book”.

33. San __, Puerto Rico : JUAN

San Juan is the capital city of Puerto Rico. It was founded in 1521 by the Spanish, who called it “Ciudad de Puerto Rico” (Rich Port City).

34. “House,” in Inuit : IGLU

The Inuit word for “house” is “iglu”, which we usually write as “igloo”. The Greenlandic (yes, that’s a language) word for “house” is very similar, namely “igdlo”. The walls of igloos are tremendous insulators, due to the air pockets in the blocks of snow.

41. Included in an email, briefly : CC’D

I wonder do the kids of today know that “cc” stands for carbon copy, and do they have any idea what a carbon copy was? Do you remember how messy carbon paper was to handle? A kind blog reader pointed out to me recently that the abbreviation has evolved and taken on the meaning “courtesy copy” in our modern world.

44. “Gloria in Excelsis __” : DEO

“Gloria in excelsis Deo” is a Latin hymn, the title of which translates as “Glory to God in the Highest”.

45. “In America” novelist Susan : SONTAG

Susan Sontag was a writer and political activist from New York City. Sontag wrote extensively on a number of subjects, including photography. She spent the last decade of her life in a relationship with renowned photographer Annie Leibovitz.

47. Pet problems? : PEEVES

The phrase “pet peeve”, meaning “thing that provokes one most”, seems to be somewhat ironic. A “peeve” is a source of irritation, and the adjective “pet” means “especially cherished”.

54. Uniform cloth : KHAKI

“Khaki” is an Urdu word that translates literally as “dusty”. The word was adopted for its current use as the name of a fabric by the British cavalry in India in the mid-1800s.

55. Rogers Centre team, familiarly : JAYS

The SkyDome is a stadium in downtown Toronto, home to the Toronto Blue Jays baseball team and the Toronto Argonauts Canadian football team. The SkyDome was officially renamed to the Rogers Centre when it, and the Toronto Blue Jays team, was purchased by Rogers Communications in 2005.

56. K follower : -MART

Kmart is the third largest discount store chain in the world, behind Wal-Mart and Target. The company was founded by S. S. Kresge in 1899, with the first outlets known as S. S. Kresge stores. The first “Kmart” stores opened in 1962, with the “K” standing for “Kresge”. Kmart is famous for its promotions known as “blue light specials”, a program first introduced in 1965 and discontinued in 1991. I remember being in a Kmart store soon after coming to live in the US. That evening an employee installed a light stand an aisle away from me, switched on a flashing blue light and there was some unintelligible announcement over the loudspeaker system. I had no idea what was going on …

58. Trivia night site : BAR

Trivia are things of little consequence. “Trivia” is the plural of the Latin word “trivium” which means “a place where three roads meet”. Now that’s what I call a trivial fact …

60. Big D hoopster : MAV

The Mavericks are the NBA franchise in Dallas, Texas. The team was founded in 1980, and the Mavericks name was chosen by fan votes. The choice of “Mavericks” was prompted by the fact that the actor James Garner was a part-owner of the team, and Garner of course played the title role in the “Maverick” television series.

“Big D” is a nickname for the city of Dallas, Texas.

Advertisement

[ad_below_googlies]

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Crowds around : MOBS
5. Geologic time : EPOCH
10. It’s the truth : FACT
14. Baseball’s Felipe or his son Moises : ALOU
15. Nabisco wafer brand : NILLA
16. Serengeti feline : LION
17. Barclays Center team : NETS
18. Strung along : LED ON
19. Boatloads : A LOT
20. 1968 55-Across song : BOTH SIDES, NOW
23. Axis foes : ALLIES
24. Spot for an AirPod : EAR
25. Tight spot : JAM
28. “__ whiz!” : GEE
29. Sundance’s sweetie __ Place : ETTA
32. 1976 55-Across album : HEJIRA
34. Lofty principles : IDEALS
36. “Do __ others … ” : UNTO
37. 1970 55-Across song : BIG YELLOW TAXI
41. “The Walking Dead” survivor Grimes : CARL
42. Advertising lure : COME-ON
43. 1969 55-Across album whose last song is 20-Across : CLOUDS
46. Business review site : YELP
47. Influential D.C. group : PAC
50. Place in the woods : DEN
51. Forever and a day : EON
53. “Watch and learn” : LIKE SO
55. Singer/songwriter born 11/7/1943 : JONI MITCHELL
58. Auburn rival, familiarly : BAMA
61. Miguel’s “I love you” : TE AMO
62. Small Chevy model : AVEO
63. Vacationing : AWAY
64. Harsh-smelling : ACRID
65. Sharp-edged : KEEN
66. Tach reading : REVS
67. Annoy : GET TO
68. Car trip game : I SPY

Down

1. Metrosexual tote : MAN BAG
2. Repetitive refrain in the song “Hot Hot Hot” : OLE-OLE
3. Perfume holder : BOTTLE
4. Fish dish served with wasabi : SUSHI
5. Willing recruit : ENLISTEE
6. Like a noted piper : PIED
7. Quaint retail adjective : OLDE
8. In the neighborhood : CLOSE
9. ESPN anchor __ Storm : HANNAH
10. It may be tragic : FLAW
11. Not feel well : AIL
12. Whisper sweet nothings : COO
13. Explosive letters : TNT
21. Far from swanky : SEEDY
22. Mined-over matter : ORE
25. “We just said the same thing at the same time!” : JINX
26. Basic drawing class : ART I
27. “Little Red Book” author : MAO
30. Powder puff stuff : TALC
31. Bronze or brass : ALLOY
33. San __, Puerto Rico : JUAN
34. “House,” in Inuit : IGLU
35. A few : SOME
37. Hayloft bundle : BALE
38. Wrinkle remover : IRON
39. Prosperous : WELL-TO-DO
40. __ sentence: essay opener : TOPIC
41. Included in an email, briefly : CC’D
44. “Gloria in Excelsis __” : DEO
45. “In America” novelist Susan : SONTAG
47. Pet problems? : PEEVES
48. __ at the wheel : ASLEEP
49. Ant-sy complex? : COLONY
52. Female relative : NIECE
54. Uniform cloth : KHAKI
55. Rogers Centre team, familiarly : JAYS
56. K follower : -MART
57. “Look no further than me” : I’M IT
58. Trivia night site : BAR
59. Bedazzle : AWE
60. Big D hoopster : MAV

Advertisement

[ad_below_clue_list]

12 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 7 Nov 18, Wednesday”

  1. A few weeks ago, someone mentioned instead of always starting from the top , they work around the theme. So lately I have been doing that , (hard to change ) but as soon as I got 43 across clouds, I knew it was Joni Mitchell. The rest was a breeze. Good puzzle.

  2. Constructors / editor: The clue and answer combo for 60A is sloppy and lazy. Calling it a “misdirect” will make you feel better, I imagine.

  3. LAT: 9:29, no errors. Newsday: 6:48, no errors. WSJ: 10:40, no errors. CHE: 14:35, no errors. Still playing catch-up after my trip, so I haven’t gotten to my stack of Croce puzzles …

    @Anonymous … There doesn’t seem to be a 60A in this puzzle. (However, I shall curb my inner snark and refrain from making a gratuitous comment involving either of the words “sloppy” or “lazy” … 😜.)

  4. LAT: 9:56, no errors. Puzzle was a good illustration of the election, whereby I had to use crosses to get all of the theme entries. Highly unenjoyable. WSJ: 21:39, 1 error. Pretty difficult. Newsday: 6:00, no errors. CHE: 16:10, 3 dumb errors.

  5. 28 min. and no errors.
    Unlike Bill I love ” the walking dead” and Carl Grimes was killed off last season, his father Rick is the Grimes survivor.

  6. 12:59, and embarrassingly enough, DNF. Could not call to mind the Joni Mitchell album titles; and with one being HEJIRA, fuggedaboudit. 4 fills not completed.

    The clue for 25 Down, was pretty arcane; unfair, even. I’m sure you could easily find a better clue for that one. Hex, curse, either of those would be better than some long-forgotten playground saying.

  7. 10:02. I know the name JONI MITCHELL and kind of recognized BOTH SIDES NOW when all but 2 letters were filled in. Otherwise, I had to treat this like a themeless….or more accurately a clueless as that’s what I was regarding her songs.

    I’ll quote Crash Davis (played by Kevin Costner in “Bull Durham”) about Susan SONTAG’s writings being a bunch of “self-indulgent overrated cr[ud]”. It’s a bunch of nonsense that sounds profound but isn’t at all. I’d put a link to his rant, but it’s not exactly Rated G. If anyone wants to find it, it’s on You Tube under “Bull Durham ‘I BELIEVE’ Speech”.

    Felt good to rant. It’s been a long day, but if Sfingi and Carrie can throw books across the room, I can put this 🙂

    Best –

  8. @Jeff – thanx for mentioning me – and the nickname – Sfingi – is on our Nissan Cube license plate – it’s a Sicilian dessert for St. Joseph’s day.

    This puzzle was a headache, though I liked Miss Joni back in the day.
    I got one square wrong. Had HEGyRA crosses JyNX; and left one square blank – CCD crosses DEN. thought it could be an F.
    Too many sports clues. Even when done I didn’t know EAR, ETTA, YELP, BAMA, HANNAH, JAYS, NETS, MAV (last 5 are sports).
    My Trivia Crack iPhone game keeps telling me “Sports is your worst category.” So what’s new?

  9. Moderately difficult Wednesday for me; took 22 minutes with no errors but plenty of cross checking to finally finish it. Mildly distracted, in somewhat of a daze after the less than satisfying election, but managed to get it together in the end.

  10. Hello every buddy!!🙃

    No errors. I’m a big Joni fan, so the themed answers came easily and had me smiling.

    Come to think of it, for my guitar lesson this evening I should have gone for one of Ms Mitchell’s songs. They’re very challenging– she plays complex patterns in alternate tuning. I used to be able to play some of her songs….😮….Instead tonight I chose to work on another beautiful tune, “America,” by Simon and Garfunkel. Wish I could link it here — it’s also good for clearing one’s head after election day. 🙃

    Be well ~~🎸

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.