LA Times Crossword 6 Jan 19, Sunday

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Constructed by: Garry Morse
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: But Is It Art?

We have a quip in today’s puzzle, one from the very droll Steven Wright:

  • 22A. Start of a quip : I WENT TO …
  • 36A. Quip, part 2 : … A MUSEUM WHERE THEY HAVE …
  • 55A. Quip, part 3 : … ALL THE HEADS AND …
  • 66A. Quip, part 4 : … ARMS …
  • 79A. Quip, part 5 : … FROM THE STATUES …
  • 94A. Quip, part 6 : … THAT ARE IN ALL THE OTHER …
  • 117A. End of the quip : … MUSEUMS
  • 8A. With 123-Across, speaker of the quip : STEVEN …
  • 123A. See 8-Across : … WRIGHT

Bill’s time: 17m 53s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Ohm reciprocal : SIEMENS

Conductance (measured in mhos) is the inverse of resistance (measured in ohms). The mho has been replaced by the SI unit called the siemens.

8. With 123-Across, speaker of the quip : STEVEN …
(123. See 8-Across : … WRIGHT)

Steven Wright is a remarkably droll comedian from Cambridge, Massachusetts. Wright is very, very quotable:

  • What’s another word for Thesaurus?
  • If a word in the dictionary were misspelled, how would we know?
  • I intend to live forever. So far, so good.
  • When I was a little kid we had a sandbox. It was a quicksand box. I was an only child… eventually.

14. Hybrid tableware : SPORK

“Spork” is the more common name for the utensil that is a hybrid between a spoon and a fork. The same utensil is less commonly referred to as a “foon”.

19. Black Sea country : ROMANIA

Romania sits just east of Hungary and north of Bulgaria in Europe. Romania was formed from the union of two principalities in 1859, Moldavia and Wallachia. The Kingdom of Romania grew larger in size after WWI with the addition of three new regions, including the “vampirish” Transylvania.

The Black Sea is in southeastern Europe just south of Ukraine. In the north of the Black Sea is the Crimean Peninsula.

21. Judge of the Yankees : AARON

Aaron Judge is a baseball outfielder who was selected as 2017’s American League Rookie of the Year. Judge is a big guy. He weighs 282 pounds, and is 6 foot 7 inches tall.

23. Beauty goddesses : GRACES

In Greek and Roman mythology there were goddesses of the better things in life, charm, beauty, nature, creativity and fertility. In Greece they were known as the Charites and in Rome they were the Gratiae. In English we refer to them as the Graces, of which there are usually three:

  • Aglaea (aka Splendor)
  • Euphrosyne (aka Mirth)
  • Thalia (aka Good Cheer)

24. Crunchy snack : FRITO

The Frito Corporation was started in 1932 by Elmer Doolin, basically in his mother’s kitchen. Doolin paid $100 for a corn chip recipe from a local restaurant and started producing Fritos at the rate of 10 pounds per day.

25. Big Apple restaurateur : SARDI

Sardi’s is a famous restaurant in the Theater District of Manhattan that was opened in 1927 by Italian immigrant Vincent Sardi, Sr. Sardi’s is famous for attracting celebrities who sometimes pose for caricatures that are then displayed on the restaurant’s walls. After the death of actress and director Antoinette Perry in 1946, her friend and partner Brock Pemberton was having lunch at Sardi’s and came up with idea of a theater award that could be presented in Perry’s honor. The award was to be called the Tony Award. In fact, Vincent Sardi, Sr. was presented with a special Tony at the first award ceremony, held in 1947.

26. Chef’s amts. : TBSPS

Tablespoon (tbsp.)

30. “Wedding Bell Blues” soloist Marilyn : MCCOO

Marilyn McCoo is best known as the lead female singer with the 5th Dimension, a group that was very successful in the sixties and seventies. McCoo married another member of the 5th Dimension, Billy Davis, Jr. The couple are still performing, but now as a duo.

32. Org. with an Acid Rain Program : EPA

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

Acid rain is any precipitation that is unusually acidic. The acidity in rain mainly comes from sulfur dioxide that is discharged into the atmosphere from industrial plants and volcanic eruptions.

35. Three before kappa : ETA

Eta is the seventh letter of the Greek alphabet, and is a forerunner of our Latin character “H”. Originally denoting a consonant, eta was used as a long vowel in Ancient Greek.

Kappa is the 10th letter of the Greek alphabet, and the equivalent of our letter K.

46. Heads of the Sorbonne : TETES

“Sorbonne” is the name usually used for the old University of Paris, and some of the institutions that have succeeded it. The institution was named for French theologian Robert de Sorbonne who founded the original Collège de Sorbonne in 1257. That’s quite a while ago …

47. Sticker : THORN

Believe it or not, roses don’t have any thorns. Thorns are derived from shoots, spines are derived from leaves, and prickles are derived from the epidermis. The rose’s defensive barbs are in fact prickles.

48. Evil Luthor : LEX

Lex Luthor is the arch-nemesis of Superman in comics. Luthor has been portrayed in a number of guises in the comic world as well in movies and on the small screen. For example, he appeared as Atom Man in the 1950 film series “Atom Man vs. Superman”, and was played by actor Lyle Talbot, opposite Kirk Alyn’s Superman.

52. NYC line that stops at Yankee Stadium, familiarly : IRT

The Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) was the original private operator of the New York Subway when it opened in 1904. The city took over ownership of the system in 1940, but the lines originally operated by the IRT are still known by the IRT moniker.

58. Glee club member : TENOR

A glee club is a choir group, usually of males, that sings short songs known as “glees”. A glee is a song scored for three or more voices that is performed unaccompanied.

62. Boise’s st. : IDA

Boise, Idaho is the largest metropolitan area in the state by far. There are a number of stories pertaining to the etymology of the name “Boise”. One is that French trappers called the tree-lined river that ran through the area “la rivière boisée”, meaning “the wooded river”.

65. Email afterthoughts : PSS

One adds a PS (post scriptum, or simply “postscript”) at the end of a letter (ltr.). A second postscript is a post post scriptum, a PPS.

68. Short alias? : AKA

Also known as (aka)

71. European carrier : SAS

SAS was formerly known as Scandinavian Airlines System and is the flag carrier of three countries: Denmark, Norway and Sweden. SAS is based at Stockholm Arlanda Airport located just north of the Swedish capital.

72. Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge denizen : NENE

The nene is a bird that native to Hawaii, and is also known as the Hawaiian goose. The name “nene” is imitative of its call. When Captain Cook landed on the islands in 1778, there were 25,000 nene living there. By 1950, the number was reduced by hunting to just 30 birds. Conservation efforts in recent years have been somewhat successful. The nene was named State Bird of Hawaii in 1957.

Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge is located on the island of Kauai. A prominent structure in the refuge is the Kilauea Lighthouse that was built in 1913.

74. Safari beast : GNU

The gnu is also known as the wildebeest, and is an antelope native to Africa. “Wildebeest” is a Dutch meaning “wild beast”.

75. Maestro Ozawa : SEIJI

Seiji Ozawa is most famous for his work as music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, although he is also the principal conductor of the Vienna State Opera. Ozawa is renowned for wearing a white turtleneck under his dress suit when he conducts, rather than the traditional starched shirt and white tie.

77. Shrek creator William : STEIG

Before “Shrek” was a successful movie franchise and Broadway musical, it was a children’s picture book called “Shrek!” that was authored and illustrated by William Steig. The title “Shrek!” came from the German/Yiddish word Schreck, meaning “fear” or “terror”.

87. Air traffic mgmt. group : FAA

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) was set up in 1958 (as the Federal Aviation Agency). The agency was established at that particular time largely in response to an increasing number of midair collisions. The worst of these disasters had taken place two years earlier over the Grand Canyon, a crash between two commercial passenger airplanes that resulted in 128 fatalities.

91. Either of two hearth borders? : AITCH

There is a letter H (aitch) at either end of the word “hearth”.

93. Altar constellation : ARA

The constellation of Ara takes its name from the Latin word for “altar”.

99. Rhyming boxer : ALI

Muhammad Ali first used his famous catchphrase “float like a butterfly and sting like a bee” before his world title fight against Sonny Liston in 1964. Back then Ali still went by his birth name of Cassius Clay.

101. Calrissian of “Star Wars” films : LANDO

The character Lando Calrissian was played by actor Billy Dee Williams in two of the “Star Wars” movies.

106. Laker or Raptor, briefly : NBAER

The Los Angeles Lakers basketball team started out in 1947 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The team chose the Lakers name in honor of the nickname of Minnesota, “Land of 10,000 Lakes”. The Lakers moved to Los Angeles in 1960.

The Raptors are the NBA basketball team based in Toronto, Ontario.

109. Bass-baritone Simon : ESTES

Simon Estes is an African-American baritone bass, and is considered one of a small group of performers who broke through a racial barrier that was present in the world of opera. Estes moved to Europe in the sixties to try to launch his career in an environment that was perhaps a little less prejudicial to people of African descent. There he performed in all the great opera houses including La Scala and Covent Garden. He did some guest performances in the US through the sixties and seventies, but it wasn’t until 1981 that he was offered a contract to sing with the Metropolitan Opera in New York City.

114. Lowest points : NADIRS

The nadir is the direction pointing immediately below a particular location (through to the other side of the Earth for example). The opposite direction, that pointing immediately above, is called the zenith. We use the terms “nadir” and “zenith” figuratively to mean the low and high points in a person’s fortunes.

119. “War of the Worlds” target : EARTH

“The War of the Worlds” is a science fiction classic penned by H. G. Wells in 1895-97. This compelling story of Martians invading Earth has been adapted many times into radio dramas, a television series and several movies.

Down

1. Indian titles : SRIS

“Sri” is a title of respect for a male in India.

2. State admitted to the Union after Texas : IOWA

What is now the state of Iowa was part of French (and Spanish) Louisiana from 1682 until the US negotiated the Louisiana Purchase in 1803. The US divided the purchased land into the District of Louisiana and the Indiana Territory, with present-day Iowa falling into the former. Congress established the Territory of Iowa in 1838. In 1846, Iowa was admitted as the 29th state in the Union.

4. 400+ million of them are produced daily : M AND MS

Forrest Mars, Sr. was the founder of the Mars Company. Forrest invented the Mars Bar while living over in England and then developed M&M’s when he returned to the US. Mars came up with the idea for M&M’s when he saw soldiers in the Spanish Civil War eating chocolate pellets. Those pellets had a hard shell of tempered chocolate on the outside to prevent them from melting. Mars got some of the funding to develop the M&M from William Murrie, the son of the president of Hershey’s Chocolate. It is the “M” and “M” from “Mars” and “Murrie” that gives the name to the candy.

7. Príncipe’s island partner : SAO TOME

The Democratic Republic of São Tomé and Príncipe is an island nation off the west coast of Africa comprising mainly two islands: São Tomé and Príncipe. São Tomé and Príncipe is located in the Gulf of Guinea, off the coast of Gabon. It was colonized by Portugal after POrtuguese explorers discovered the islands in the 15th century. After gaining independence in 1975, São Tomé and Príncipe is now the smallest Portuguese-speaking country in the world.

9. Former ACC Cavalier rival : TERP

The sports teams of the University of Maryland are called the Maryland Terrapins, or “the Terps” for short. The name dates back to 1932 when it was coined by the the university’s president at the time, Curley Byrd. He took the name from the diamondback terrapins that are native to the Chesapeake Bay.

The University of Virginia sports teams are known officially as “the Cavaliers”. The unofficial nickname is “the Wahoos”.

12. Seine summer : ETE

In French, the season of “été” (summer) starts in “juin” (June). Note that the names of months are not capitalized in French.

The Seine is the river that flows through Paris. The Seine empties into the English Channel to the north, at the port city of Le Havre.

13. Loch with a legend : NESS

The Loch Ness monster has been talked about for centuries, but modern interest started in 1933 when a spate of sightings was reported. Those sightings don’t seem to have stopped, with photographs really sparking the imagination.

15. Outcast : PARIAH

“Pariah” is an anglicized version of the Tamil word “Paraiyar”. The Paraiyar are a social group of about 9 million people found in some Indian states and in Sri Lanka. The term “pariah” came to be a general term for members of the lowest caste in society, outcasts.

17. __ IRA : ROTH

Roth Individual Retirement Accounts (Roth IRAs) were introduced in 1997 under a bill sponsored by Senator William Roth of Delaware, hence the name.

27. Dressy pasta? : BOW TIES

“Farfalle” is commonly referred to as “bow-tie pasta” because of its shape. The name comes from the Italian “farfalla” meaning “butterfly”.

31. Fast sailing ships : CUTTERS

Sloops and cutters are sailboats, and each has just one mast. One major difference between the two types of vessel is that the mast on a cutter is set much further aft than the mast on a sloop.

34. Balkan capital : ATHENS

Athens is the capital city of Greece and is one of the world’s oldest cities, with a history that goes back around 3,400 years. In its heyday, Classical Athens was a remarkable center for the arts and philosophical debate, and was home to Plato and Aristotle. Athens is often called “the cradle of Western civilization” and “the birthplace of democracy”. The city was named for the Greek goddess Athena.

The Balkan Peninsula in Southeast Europe is usually referred to as “the Balkans”. The region takes its name from the Balkan Mountains located in present-day Bulgaria and Serbia. “Balkan” is Bulgarian for “mountain”.

39. Mount Olympus VIP : HERA

In Greek mythology, Hera was the wife of Zeus and was noted for her jealous and vengeful nature, particularly against those who vied for the affections of her husband. The equivalent character to Hera in Roman mythology was Juno. Hera was the daughter of Cronus and Rhea.

Mount Olympus is the highest peak in Greece. In Greek mythology, Mount Olympus was home to the gods, and in particular home to the principal gods known as the Twelve Olympians.

40. Town line sign abbr. : ESTD

Established (“est.” or “estd.”)

41. 1950s tennis great Lew : HOAD

Lew Hoad was a former number-one ranked Australian tennis player. Hoad was ranked as the World No. 1 in 1956.

42. Dior creations : A-LINES

An A-line skirt is one that fits snugly at the hips and flares toward the hem.

43. Shakespearean title city : VERONA

Verona is a city in northern Italy. Famously, William Shakespeare set three of his plays in Verona: “Romeo and Juliet”, “The Two Gentlemen of Verona” and “The Taming of the Shrew”.

51. Chain with syrup choices : IHOP

The International House of Pancakes (IHOP) was founded back in 1958. IHOP was originally intended to be called IHOE, the International House of Eggs, but that name didn’t do too well in marketing tests!

54. Shortest mo. : FEB

The name of the month February comes from the Latin word “februum” meaning “purification”. The Romans had a ritual named Februa (purification) on February 15th every year. I don’t think many people pronounce the first letter R in “February”, leaving it silent, but I could be wrong …

56. Eng. ship title : HMS

The ship prefix “HMS” is used by the warships of the Royal Navy, and stands for “Her/His Majesty’s Ship/Submarine”. The prefix “RMS” is used by ships of the merchant navy, and stands for “Royal Mail Ship/Steamer”.

57. __City: computer game : SIM

SimCity is a very clever computer game. Players build and grow cities and societies by creating the conditions necessary for people (the Sims) to move in and thrive. SimCity was launched in 1989, and to this day it is consistently ranked as one of the greatest computer games of all time.

64. Lethargy cause : ANEMIA

The term “anemia” (or “anaemia”, as we write it back in Ireland) comes from a Greek word meaning “lack of blood”. Anemia is a lack of iron in the blood, or a low red blood cell count. Tiredness is a symptom of the condition, and so we use the term “anemic” figuratively to mean “lacking in vitality or substance”.

66. Pain reliever : ANODYNE

Something described as “anodyne” is analgesic, capable of removing pain. “Anodyne” comes from the Greek “an-” meaning “without” and “odyne” meaning “pain”.

67. Daiquiri liquor : RUM

Daiquirí is a small village on the coast near Santiago, Cuba and a key location in the American invasion of Cuba during the Spanish-American War. Supposedly, the cocktail called a “Daiquiri” was invented by American mining engineers in a bar in nearby Santiago.

68. DDE opponent : AES

Adlai Stevenson (AES) ran for president unsuccessfully against Dwight D. Eisenhower (DDE) in 1952 and again in 1956. Some years after his second defeat, Stevenson served under President Kennedy (JFK) as Ambassador to the United Nations. Stevenson was always noted for his eloquence and he had a famous exchange in a UN Security Council meeting during the Cuban missile crisis. Stevenson bluntly demanded that the Soviet representative on the council tell the world if the USSR was installing nuclear weapons in Cuba. His words were “Don’t wait for the translation, answer ‘yes’ or ‘no’!” followed by “I am prepared to wait for my answer until Hell freezes over!”

70. Barely open : AJAR

Our word “ajar” is thought to come from Scottish dialect, in which “a char” means “slightly open”.

73. Köln cooler : EIS

In German, cubes of “eis” (ice) might be found in “ein Mixgetränk” (a mixed drink, cocktail).

Cologne is the fourth largest city in Germany, and is known as “Köln” in German.

74. Free : GRATIS

Something provided “gratis” is supplied free of charge. “Gratis” is a Latin term, a contraction of “gratiis” meaning “for thanks”.

75. Mariner’s home : SEATTLE

The Seattle Mariners (SEA) are one of only two Major League teams never to have appeared in a World Series. The other is the Washington Nationals. The Mariners are owned by the Nintendo Corporation of America, making them one of three Major League teams owned by businesses. The other two are the Atlanta Braves (owned by Liberty Media) and the Toronto Blue Jays (owned by Rogers Communications).

76. “Lord, is __?”: Matthew : IT I

At the Last Supper, Jesus told his apostles that one of them would betray him that day. According to the Gospel of Matthew:

And they were exceeding sorrowful, and began every one of them to say unto him, Lord, is it I?

80. Giant in nonstick pans : T-FAL

Tefal (also “T-Fal”) is a French manufacturer of cookware, famous for its nonstick line. The name “Tefal” is a portmanteau, of TEFlon and ALuminum, the key materials used in producing their pots and pans.

81. Call from the curb : HAIL

That would be hailing a taxi.

82. Six-sided state : UTAH

When viewed on a map of the US, the state of Utah has six sides. It’s almost shaped like a rectangle, but there is a “bite” out of that rectangle in the northeast corner of the state.

83. Country name that includes its own abbreviation : EIRE

“Éire”, is the Irish word for “Ireland”. The related “Erin” is an anglicized version of “Éire” and actually corresponds to “Éirinn”, the dative case of “Éire”.

Ireland (Ire.)

86. “Splish Splash” singer : DARIN

The singer Bobby Darin had a short but eventful life. Darin started in show business as a songwriter for Connie Francis. He then made it big as a performer with huge hits like “Splish Splash”, “Dream Lover”, “Mack the Knife” and “Beyond the Sea”. He was active politically as a supporter of Robert Kennedy, and was present in the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles when Kennedy was assassinated. Soon after, Darin found out that the people he thought were his parents, were in fact his grandparents. The woman he knew as his older sister was in fact his mother. Darin died following a heart operation at only 37 years old.

“Splish Splash” was a hit for Bobby Darin in 1958, and was the result of a bet. The first line (Splish splash, I was taking a bath) was suggested by Jean Kaufman, the mother of disk jockey “Murray the K”. Murray wagered that Darin couldn’t write a song beginning with those words. Darin won the bet …

97. City east of El Paso : ODESSA

The city of Odessa, Texas has as its symbol the jack rabbit. This is because from the thirties through the seventies the city hosted a rodeo for roping rabbits. The Humane Society applied pressure and the city did away with the tradition in 1977.

Although there have been human settlements in the El Paso area for thousands of years, the first European settlement was founded in 1659 by the Spanish. That first community was on the south bank of the Rio Grande, and was called El Paso del Norte (the North Pass). Most of the urban development under Spanish rule took place on the south side of the river, with El Paso del Norte acting as the center of governance for the Spanish for the territory of New Mexico. The Rio Grande was chosen as the border between Mexico and the US in 1848, so most of the city of El Paso del Norte became part of the Mexican state of Chihuahua (and is now called Ciudad Juárez ). The area north of the river developed as a US military post, eventually becoming the modern city of El Paso, Texas.

102. “Law & Order: SVU” actor : ICE-T

Rapper Ice-T must be sick of having his name come up as an answer in crossword puzzles (I know I am!). Born Tracy Marrow, Ice-T has been interested in acting for decades and made his film debut in the 1984 movie about breakdancing called “Breakin’”. He has also played Detective Fin Tutuola in the TV show “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit” since the year 2000.

103. Sandwich side : SLAW

The term “coleslaw” is an Anglicized version of the Dutch name “koolsla”, which in itself is a shortened form of “Koolsalade” meaning “cabbage salad”.

Meats placed between slices of bread was first called a sandwich in the 18th century, named after the Fourth Earl of Sandwich. The Earl was fond of eating “sandwiches” while playing cards at his club.

104. Indian garment : SARI

The item of clothing called a “sari” (also “saree”) is a strip of cloth, as one might imagine, unusual perhaps in that is unstitched along the whole of its length. The strip of cloth can range from four to nine meters long (that’s a lot of material!). The sari is usually wrapped around the waist, then draped over the shoulder leaving the midriff bare. I must say, it can be a beautiful item of clothing.

110. Bit of defiance, in slang : ‘TUDE

‘Tude (attitude)

111. Gulf States prince : EMIR

An emir is a prince or chieftain, one most notably from the Middle East. In English, “emir” can also be written variously as “emeer, amir, ameer” (watch out for those spellings in crosswords!).

112. “Last four” ID verifiers : SSNS

So often, we are asked for “the last four digits” of our Social Security Numbers (SSNs).

A Social Security number (SSN) is divided into three parts i.e AAA-GG-SSSS, Originally, the Area Number (AAA) was the code for the office that issued the card. Since 1973, the Area Number reflects the ZIP code from which the application was made. The GG in the SSN is the Group Number, and the SSSS in the number is the Serial Number. However, this is all moot. Since 2011 SSNs are assigned randomly. However, some random numbers have been excluded from use, i.e. Area Numbers 000, 666 (!) and 900-999.

115. Sea-Tac abbr. : ARR

Arrival (arr.)

Sea-Tac Airport (SEA) is more fully known as Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. Sea-Tac is the main hub for Alaska Airlines.

116. Agnus __ : DEI

“Agnus Dei” is Latin for “Lamb of God”, a term used in Christian faiths for Jesus Christ, symbolizing his role as a sacrificial offering to atone for the sins of man.

118. Oil-rich fed. : UAE

The United Arab Emirates (UAE) is a federation of seven emirates (states) in the Middle East. Included in the seven are Abu Dhabi and Dubai, with the city of Abu Dhabi being the UAE capital and cultural center.

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Ohm reciprocal : SIEMENS
8. With 123-Across, speaker of the quip : STEVEN …
14. Hybrid tableware : SPORK
19. Black Sea country : ROMANIA
20. Poke holes in, as a lawn : AERATE
21. Judge of the Yankees : AARON
22. Start of a quip : I WENT TO …
23. Beauty goddesses : GRACES
24. Crunchy snack : FRITO
25. Big Apple restaurateur : SARDI
26. Chef’s amts. : TBSPS
28. Dexterity : SLEIGHT
30. “Wedding Bell Blues” soloist Marilyn : MCCOO
32. Org. with an Acid Rain Program : EPA
35. Three before kappa : ETA
36. Quip, part 2 : … A MUSEUM WHERE THEY HAVE …
45. Monotony metaphor : RUT
46. Heads of the Sorbonne : TETES
47. Sticker : THORN
48. Evil Luthor : LEX
49. Bring out : ELICIT
52. NYC line that stops at Yankee Stadium, familiarly : IRT
53. Truce : CEASEFIRE
55. Quip, part 3 : … ALL THE HEADS AND …
58. Glee club member : TENOR
59. Expected results : NORMS
60. “__ so you!” : IT’S
61. Out of shape : BENT
62. Boise’s st. : IDA
65. Email afterthoughts : PSS
66. Quip, part 4 : … ARMS …
68. Short alias? : AKA
71. European carrier : SAS
72. Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge denizen : NENE
74. Safari beast : GNU
75. Maestro Ozawa : SEIJI
77. Shrek creator William : STEIG
79. Quip, part 5 : … FROM THE STATUES ….
85. “My mom’s gonna kill me!” : I AM SO DEAD!
87. Air traffic mgmt. group : FAA
88. Arts section regular : CRITIC
89. __-fi : SCI
90. Frayed : TATTY
91. Either of two hearth borders? : AITCH
93. Altar constellation : ARA
94. Quip, part 6 : … THAT ARE IN ALL THE OTHER …
99. Rhyming boxer : ALI
100. Work with thread : SEW
101. Calrissian of “Star Wars” films : LANDO
102. Putting out : ISSUING
106. Laker or Raptor, briefly : NBAER
109. Bass-baritone Simon : ESTES
113. Trolley sound : CLANG
114. Lowest points : NADIRS
117. End of the quip : … MUSEUMS
119. “War of the Worlds” target : EARTH
120. Play areas : ARENAS
121. Entered stealthily, perhaps : EASED IN
122. __ tie : TWIST
123. See 8-Across : … WRIGHT
124. Letters-to-the-editor writers : READERS

Down

1. Indian titles : SRIS
2. State admitted to the Union after Texas : IOWA
3. Hosp. “room” : EMER
4. 400+ million of them are produced daily : M AND MS
5. Draw in : ENTICE
6. Insignificant point : NIT
7. Príncipe’s island partner : SAO TOME
8. Droops : SAGS
9. Former ACC Cavalier rival : TERP
10. Old-fashioned editing tool : ERASER
11. Little sucker? : VAC
12. Seine summer : ETE
13. Loch with a legend : NESS
14. Circus security : SAFETY NET
15. Outcast : PARIAH
16. One may be left in a copier: Abbr. : ORIG
17. __ IRA : ROTH
18. One in a sailor’s repertoire : KNOT
27. Dressy pasta? : BOW TIES
29. Creepy looks : LEERS
31. Fast sailing ships : CUTTERS
33. Subjects of many online videos : PET CATS
34. Balkan capital : ATHENS
36. Geographical measure : AREA
37. Think (over) : MULL
38. Elec., e.g. : UTIL
39. Mount Olympus VIP : HERA
40. Town line sign abbr. : ESTD
41. 1950s tennis great Lew : HOAD
42. Dior creations : A-LINES
43. Shakespearean title city : VERONA
44. Applies, as pressure : EXERTS
50. Whse. unit : CTN
51. Chain with syrup choices : IHOP
54. Shortest mo. : FEB
56. Eng. ship title : HMS
57. __City: computer game : SIM
62. Refuse to bargain : INSIST
63. Separate : DETACH
64. Lethargy cause : ANEMIA
66. Pain reliever : ANODYNE
67. Daiquiri liquor : RUM
68. DDE opponent : AES
69. Cooking show title word : KITCHEN
70. Barely open : AJAR
73. Köln cooler : EIS
74. Free : GRATIS
75. Mariner’s home : SEATTLE
76. “Lord, is __?”: Matthew : IT I
78. Matchless one’s question : GOT A LIGHT?
79. Many a political party : FETE
80. Giant in nonstick pans : T-FAL
81. Call from the curb : HAIL
82. Six-sided state : UTAH
83. Country name that includes its own abbreviation : EIRE
84. Permanent mark : SCAR
86. “Splish Splash” singer : DARIN
92. Con artist, often : CHARMER
95. Jeers : TAUNTS
96. Street shader : AWNING
97. City east of El Paso : ODESSA
98. How uncut grass goes : TO SEED
102. “Law & Order: SVU” actor : ICE-T
103. Sandwich side : SLAW
104. Indian garment : SARI
105. Work on, as a bone : GNAW
107. Buddy, in slang : BRAH
108. No. 2 : ASST
110. Bit of defiance, in slang : ‘TUDE
111. Gulf States prince : EMIR
112. “Last four” ID verifiers : SSNS
115. Sea-Tac abbr. : ARR
116. Agnus __ : DEI
118. Oil-rich fed. : UAE

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11 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword 6 Jan 19, Sunday”

  1. LAT: 25:47, no errors. Newsday: 17:19, no errors. Washington Post later, probably this evening …

    @Jennifer … My sister reported back with a very newsy email, but it turns out that she also doesn’t remember any members of your family from her time in Mason City. So … there it is … 😜

    1. Washington Post: 24:06, no errors. Enjoyable and not too difficult, but it would have been a lot easier if I hadn’t stopped watching TV a couple of decades ago … 😜. The WP Sunday puzzles are highly variable; I never know quite what to expect … 😳.

  2. 34 mins 48 sec, DNF. Completed maybe 85%. In addition to being based on a “quip” where each word could literally be **anything**, this puzzle was laced with incredibly bad clue editing. I don’t know how many times I uttered “WTF??” in complete bafflement.

    I don’t know if it’s art or what, but it surely isn’t a good crossword. This constructor goes on my “sh*t list”.

  3. One hour 27 min. and 22 sec. With no errors.
    Guess who just discovered that I have a timer on my I pad?
    91 across (aitch) I got it by crosses but don’t understand it even with Bills explanation .
    This was my only completed puzzle of the weekend.
    The answer to guess who is me.

  4. A “fete” is a celebration, hence a political party. “Aitch” is how the letter “h” is written. Hearth starts and ends with an “h,” thus on both borders (edges).

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