LA Times Crossword Answers 15 Jul 2018, Sunday

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Constructed by: Joe Kidd
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Watt’s Happening

Themed answers are common phrases with a letter W inserted (NB: W is the abbreviation for “Watt”, the unit of power).

  • 24A. Unsteady walk while using social media? : TWEETER-TOTTER (from “teeter-totter”)
  • 38A. Lowly short-order cook? : FRYING PAWN (from “frying pan”)
  • 58A. Bawdier Bavarian britches? : LEWDER HOSEN (from “Lederhosen”)
  • 79A. Beefcake’s breakfast : BRAWN FLAKES (from “bran flakes”)
  • 98A. Return from a salamander farm? : NEWT PROFIT (from “net profit”)
  • 116A. Drawback of the best place to watch the fight? : RINGSIDE SWEAT (from “ringside seat”)
  • 3D. Dessert for a large legal firm? : TRIPLE-LAWYER CAKE (from “triple layer cake”)
  • 42D. Number for the weight-conscious? : LOW-CAL ANESTHETIC (from “local anesthetic”)

Bill’s time: 22m 16s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

7. Arnold’s Terminator, e.g. : CYBORG

“Cyborg” is an abbreviation for “cybernetic organism”, a being that is made up of both organic and synthetic parts.

The 1984 movie “The Terminator” was directed by James Cameron. It was a relatively low-budget production, costing $6.4 million, but has grossed around $80 million to date. No wonder the Terminator said “I’ll be back” …

18. Some ski lodges : A-FRAMES

An A-frame house is one that has a steeply-angled roof, one forming the shape of the letter “A”. The A-frame design is popular in snowy regions, as the roof is so steeply pitched that it does not collect snow.

20. Longhorn rivals : SOONERS

They would be the Texas Longhorns and Oklahoma Sooners.

The 1889 Indian Appropriations Act officially opened up the so called Unassigned Lands, land in Oklahoma on which no Native American tribes had settled. Once the Act was signed, those lands became available for settlement. Those people that settled the same lands illegally, prior the date specified, they were termed “Sooners” as their situation was defined in the “sooner clause” of the Act. “Sooner State” is now a nickname for Oklahoma.

22. __ Island : CONEY

Cony (or “coney”) is an old English word for rabbit or rabbit fur, and Coney Island in New York takes its name from the same root. The Dutch used the name “Conyne Eylandt” (Rabbit Island) after the large population of rabbits that was hunted there.

23. Pratt & Whitney helicopter engine with two power sections : TWIN-PAC

The Twin-Pac is a turboshaft engine made by Pratt & Whitney Canada that is used in helicopters such as the Bell 212, UH-1N Twin Huey and the Sikorsky H-34. The name “Twin-Pac” is a reference to the twin power turbines that drive a common output gearbox.

Pratt & Whitney is a huge manufacturer of aircraft engines that competes with General Electric and Roll-Royce. The company is headquartered in East Hartford, Connecticut.

26. Fuel for a lorry : PETROL

“Petrol” is the chiefly British English term for “gasoline”. “Petrol” comes via French from the Latin “petroleum”, itself derived from “petra” meaning “rock” and “oleum” meaning “oil”.

On the other side of the Atlantic, a truck is called a “lorry”, a term that probably comes from the English dialectal verb “to lurry” meaning “to drag, tug”.

28. Leslie Caron title role : LILI

“Lili” is 1953 musical film starring Leslie Caron in the title role, a naive French orphan girl. A famous song from the movie is “Hi-Lili, Hi-Lo”.

The beautiful and talented French actress and dancer Leslie Caron is best known for her appearances in the classic Hollywood musical films “An American in Paris”, “Lili” and “Gigi”. Although I love the movie “Gigi”, my favorite of her performances is in the comedy war drama “Father Goose” in which she played opposite Cary Grant. Caron has danced with the best, including Gene Kelly, Fred Astaire, Mikhail Baryshnikov and Rudolf Nureyev.

30. Field in acting : SALLY

Actress Sally Field first came to the public’s attention in the sixties with title roles in the TV shows “Gidget” and “The Flying Nun”. She has two Best Actress Oscars: one for “Norma Rae” (1979) and one for “Places in the Heart” (1984).

32. Detroit labor org. : UAW

The United Auto Workers (UAW) was founded to represent workers in auto plants in the Detroit area in 1935. Nowadays the UAW’s membership extends into the aerospace, agriculture and other industries.

37. It tops a deuce : TREY

A trey is a three in a deck of cards. The term “trey” can also be used for a domino with three pips, and even a three-point play in basketball.

41. 24 minutes, in the NBA : HALF

An NBA basketball game comprises four, 12-minute quarters. That 48-minutes of actual play time is frequently interrupted though, so a typical NBA game lasts 2-2½ hours.

44. Tommy’s kid brother on “Rugrats” : DIL

Tommy Pickles is the protagonist on the Nickelodeon cartoon show “Rugrats”. Dil Pickles is Tommy’s younger brother.

45. Marquis __ : DE SADE

The Marquis de Sade was a French aristocrat with a reputation for a libertine lifestyle. De Sade was also a writer, well known for his works of erotica. He fell foul of the law for some of his more extreme practices and for blaspheming the Catholic church. On an off, de Sade spent 32 years of his life in prison and in insane asylums.

48. 1840s Rhode Island rebellion leader Thomas : DORR

Thomas Wilson Dorr led the Dorr Rebellion of 1841-42 in Rhode Island. At issue was the limited right to vote in the state, as only landowners could do so at that time. Soon after the rebellion, suffrage was extended to any free man who could pay a poll tax of $1.

50. In short order : ANON

“Anon” originally meant “at once”, but the term’s meaning evolved into “soon” apparently just because the word was misused over time.

52. Nasty storm : NOR’EASTER

A nor’easter is a storm that blows from the northeast.

56. Popeye’s __’Pea : SWEE

Originally Popeye used the nickname “Swee’pea” to address his girlfriend Olive Oyl. Then along comes a baby, found on Popeye’s doorstep.

58. Bawdier Bavarian britches? : LEWDER HOSEN (from “Lederhosen”)

“Lederhosen” is the German word for leather breeches, traditional garments worn by males in Bavaria and Austria.

60. X x XXX : CCC

In Roman numerals, X x XXX = CCC (10 x 30 = 300).

61. Storage compartments : BAYS

A bay is an opening or recessed space in a wall, and especially an opening between two columns. This usage of “bay” comes from the Old French “baee” meaning “opening, hole”. Derivative terms include “bay window” and “sick-bay”.

62. Sandburg’s “little cat feet” arrival : FOG

Writer and editor Carl Sandburg was heading to an interview with a judge one morning when he was taken by a view of the fog lingering over the Chicago harbor. He had to sit waiting forty minutes for the judge to turn up, so he wrote a poem called “Fog”.

THE fog comes
on little cat feet.

It sits looking
over harbor and city
on silent haunches
and then moves on.

63. Mauna __ : KEA

Mauna Kea is a dormant volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii, the peak of which is the highest point in the whole state. Mauna Kea is in effect the tip of a gigantic volcano rising up from the seabed.

66. Intellectual : IDEAMONGER

The suffix “-monger” indicates a dealer or trader. For example. A fishmonger sells fish, an ironmonger sells hardware, and an ideamonger deals in ideas..

77. Fannie __: securities : MAES

The Federal National Mortgage Association is commonly called “Fannie Mae”, a play on the initialism FNMA. Fannie Mae was founded in during the Great Depression as part of President Roosevelt’s New Deal.

78. Frodo pursuer : ORC

Orcs are mythical humanoid creatures that appear in the writings of J. R. R. Tolkien. Since Tolkien’s use of orcs, they have also been featured in other fantasy fiction and in fantasy games.

Frodo Baggins is a principal character in J. R. R. Tolkien’s “The Lord of the Rings”. Frodo is a Hobbit, and is charged with the quest of destroying Sauron’s Ring in the fires of Mount Doom. Frodo is portrayed by American actor Elijah Wood in Peter Jackson’s film adaptations of the novels.

79. Beefcake’s breakfast : BRAWN FLAKES (from “bran flakes”)

It’s not really clear how the “cheesecake” came to be used for a provocative picture of a woman. It is known that the term arose in the 1930s, and originally applied to to the covers of pulp magazines that used the images of the attractive young females to attract a largely male audience. One theory is that during the depression years, the luscious cheesecake dessert was unattainable, as were the “luscious” models depicted on the magazine covers. The male equivalent of “cheesecake” is “beefcake”.

84. Ilsa __: “Casablanca” heroine : LUND

Ilsa Lund was played by Ingrid Bergman in the 1942 movie “Casablanca”. I love the words of one critic describing the chemistry between Bogart and Bergman in this film: “She paints his face with her eyes”. Wow …

85. “… giant __ for mankind” : LEAP

Neil Armstrong was the most private of individuals. You didn’t often see him giving interviews, unlike so many of the more approachable astronauts of the Apollo space program. His famous, “That’s one small step for (a) man, one giant leap for mankind” statement; that was something that he came up with himself, while Apollo 11 was making its way to the moon.

87. Like top Michelin ratings : THREE-STAR

Michelin is a manufacturer of tires that is based in France. The company was founded by brothers Édouard and André Michelin in 1888. The brothers were running a rubber factory at the time, and invented the world’s first removable pneumatic tire, an invention that they used to launch their new company. Michelin is also noted for rating restaurants and accommodation in its famous Michelin Travel Guides, awarding coveted Michelin “stars”.

88. Toondom’s Le Pew : PEPE

Pepé Le Pew is a very likeable cartoon character from the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series. Pepé is a French skunk, first introduced way back in 1945. He is always thinking of “l’amour” and chases the lady skunks, or a black cat with a white stripe accidentally painted down her back.

89. Flood barrier : DIKE

A dike is an embankment, usually made of earth and rock, that is used to prevent floods.

93. Maple extract : SAP

About 75% of the world’s maple syrup comes from the province of Quebec. The US’s biggest producer is the state of Vermont, which produces 5-6% of the world’s supply.

98. Return from a salamander farm? : NEWT PROFIT (from “net profit”)

Salamanders are lizard-like amphibians found in all across the northern hemisphere. They are the only vertebrate animals that can regenerate lost limbs.

102. Work unit: Abbr. : FT-LB

The foot-pound (ft-lb) is an imperial unit of work or energy. One foot-pound is the amount of work in applying a one pound-force over a distance of one foot.

103. __ Bo : TAE

Tae Bo isn’t an ancient martial art, even though it perhaps sounds like one. The discipline was developed as a form of aerobic exercise in the 1990s by taekwondo expert Billy Blanks who gave it the name Tae Bo, a melding of “taekwondo” and “boxing”.

106. PC hookup : LAN

Local Area Network (LAN)

107. Thai currency : BAHTS

The baht is the currency of Thailand, and is subdivided into 100 satang.

112. Kristen of “Bridesmaids” : WIIG

Kristen Wiig is a comic actress who appears on “Saturday Night Live”. She also made an appearance on the first season of Spike TV’s quirky “The Joe Schmo Show”, playing “Dr. Pat”. More recently, she co-wrote and starred in the 2011 hit film “Bridesmaids”, and co-starred in the 2016 reboot of “Ghostbusters”.

“Bridesmaids” is a 2011 comedy movie co-written by and starring Kristen Wiig. I wasn’t crazy about this film until Chris O’Dowd turned up as a traffic cop. Wiig and O’Dowd were great together, I thought. Pity about the rest of the movie …

116. Drawback of the best place to watch the fight? : RINGSIDE SWEAT (from “ringside seat”)

Ugh …

122. En pointe, in ballet : ON TOE

“En pointe” is a French term used to describe the ballet technique of dancing on the tips of the toes, while wearing specialized “pointe shoes”.

126. Some Dadaist paintings : ERNSTS

Max Ernst was a painter and sculptor, and a pioneer in the Dada movement and Surrealism. Ernst was born near Cologne in Germany in 1891 and he was called up to fight in WWI, as were most young German men at that time. In his autobiography he writes “Max Ernst died the 1st of August, 1914” a statement about his experiences in the war. In reality, Ernst died in 1976 having lived to the ripe old age of 85.

Down

2. Agric. labor group : UFW

The United Farm Workers of America (UFW) is a labor union formed by the merger of the Agricultural Workers Organizing Committee (AWOC) and the National Farm Workers Association (NFWA). The latter was the union led by Mexican American labor leader Cesar Chavez.

7. Wisconsin winter hrs. : CST

Central Standard Time (CST)

9. Enola Gay manufacturer : BOEING

The Boeing Company was founded in Seattle in 1916 by aviation pioneer William Boeing, with the enterprise’s first name being “Pacific Aero Products Co.” Boeing had worked in the timber industry and set up his aircraft company in the Pacific Northwest to take advantage of the local supply of spruce wood.

The Enola Gay was the B-29 that dropped the first atomic bomb, on Hiroshima in August 1945. Enola Gay was the name of the mother of pilot Col. Paul W. Tibbets, Jr.

11. Eye layer : RETINA

The retina is the tissue that lines the inside of the eye, and is the tissue that is light-sensitive. There are (mainly) two types of cell in the retina that are sensitive to light, one called rods and the other cones. Rods are cells that best function in very dim light and only provide black-and-white vision. Cones on the other hand function in brighter light and can perceive color.

12. M.A. seeker’s hurdle : GRE

Passing the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is usually a requirement for entry into graduate school here in the US.

13. Ben Nevis, e.g. : SCOTCH

Ben Nevis scotch whisky is a produced in a distillery that sits at the base of Ben Nevis, which is the highest mountain in Britain.

16. Road sign ruminant : DEER

Animals that “chew the cud” are called ruminants. Ruminants eat vegetable matter but cannot extract any nutritional value from cellulose without the help of microbes in the gut. Ruminants collect roughage in the first part of the alimentary canal, allowing microbes to work on it. The partially digested material (the cud) is regurgitated into the mouth so that the ruminant can chew the food more completely exposing more surface area for microbes to do their work.

17. Thornfield Hall governess : EYRE

Thornfield Hall is the home of Mr. Rochester, and where much of the action takes place in Charlotte Brontë’s novel “Jane Eyre”. Ultimately, Thornfield is destroyed by fire, a fire in which Mr. Rochester loses a hand and his eyesight.

25. “Didn’t wanna know that!” : TMI

Too much information! (TMI)

27. Bomb big-time : LAY AN EGG

Apparently the expression “to lay an egg”, meaning “to perform or play really badly” comes from the resemblance of the number 0 to an egg. One laying an egg scores zero.

31. Radio host Shapiro : ARI

Ari Shapiro served very ably as White House correspondent for National Public Radio (NPR) for several years. He then became a co-host of network’s drive-time program “All Things Considered” in 2015.

42. Number for the weight-conscious? : LOW-CAL ANESTHETIC (from “local anesthetic”)

“Aisthesis” is the Greek word for “feeling”, from which “anaisthesia” is Greek for “want of feeling, lack of sensation”. And that’s how we get our English term “anesthesia”.

43. Like Howdy Doody’s face : FRECKLED

“Howdy Doody” is a children’s TV show that originally aired from 1947 to 1960. The show featured live actors as well as a whole host of puppet characters. There was also the Peanut Gallery, an invited audience of about 40 kids who sat on bleachers on stage while the show was airing.

54. Warring son of Zeus : ARES

The Greek god Ares is often referred to as the Olympian god of warfare, but originally he was regarded as the god of bloodlust and slaughter. Ares united with Aphrodite to create several gods, including Phobos (Fear), Deimos (Terror) and Eros (Desire). Ares was the son of Zeus and Hera, and the Roman equivalent to Ares was Mars.

55. Bygone Persian title : SHAH

The last Shah of Iran was Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi, as he was overthrown in the revolution led by the Ayatollah Khomeini in 1979. The post-revolution government sought the extradition of the Shah back to Iran while he was in the United States seeking medical care (he had cancer). His prolonged stay in the United States, recovering from surgery, caused some unrest back in Iran and resentment towards the United States. Some say that this resentment precipitated the storming of the US Embassy in Tehran and the resulting hostage crisis.

Before 1935, the country we know today as Iran was referred to as Persia by the Western world. The official name of the country since the Iranian Revolution of 1979 is the “Islamic Republic of Iran”.

58. Actor Chaney : LON

Lon Chaney, Sr. played a lot of crazed-looking characters in the days of silent movies. He did much of his own make-up work, developing the grotesque appearances that became his trademark, and earning himself the nickname “the man of a thousand faces”. Most famous were his portrayals of the title characters in the films “The Hunchback of Notre Dame” (1923) and “The Phantom of the Opera” (1925).

59. Disturbing bank msg. : NSF

Not sufficient funds (NSF)

61. Like some closet doors : BIFOLD

In Old French a “clos” was an enclosure, with the diminutive form “closet” describing a small enclosure or private room. Over time this evolved into our modern usage of “closet”, describing a cabinet or cupboard.

62. Last down : FOURTH

That would be football.

65. Exaggerate on stage : HAM UP

The word “ham”, describing a performer who overacts, is a shortened form of “hamfatter” and dates back to the late 1800s. “Hamfatter” comes from a song in old minstrel shows called “The Ham-Fat Man”. It seems that a poorly performing actor was deemed to have the “acting” qualities of a minstrel made up in blackface.

68. Coastal raptor : ERNE

“Raptor” is a generic term for a bird of prey, one that has talons to grip its victims.

71. Met regular : OPERA FAN

The Metropolitan Opera (often simply “the Met”) of New York City is the largest classical music organization in the country, presenting about 220 performances each and every year. Founded in 1880, the Met is renowned for using technology to expand its audiences. Performances have been broadcast live on radio since 1931, and on television since 1977. And since 2006 you can go see a live performance from New York in high definition on the big screen, at a movie theater near you …

72. Dorm VIPs : RAS

RAs are resident assistants or resident advisers, the peer leaders found in residence halls, particularly on a college campus.

75. Polite online letters : PLS

Please (pls.)

80. “Two owls and __”: Lear limerick line : A HEN

Here’s a limerick from the pen of nonsense poet Edward Lear:

There was an Old Man with a beard,
Who said, “It is just as I feared!—
Two Owls and a Hen, four Larks and a Wren,
Have all built their nests in my beard.

83. Pope John Paul II’s given name : KAROL

Pope John Paul II led the Catholic Church from 1978 until 2005, a period of over 26 years. That made him the second longest serving Pope in history, after Pius IX who reigned for over 31 years in the mid 1800s. Paradoxically, John Paul II’s predecessor was John Paul I who only ruled for 33 days. John Paul II was a native of Poland, and was the first non-Italian Pope to lead the church since 1523. His birth name was Karol Wojtyla.

86. Big brass container? : PENTAGON

The incredible building known as the Pentagon was built during WWII, and dedicated on January 15, 1943. It is the largest office building in the world (by floor space) covering an area of about 6.5 million square feet. As it was built during the war years, a major requirement was that it use a minimum amount of steel. That steel shortage dictated that the building be no more than four stories in height, and hence cover an awful lot of real estate.

95. “Masterpiece” airer : PBS

PBS’s wonderful “Masterpiece Theatre” changed its name to “Masterpiece” in 2008. At the same time, three different versions of the show were introduced:

  • “Masterpiece Classic” introduced by Gillian Anderson, and then Laura Linney
  • “Masterpiece Mystery!” introduced by Alan Cumming
  • “Masterpiece Contemporary” introduced by Matthew Goode, and then David Tennant

97. Word processing function : TAB SET

Like most features on our computer keyboards, the tab key is a hangover from the days of typewriters. When using a typewriter, making entries into a table was very tedious, involving lots of tapping on the spacebar and backspace key. So, a lever was added to typewriters that allowed the operator to “jump” across the page to positions that could be set by hand. Later this was simplified to a tab key which could be depressed, causing the carriage to jump to the next tab stop in much the same way that the modern tab key works on a computer.

100. Formosa, now : TAIWAN

Prior to 1945, the island that we know today as Taiwan was called “Formosa”, the Portuguese word for “beautiful”. Portuguese sailors gave the island this name when they spotted it in 1544. The official name for the state of Taiwan is the “Republic of China”.

102. Bluebeard’s last wife : FATIMA

“Bluebeard” is a folktale from France about a wealthy man who marries several times, and kills each of his wives. That is, until his last wife Fatima is rescued by her siblings who murder the murderer. Fatima inherits her husband’s fortune, doles out some riches to the siblings, and eventually falls in love and remarries.

104. Rooter for the Bulldogs : ELI

The Yale Bulldogs are the athletic teams of Yale University. The Yale school mascot is “Handsome Dan”, the Yale bulldog. The Bulldogs’ logo features a bulldog in front of a letter Y.

107. Picture book pachyderm : BABAR

“Babar the Elephant” originated in France, a creation of Jean de Brunhoff in 1931. The first book was “Histoire de Babar”, a book so successful it was translated into English two years later for publication in Britain and the US. Jean de Brunhoff wrote six more Babar stories before he died in 1937, and then his son Laurent continued his father’s work.

A pachyderm is a large mammal noted for having very thick skin and hooves, or nails resembling hooves. In terms of taxonomy, animals such as elephants, rhinoceroses and hippopotamuses used to be classified in the order Pachydermata (from the Greek for “thick” and “skin”). That order is now obsolete, as it has been shown that the aforementioned “pachyderms” do not in fact share a common ancestor. Despite the reclassification, “pachyderm” persists in common, non-scientific usage.

109. Director Wertmüller : LINA

Lina Wertmüller was an Italian movie director of Swiss descent. Wertmüller was the first woman ever to receive an Academy Award nomination for directing. She won for her 1975 film “Seven Beauties”.

110. QBs’ stats : INTS

Interception (Int.)

111. Mag honchos : EDS

“Honcho” is a slang term used for a leader. The word comes to us from Japanese, in which language a “hancho” is a squad (han) leader (cho).

115. Norman on the links : GREG

Greg Norman is an Australian golfer who spent a long time ranked as the world’s number one in the eighties and nineties. Off the golf course, Norman is a very, very successful businessman. One of his more visible ventures is his winery called Greg Norman Estates.

118. Shipping wts. : TNS

Here in the US, a ton is equivalent to 2,000 pounds. Over in the UK, a ton is 2,240 pounds. The UK unit is sometimes referred to as an Imperial ton or sometimes a “long ton”. Folks over there refer to the US ton then as a “short ton”. To further complicate matters, there is also a “metric ton” or “tonne”, which is equivalent to 2,204 pounds. Personally, I wish we’d just stick to kilograms …

121. Some NFL linemen : RGS

In football, right guards (RGs) protect the quarterback (QB).

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Beginning : OUTSET
7. Arnold’s Terminator, e.g. : CYBORG
13. Arboretum feature : SHADE
18. Some ski lodges : A-FRAMES
20. Longhorn rivals : SOONERS
22. __ Island : CONEY
23. Pratt & Whitney helicopter engine with two power sections : TWIN-PAC
24. Unsteady walk while using social media? : TWEETER-TOTTER (from “teeter-totter”)
26. Fuel for a lorry : PETROL
28. Leslie Caron title role : LILI
29. “Count me in!” : I’M THERE!
30. Field in acting : SALLY
32. Detroit labor org. : UAW
34. Prefix meaning “billionth” : NANO-
36. In reserve, with “on” : ICE
37. It tops a deuce : TREY
38. Lowly short-order cook? : FRYING PAWN (from “frying pan”)
41. 24 minutes, in the NBA : HALF
44. Tommy’s kid brother on “Rugrats” : DIL
45. Marquis __ : DE SADE
46. Enjoy courses : EAT
48. 1840s Rhode Island rebellion leader Thomas : DORR
50. In short order : ANON
52. Nasty storm : NOR’EASTER
56. Popeye’s __’Pea : SWEE
57. Victorious shout : I WON!
58. Bawdier Bavarian britches? : LEWDER HOSEN (from “Lederhosen”)
60. X x XXX : CCC
61. Storage compartments : BAYS
62. Sandburg’s “little cat feet” arrival : FOG
63. Mauna __ : KEA
64. Trembling : ASHAKE
66. Intellectual : IDEAMONGER
70. Deficiencies : SHORTFALLS
73. Words with a gift : FOR YOU
74. Lambaste : RIP
76. Yield as a return : PAY
77. Fannie __: securities : MAES
78. Frodo pursuer : ORC
79. Beefcake’s breakfast : BRAWN FLAKES (from “bran flakes”)
84. Ilsa __: “Casablanca” heroine : LUND
85. “… giant __ for mankind” : LEAP
87. Like top Michelin ratings : THREE-STAR
88. Toondom’s Le Pew : PEPE
89. Flood barrier : DIKE
90. “Ahem” relative : HEY
91. Spoke : ORATED
93. Maple extract : SAP
96. Big top, for one : TENT
98. Return from a salamander farm? : NEWT PROFIT (from “net profit”)
102. Work unit: Abbr. : FT-LB
103. __ Bo : TAE
105. Stadium reaction : ROAR
106. PC hookup : LAN
107. Thai currency : BAHTS
108. Easily bent : PLIABLE
112. Kristen of “Bridesmaids” : WIIG
114. Nullify : NEGATE
116. Drawback of the best place to watch the fight? : RINGSIDE SWEAT (from “ringside seat”)
119. Dispute decider : ARBITER
122. En pointe, in ballet : ON TOE
123. Give an oath to : SWEAR IN
124. Enlarging, as a hole : REAMING
125. Contradictory word : WASN’T
126. Some Dadaist paintings : ERNSTS
127. Brings honor to : GRACES

Down

1. Bit in a horse’s mouth? : OAT
2. Agric. labor group : UFW
3. Dessert for a large legal firm? : TRIPLE-LAWYER CAKE (from “triple layer cake”)
4. In a reasonable manner : SANELY
5. What “E” may mean : EMPTY
6. Get emotional, with “up” : TEAR
7. Wisconsin winter hrs. : CST
8. Distressed cry : YOWL
9. Enola Gay manufacturer : BOEING
10. Track circuit : ONE LAP
11. Eye layer : RETINA
12. M.A. seeker’s hurdle : GRE
13. Ben Nevis, e.g. : SCOTCH
14. Easily riled types : HOTHEADS
15. It’s tossed into a pot : ANTE
16. Road sign ruminant : DEER
17. Thornfield Hall governess : EYRE
19. Searches carefully : SCOURS
21. Indian term of respect : SRI
25. “Didn’t wanna know that!” : TMI
27. Bomb big-time : LAY AN EGG
30. Like A/C in most cars : STD
31. Radio host Shapiro : ARI
33. Heiress, perhaps : WIDOW
35. Have credit from : OWE TO
38. Marshland : FEN
39. Uncool one who lately is sort of cool : NERD
40. Scot’s nots : NAES
42. Number for the weight-conscious? : LOW-CAL ANESTHETIC (from “local anesthetic”)
43. Like Howdy Doody’s face : FRECKLED
45. Crime boss : DON
47. Accord : TREATY
49. Judge’s announcement : RECESS
51. Lack of influence : NO SAY
53. Comics scream : EEK!
54. Warring son of Zeus : ARES
55. Bygone Persian title : SHAH
57. “Don’t change anything!” : I ADORE IT!
58. Actor Chaney : LON
59. Disturbing bank msg. : NSF
61. Like some closet doors : BIFOLD
62. Last down : FOURTH
65. Exaggerate on stage : HAM UP
67. Crowd around : MOB
68. Coastal raptor : ERNE
69. Overflowing : RIFE
71. Met regular : OPERA FAN
72. Dorm VIPs : RAS
75. Polite online letters : PLS
80. “Two owls and __”: Lear limerick line : A HEN
81. More twisted : WRYER
82. Suffix for fabric : -ATOR
83. Pope John Paul II’s given name : KAROL
84. Went before : LED
86. Big brass container? : PENTAGON
88. Favored one : PET
92. Karaoke performer’s problem : TIN EAR
94. PC key under Z : ALT
95. “Masterpiece” airer : PBS
97. Word processing function : TAB SET
99. Humdinger : WOWSER
100. Formosa, now : TAIWAN
101. Buttinskies : PRIERS
102. Bluebeard’s last wife : FATIMA
104. Rooter for the Bulldogs : ELI
107. Picture book pachyderm : BABAR
108. Figurehead spot : PROW
109. Director Wertmüller : LINA
110. QBs’ stats : INTS
111. Mag honchos : EDS
113. Walk or trot : GAIT
115. Norman on the links : GREG
117. Girl in the pasture : EWE
118. Shipping wts. : TNS
120. Vegas-to-Denver dir. : ENE
121. Some NFL linemen : RGS

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