LA Times Crossword 30 Sep 18, Sunday

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Constructed by: Peter Koetters
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Power Play

Themed answers start with infractions that might lead to a hockey player ending up IN THE PENALTY BOX:

  • 117A. Temporarily disqualified due to an infraction that begins any of seven answers to starred clues : IN THE PENALTY BOX
  • 23A. *Electric vehicle need : CHARGING STATION
  • 39A. *Having a blowout sale : SLASHING PRICES
  • 59A. *Fish story theme : HOOKING THE BIG ONE
  • 81A. *Like a man resisting the urge to argue : HOLDING HIS TONGUE
  • 96A. *”Dead Poets Society” setting : BOARDING SCHOOL
  • 16D. *Pressurized undersea compartment : DIVING BELL
  • 74D. *Camping out, say : ROUGHING IT

Bill’s time: 12m 36s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

5. “Nixon in China” composer John : ADAMS

“Nixon in China” is an opera by John Adams, with a libretto by Alice Goodman. The piece was inspired by President Nixon’s famous visit to China in 1972.

14. Fragrant wood : CEDAR

Cedar is used for the manufacture of some wardrobes and chests as it has long been believed that the fragrant oil in the wood is a moth-repellent. However, whether or not cedar oil is actually effective at keeping moths away seems to be in doubt.

19. Goatee-stroking words : I SEE

A goatee is a beard formed by hair on just a man’s chin. The name probably comes from the tuft of hair seen on an adult goat.

20. Bank built for a rainy day : LEVEE

A levee is an artificial bank usually made of earth, running along the length of a river. A levee is designed to hold back river water at a time of potential flooding. “Levée” is the French word for “raised” and is an American term that originated in French-speaking New Orleans around 1720.

21. Pal of Grover : ELMO

The “Sesame Street” character named Elmo has a birthday every February 3rd, and on that birthday he always turns 3½ years old. The man behind/under Elmo on “Sesame Street” is Kevin Clash. If you want to learn more about Elmo and Clash, you can watch the 2011 documentary “Being Elmo: A Puppeteer’s Journey”.

22. It’s pressed for oil : OLIVE

Virgin olive oil is oil produced from olives with no chemical treatment involved in the production process at all. To be labelled “virgin”, the oil must have an acidity level of less than 2% and must be be judged to have “a good taste”. Extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) comes from virgin oil production, and is the portion with acidity levels of less than 0.8% acidity that is judged to have “superior taste”.

30. Hot belt, with “the” : TROPICS

The Earth has five geographical zones defined by the major circles of latitude:

  • The North Frigid Zone lies north of the Arctic Circle
  • The North Temperate Zone lies between the Arctic Circle and the Tropic of Cancer
  • The Torrid Zone lies between the two Tropical Circles
  • The South Temperate Zone lies between the Tropic of Capricorn and the Antarctic Circle
  • The South Frigid Zone lies south of the Antarctic Circle

32. “God Bless America” landscape word : PRAIRIES

Irving Berlin wrote “God Bless America” while serving with the US Army in 1918. Berlin didn’t come across an opportunity to publicize the song until just before WWII. He felt it was the right time to introduce a patriotic song, and famously gave it to singer Kate Smith for a broadcast on Armistice Day in 1938. The song was such a hit that there were even moves to have it adopted as a new national anthem.

38. Many a Snapchat user : TEEN

Snapchat is a messaging system that allows users to send photos and video clips to a limited list of recipients. The photos and clips, called “snaps”, can be viewed for only a few seconds before they are deleted from the recipient’s device, and from the Snapchat servers.

43. Long-nosed fish : GAR

“Gar” was originally the name given to a species of needlefish found in the North Atlantic. The term “gar” is now used to describe several species of fish with elongated bodies that inhabit North and Central America and the Caribbean. The gar is unusual in that it is often found in very brackish water. What I find interesting is that the gar’s swim bladders are vascularized so that they can actually function as lungs. Many species of gar can actually be seen coming to the surface and taking a gulp of air. This adaptation makes it possible for them to live in conditions highly unsuitable for other fish that rely on their gills to get oxygen out of the water. Indeed, quite interesting …

46. 1977 medical thriller : COMA

Robin Cook is a novelist from New York who writes thrillers dealing with medical situations. Cook’s first major novel “Coma” was made into a 1978 feature film directed by Michael Crichton and starring Geneviève Bujold and Michael Douglas. Cook is himself a physician and is currently on leave with the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.

56. Neatnik’s possible condition, briefly : OCD

Apparently, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is the fourth most commonly diagnosed mental disorder, making it about as prevalent as asthma.

58. Minute critter : AMEBA

An ameba (or “amoeba”, as we spell it back in Ireland) is a single-celled microorganism. The name comes from the Greek “amoibe”, meaning change. The name is quite apt, as the cell changes shape readily as the ameba moves, eats and reproduces.

70. Source of a Pasadena parade aroma : ROSES

The first Rose Parade was staged in 1890 on New Year’s Day in Pasadena, California. The initial parades were organized by the Pasadena Valley Hunt Club, whose members wanted to highlight the mild winter weather in the area. The initial parades did not feature flowers, but these were added to underscore the favorable climate. It was the inclusion of the flowers that gave rise to the name “Tournament of Roses”. The first Rose Bowl football game was played in 1902.

71. “Little Beau __”: 1952 toon about a skunk : PEPE

Pepé Le Pew is a very likeable cartoon character from the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series. Pepé is a French skunk, first introduced way back in 1945. He is always thinking of “l’amour” and chases the lady skunks, or a black cat with a white stripe accidentally painted down her back.

75. Asgard group : AESIR

The gods and goddesses of Norse mythology generally belong to either the Aesir tribe or the Vanir tribe. Most of the Norse gods with which we are familiar belong to Aesir, including Odin, Thor, Frigg and Tyr. Examples of the Vanir gods are Freya and Njord. The Aesir live in Asgard, and the Vanir in Vanaheim. The Aesir and Vanir eventually united into one pantheon after the Aesir-Vanir War.

Asgard is one of the Nine Worlds of Norse religions. It is where the Norse gods live, and is also home to Valhalla, the enormous hall ruled over by the god Odin.

76. Some lighters : BICS

Société Bic is a French company, based in Clichy in France. The first product the company produced, more than fifty years ago, was the Bic Cristal ballpoint pen that is still produced today. Bic also makes other disposable products such as lighters and razors.

85. “Taxi” dispatcher : LOUIE

Danny DeVito’s big break as an actor came with the role of Louie De Palma on the sitcom “Taxi”. After parlaying his success on television into some major comic roles on the big screen, DeVito turned to producing. He co-founded the production company Jersey Films which made hit movies such as “Pulp Fiction” and “Garden State”. DeVito has been married to actress Rhea Perlman for well over 30 years.

88. Apple platform : IOS

iOS is what Apple now call their mobile operating system. Previously, it was known as iPhone OS.

89. Fireside treats : S’MORES

S’mores are treats peculiar to North America that are usually eaten around a campfire. A s’more consists of a roasted marshmallow and a layer of chocolate sandwiched between two graham crackers. The earliest written reference to the recipe is in a 1927 publication called “Tramping and Trailing with the Girl Scouts”. Girl Scouts always did corner the market on cookies and the like!

91. Fifth-century nomad : HUN

The Huns were a nomadic people who originated in Eastern Europe in the 4th century. Under the command of Attila the Hun they developed a unified empire that stretched from modern-day Germany across to the steppes of Central Asia. The whole of the Hunnic Empire collapsed within a year of Attila’s death in 453 AD.

96. *”Dead Poets Society” setting : BOARDING SCHOOL

1989’s “Dead Poets Society” was directed by Peter Weir and stars Robin Williams as an English teacher who uses poetry to inspire his students. Tom Schulman wrote the somewhat autobiographical script based on his own experiences at a day school in Nashville, Tennessee. This is one of my favorite Robin Williams movies …

108. Powerful : SINEWED

“Sinew” is another name for “tendon”. Tendons are bands of collagen that connect muscle to bone. Tendons are similar to ligaments and fasciae, which are also connective tissue made out of collagen, but ligaments join bone to bone, and fasciae connect muscle to muscle. We also use the term “sinew” to mean muscular power.

114. Arthur of “The Golden Girls” : BEA

Actress Bea Arthur’s most famous roles were on television, as the lead in the “All in the Family” spin-off “Maude” and as Dorothy Zbornak in “The Golden Girls”. Arthur also won a Tony for playing Vera Charles on stage in the original cast of “Mame” in 1966, two years after she played Yente the matchmaker in the original cast of “Fiddler on the Roof”.

115. Israeli heat? : UZI

The first Uzi submachine gun was designed in the late 1940s by Major Uziel “Uzi” Gal of the Israel Defense Forces, who gave his name to the gun.

116. Get decked out : TOG UP

The verb “tog up”, meaning to dress up, comes from the Latin “toga”, the garment worn in Ancient Rome. “Tog” can be also be used as an informal word for a coat or a cloak. Back in Ireland, togs are what we call swimming shorts.

122. Rival of ancient Carthage : UTICA

The ancient city of Utica was perhaps the first colony founded by the Phoenicians in North Africa. Located in modern-day Tunisia, Utica surrendered to Rome shortly before the Third Punic War after which it became the capital of the Roman province of Africa.

The Carthaginian Republic was centered on the city of Carthage, the ruins of which are located on the coast of modern-day Tunisia. The Latin name for the people of Carthage was “Afri”. When the Romans took over Carthage, they created a province they called “Africa”. That name extended over time to include the whole continent.

123. Pump, e.g. : SHOE

A pump is a woman’s shoe that doesn’t have a strap. Such shoes are probably called “pumps” because of the sound they make while walking in them.

124. Culture dish media : AGARS

Agar (also “agar-agar”) is a jelly extracted from seaweed that has many uses. Agar is found in Japanese desserts, and can also be used as a food thickener or even as a laxative. In the world of science, it is the most common medium used for growing bacteria in Petri dishes.

125. Compos mentis : SANE

“Compos mentis” is a Latin phrase that translates as “in command of one’s mind”. It is a term used in contemporary law.

126. Passé : DATED

“Passé” is a French word, meaning “past, faded”. We’ve imported the term into English, and use it in the same sense.

Down

1. __ curls : BICEP

The biceps muscle is made up of two bundles of muscle, both of which terminate at the same point near the elbow. The heads of the bundles terminate at different points on the scapula or shoulder blade. “Biceps” is Latin for “two-headed”.

3. Stiller’s partner : MEARA

Anne Meara married fellow comedic actor Jerry Stiller in 1954. The couple’s children are actors Ben and Amy Stiller. Meara co-starred with Carroll O’Connor and Martin Balsam in the eighties sitcom “Archie Bunker’s Place”, a spin-off from “All in the Family”.

5. “Tomb Raider” star Vikander : ALICIA

Alicia Vikander is an actress from Sweden. She gained recognition with American audiences when she played the humanoid robot in the fascinating 2015 film “Ex Machina”. In 2018, she played the title character in the film “Tomb Raider”. Vikander is married to Irish actor Michael Fassbender.

“Tomb Raider” is a 2018 reboot of the series of movies that starred Angelina Jolie as archaeologist and adventurer Lara Croft. Swedish actress Alicia Vikander takes over as Croft in the 2018 film.

7. DJIA part: Abbr. : AVG

Dow Jones & Company was founded as a publishing house in 1882 by three newspaper reporters, Charles Dow, Edward Jones and Charles Bergstresser. Today, the company’s most famous publication has to be “The Wall Street Journal”. In 1884, Charles Dow started reporting the average dollar value of the stock of eleven companies, an index which spawned a whole host of metrics that carry the Dow Jones name to this day, including the renowned Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA), also known as the “Dow 30”.

9. Third face of Eve? : SETH

According to the Bible, Seth was the third son of Adam and Eve, coming after Cain and Abel. Seth is the only other child of Adam and Eve who is mentioned by name. According to the Book of Genesis, Seth was born after Cain had slain his brother Abel.

11. Bulldogs fan : ELI

The Yale Bulldogs are the athletic teams of Yale University. The Yale school mascot is “Handsome Dan”, the Yale bulldog. The Bulldogs’ logo features a bulldog in front of a letter Y.

17. Nice with? : AVEC

The French city of Nice is on the Mediterranean coast in the southeast of the country. Although Nice is only the fifth most populous city in France, it is home to the busiest airport outside of Paris. That’s because of all the tourists flocking to the French Riviera.

25. NBA exec Danny : AINGE

Danny Ainge is a retired professional basketball and baseball player. Ainge was an outstanding athlete from an early age, and is the only person to be named a high-school All American in the three sports of football, basketball and baseball.

33. “Wicked Game” singer Chris : ISAAK

Chris Isaak is not only a rock musician, but also has had a lot of acting parts. Isaak had small roles in movies like “Married to the Mob” and “The Silence of the Lambs”, but I remember him as astronaut Ed White in the fabulous HBO miniseries “From the Earth to the Moon”.

36. Disaster site procedures : TRIAGES

Triage is the process of prioritizing patients for treatment, especially on a battlefield. The term “triage” is French and means “a sorting”.

42. Blue hue : CYAN

“Cyan” is short for “cyan blue”. The term comes from the Greek word “kyanos” meaning “dark blue, the color of lapis lazuli”.

44. “Tiny Alice” dramatist : ALBEE

“Tiny Alice” is a play by Edward Albee that premiered on Broadway in 1964. The play deals with the corruption that can arise with the mixing of religion and money.

46. “High Hopes” lyricist : CAHN

Sammy Cahn wrote the lyrics for “High Hopes” for the 1959 film “A Hole in the Head”, and the song won an Oscar that year. Frank Sinatra was the star of the movie, and he recorded the most famous version of the song.

Just what makes that little old ant
Think he’ll move that rubber tree plant
Anyone knows an ant, can’t
Move a rubber tree plant

But he’s got high hopes
He’s got high hopes
He’s got high apple pie
In the sky hopes

47. Plains native : OTOE

The Otoe (also “Oto”) Native American tribe originated in the Great Lakes region as part of the Winnebago or Siouan tribes. The group that would become the Otoe broke away from the Winnebago and migrated southwestward, ending up in the Great Plains. In the plains the Otoe adopted a semi-nomadic lifestyle dependent on the horse, with the American bison becoming central to their diet.

48. Persian call : MEOW!

The Persian is that long-haired cat with a squashed muzzle. The breed takes its name from its place of origin, namely Persia (Iran).

54. Lion king : SIMBA

In the 1994 movie “The Lion King”, the protagonist is Simba, the lion cub born to Mufasa and Sarabi. The main antagonist is Scar, Simba’s uncle and Mufasa’s brother. Simba is voiced by Matthew Broderick, and Scar is voiced by Jeremy Irons.

68. __ salts : EPSOM

The Surrey town of Epsom in England is most famous for its racecourse (Epsom Downs), at which is run the Epsom Derby every year, one of the three races that make up the English Triple Crown. We also come across “Epsom salts” from time to time. Epsom salt is magnesium sulfate, originally prepared by boiling down mineral waters. Epsom was indeed a spa town at one time. The town is also home to Epsom College, an English “public school” (which actually means “private, and expensive”). One of Epsom’s “old boys” was the Hollywood actor Stewart Granger.

69. Counterculture icon Hoffman : ABBIE

Abbie Hoffman was the founder of the “Yippies”, an activist group that had violent clashes with the police during the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago. Hoffman, along with six other defendants, were eventually brought up on charges related to the protests and became known collectively as the “Chicago Seven”.

70. __ Beach: L.A. suburb : REDONDO

Redondo Beach is one of the three so-called Beach Cities in L.A. County, California (along with Manhattan Beach and Hermosa Beach). Among Redondo Beach’s famous residents were the Smothers Brothers, who grew up there and graduated from the local high school.

71. Gumshoes, for short : PIS

“Gumshoe” is a slang term for a private detective or private investigator (P.I.). Apparently the term dates back to the early 1900s, and refers to the rubber-soled shoes popular with private detectives at that time.

72. Lion king : ASLAN

In the C. S. Lewis series of books known as “The Chronicles of Narnia”, Aslan is the name of the lion character (as in the title “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe”). “Aslan” is actually the Turkish word for lion. Anyone who has read the books will recognize the the remarkable similarity between the story of Aslan and the story of Christ, including a sacrifice and resurrection.

73. Actress Massey : ILONA

Ilona Massey was a Hollywood actress, a native of Budapest in Hungary. Given her cultural background and the period at which she hit the big screen, Massey was marketed by the studios as “the new Dietrich”.

82. Fed. workplace watchdog : OSHA

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was created in 1970 during the Nixon administration. OSHA regulates workplaces in the private sector and regulates just one government agency, namely the US Postal Service.

83. Red __: spicy candies : HOTS

Red Hots are cinnamon-flavored candy pieces. I recently found out that Red Hots are sometimes used in apple sauce …

84. Like neon : NOBLE

The noble gases (also “rare gases”) are those elements over on the extreme right of the Periodic Table. Because of their “full” complement of electrons, noble gases are very unreactive. The six noble gases that occur naturally are helium, neon, argon, krypton, xenon and radon.

86. Bit of roller derby protection : ELBOW PAD

The sport of roller derby has an international footprint, with almost half the world’s teams being located outside of the US. Most of the teams playing the sport are all-female.

93. Stalks in a pie : RHUBARB

We can eat the leaf stalks of the rhubarb plant, but not the leaves themselves. The leaves contain oxalic acid and are highly toxic.

97. Corrida cry : OLE!

Spanish bullfighting is known locally as “corrida de toros”, literally “race of bulls”.

102. Ad preceder? : DEUCE

In tennis, if the score reaches “deuce” (i.e. when both players have scored three points), then the first player to win two points in a row wins the game. The player who wins the point immediately after deuce is said to have the “advantage”. If the player with the advantage wins the next point then that’s two in a row and that player wins the game. If the person with the advantage loses the next point, then advantage is lost and the players return to deuce and try again. If the one of the players is calling out the score then if he/she has the advantage then that player announces “ad in” or more formally “advantage in”. If the score announcer’s opponent has the advantage, then the announcement is “ad out” or “advantage out”. Follow all of that …?

105. Burj Khalifa’s city : DUBAI

Burj Khalifa is a spectacular skyscraper in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. It is the tallest man-made structure in the world, and has been so since the completion of its exterior in 2009. The space in the building came onto the market at a really bad time, during the global financial crisis. The building was part of a US$20 billion development of downtown Dubai that was backed by the city government which had to go looking for a bailout from the neighboring city of Abu Dhabi. The tower was given the name Burj Khalifa at the last minute, apparently as a nod to the UAE president Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan who helped to broker the bailout.

106. Endangered layer : OZONE

Ozone gets its name from the Greek word “ozein” meaning “to smell”. It was given this name as ozone’s formation during lightning storms was detected by the gas’s distinctive smell. Famously, there is a relatively high concentration of the gas in the “ozone layer” in the Earth’s stratosphere. This ozone layer provides a vital function for animal life on the planet as it absorbs most of the sun’s UV radiation. A molecule of ozone is made up of three oxygen atoms, whereas a “normal” oxygen has just two atoms

107. Put the kibosh on : NIXED

A kibosh is something that constrains or checks. “Kibosh” looks like a Yiddish word but it isn’t, and is more likely English slang from the early 1800s.

109. Scintilla : IOTA

A scintilla is a small amount. The term can also be used to describe a spark or a flash (as in “to scintillate”). The term came into English from Latin, in which language it means “spark, particle of fire, atom”.

110. Slipped __ : DISC

Our intervertebral discs are composed mainly of cartilage. They perform the crucial functions of separating the vertebrae while allowing slight movement, and also absorbing shock. A “slipped disc” isn’t really a disc that has “slipped”, but rather a disc that “bulges”. If that bulge causes pressure on the sciatic nerve then the painful condition known as sciatica can result.

112. Cybernuisance : SPAM

The term “spam”, used for unwanted email, is taken from a “Monty Python” sketch. In the sketch (which I’ve seen) the dialog is taken over by the word Spam, a play on the glut of canned meat in the markets of Britain after WWII. So “spam” is used for the glut of emails that takes over online communication. I can just imagine nerdy Internet types (like me) adopting something from a “Monty Python” sketch to describe an online phenomenon …

113. Genesis creator : SEGA

Genesis is a video game console sold in the US by the Japanese company Sega. Genesis is sold as Mega Drive in the rest of the world, as Sega couldn’t get the rights to the Mega Drive name in the US.

118. Apt sports org. for this puzzle : NHL

National Hockey League (NHL)

120. House of Commons vote : NAY

The UK Parliament is divided into two houses, with the upper house known as the House of Lords and the lower house as the House of Commons. The members of the House of Commons are elected, but most new members of the House of Lords are appointed. Historically, a large proportion of the membership of the upper house were hereditary peers, but recent legislative changes are reducing the numbers who can sit in the House of Lords by virtue of birthright.

121. Designer monogram : YSL

Yves Saint Laurent (YSL) was an Algerian-born French fashion designer. Saint Laurent started off working as an assistant to Christian Dior at the age of 17. Dior died just four years later, and as a very young man Saint-Laurent was named head of the House of Dior. However, in 1950 Saint Laurent was conscripted into the French Army and ended up in a military hospital after suffering a mental breakdown from the hazing inflicted on him by his fellow soldiers. His treatment included electroshock therapy and administration of sedatives and psychoactive drugs. He was released from hospital, managed to pull his life back together and started his own fashion house. A remarkable story …

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Kick off the flight : BUMP
5. “Nixon in China” composer John : ADAMS
10. Underground invader : WEED
14. Fragrant wood : CEDAR
19. Goatee-stroking words : I SEE
20. Bank built for a rainy day : LEVEE
21. Pal of Grover : ELMO
22. It’s pressed for oil : OLIVE
23. *Electric vehicle need : CHARGING STATION
26. Stirred : MOVED
27. Puppet extension? : -EER
28. Suffix with gymnast : -ICS
29. Leveling wedge : SHIM
30. Hot belt, with “the” : TROPICS
32. “God Bless America” landscape word : PRAIRIES
35. Punishment with a grounding : NO TV
38. Many a Snapchat user : TEEN
39. *Having a blowout sale : SLASHING PRICES
43. Long-nosed fish : GAR
46. 1977 medical thriller : COMA
49. From head __ : TO TOE
50. More than cool : ICY
51. A deal may be made under it, with “the” : TABLE
53. Military order : AT EASE
56. Neatnik’s possible condition, briefly : OCD
57. Crunched figures : DATA
58. Minute critter : AMEBA
59. *Fish story theme : HOOKING THE BIG ONE
63. Blackmailed : BLED
64. Green : NEW
65. Herd voices : MOOS
66. Road crew worker : PAVER
67. Became clear : JELLED
69. Border : ABUT
70. Source of a Pasadena parade aroma : ROSES
71. “Little Beau __”: 1952 toon about a skunk : PEPE
72. Auto safety device : AIRBAG
75. Asgard group : AESIR
76. Some lighters : BICS
77. Canceled, as an event : OFF
80. Mess maker : SLOB
81. *Like a man resisting the urge to argue : HOLDING HIS TONGUE
85. “Taxi” dispatcher : LOUIE
87. ATM feature : SLOT
88. Apple platform : IOS
89. Fireside treats : S’MORES
90. Christmas tree topper : ANGEL
91. Fifth-century nomad : HUN
92. Log : ENTER
94. Waist container? : BELT
95. Casual “Pass” : NAH
96. *”Dead Poets Society” setting : BOARDING SCHOOL
101. Target of adoration : IDOL
103. Ages and ages : EONS
104. Aroused : TURNED ON
108. Powerful : SINEWED
111. Swear : CUSS
114. Arthur of “The Golden Girls” : BEA
115. Israeli heat? : UZI
116. Get decked out : TOG UP
117. Temporarily disqualified due to an infraction that begins any of seven answers to starred clues : IN THE PENALTY BOX
122. Rival of ancient Carthage : UTICA
123. Pump, e.g. : SHOE
124. Culture dish media : AGARS
125. Compos mentis : SANE
126. Passé : DATED
127. Piece of dirt : CLOD
128. “I’ll think about it” : MAYBE
129. Wasn’t straight : LIED

Down

1. __ curls : BICEP
2. Arena worker : USHER
3. Stiller’s partner : MEARA
4. Pricing word : PER
5. “Tomb Raider” star Vikander : ALICIA
6. Most populous : DENSEST
7. DJIA part: Abbr. : AVG
8. __ hall : MESS
9. Third face of Eve? : SETH
10. Tool needing wringing : WET MOP
11. Bulldogs fan : ELI
12. Rock subculture : EMO
13. Stern warning : DON’T!
14. “How goes it, José?” : COMO ESTA?
15. Split to be tied? : ELOPE
16. *Pressurized undersea compartment : DIVING BELL
17. Nice with? : AVEC
18. Cherry and crimson : REDS
24. Birth announcement word : GIRL
25. NBA exec Danny : AINGE
31. Bus path: Abbr. : RTE
33. “Wicked Game” singer Chris : ISAAK
34. Tries to score : SHOOTS
36. Disaster site procedures : TRIAGES
37. Spoils recipient : VICTOR
40. Craving : ITCH
41. Unreturnable, as a bottle : NO-DEPOSIT
42. Blue hue : CYAN
44. “Tiny Alice” dramatist : ALBEE
45. Check, in a way : RE-ADD
46. “High Hopes” lyricist : CAHN
47. Plains native : OTOE
48. Persian call : MEOW!
52. Mosey : AMBLE
54. Lion king : SIMBA
55. Once, sometimes : ENOUGH
57. Going every which way : DIVERGING
60. Came down with : GOT
61. Sink : BASIN
62. Throws out : EJECTS
68. __ salts : EPSOM
69. Counterculture icon Hoffman : ABBIE
70. __ Beach: L.A. suburb : REDONDO
71. Gumshoes, for short : PIS
72. Lion king : ASLAN
73. Actress Massey : ILONA
74. *Camping out, say : ROUGHING IT
75. Enticement : ALLURE
76. Halve : BISECT
77. Fiendish sort : OGRE
78. Tank filler : FUEL
79. Ending for gab or talk : -FEST
82. Fed. workplace watchdog : OSHA
83. Red __: spicy candies : HOTS
84. Like neon : NOBLE
86. Bit of roller derby protection : ELBOW PAD
92. Come after : ENSUE
93. Stalks in a pie : RHUBARB
97. Corrida cry : OLE!
98. Slowly crept : INCHED
99. Promise of dire consequences : OR ELSE
100. Go __ great length : ON AT
102. Ad preceder? : DEUCE
105. Burj Khalifa’s city : DUBAI
106. Endangered layer : OZONE
107. Put the kibosh on : NIXED
108. Ear decoration : STUD
109. Scintilla : IOTA
110. Slipped __ : DISC
112. Cybernuisance : SPAM
113. Genesis creator : SEGA
118. Apt sports org. for this puzzle : NHL
119. In addition : TOO
120. House of Commons vote : NAY
121. Designer monogram : YSL

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