LA Times Crossword 9 Dec 18, Sunday

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Constructed by: Paul Coulter
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Culinary School

Themed answers are two-word names for items commonly used in the CULINARY world. But, those names have been reinterpreted in the clues:

  • 23A. Pie company exec? : PASTRY WHEEL
  • 25A. Bad brunch review? : OMELET PAN
  • 37A. Neighborhood with meat purveyors? : BUTCHER BLOCK
  • 55A. ATM code you rotate regularly? : ROLLING PIN
  • 84A. Thief at a fertility clinic? : EGG POACHER
  • 98A. Nasty group of directors? : CUTTING BOARD
  • 116A. Stadium for a boxing match? : PUNCH BOWL
  • 118A. Journalists covering a spicy story? : GARLIC PRESS

Bill’s time: 12m 54s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. 8 for O, e.g. : AT NO

The atomic number (at. no.) of an element is also called the proton number, and is the number of protons found in the nucleus of each atom of the element.

The atomic number (at. no.) of oxygen (O) is 8, and of nitrogen (N) is 7.

5. Quibbles : CARPS

The word “carp” used to mean simply “talk” back in the 13th century, with its roots in the Old Norwegian “karpa” meaning “to brag”. A century later, the Latin word “carpere” meaning “to slander” influenced the use of “to carp” so that it came to mean “to find fault with”.

10. “M*A*S*H” actor : ALDA

Alan Alda has had a great television career, especially of course as a lead actor in “M*A*S*H”. Alda won his first Emmy in 1972, for playing surgeon Hawkeye Pierce on “M*A*S*H”. He also won an Emmy in 2006 for his portrayal of Presidential candidate Senator Arnold Vinick in “The West Wing”. When it comes to the big screen, my favorite of Alda’s movies is the 1978 romantic comedy “Same Time, Next Year” in which he starred opposite Ellen Burstyn.

20. Autumn color : OCHRE

Ocher is a light, yellowy-brown color, although variations of the pigment are possible such as red ocher and purple ocher. “Ocher” is usually spelled “ochre” on the other side of the pond.

21. Tea party host : MARCH HARE

The March Hare is a character in Lewis Carroll’s “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland”. It was the March Hare who hosted the tea party near the start of the story, in which we are introduced to another famous character, the Mad Hatter.

26. Find new quarters for : REHOUSE

We use the term “quarters” for a place of abode, especially housing for military personnel. Back in the late 16th century, quarters were a portion (quarter) of a town reserved for a military force.

30. Michelangelo masterpiece : PIETA

The Pietà is a representation of the Virgin Mary holding in her arms the dead body of her son Jesus. The most famous Pietà is undoubtedly the sculpted rendition by Michelangelo that is located in St. Peter’s Basilica in Vatican City. That particular sculpture is thought to be the only work that Michelangelo signed. In some depictions of the Pietà, Mary and her son are surrounded by other figures from the New Testament. Such depictions are known as Lamentations.

32. Cooking fat : SUET

Fat, when extracted from the carcass of an animal, is called suet. Untreated suet decomposes at room temperature quite easily so it has to be rendered or purified to make it stable. Rendered fat from pigs is what we call lard. Rendered beef or mutton fat is known as tallow.

34. Guadalajara girls : NINAS

Guadalajara is a populous city in the Mexican state of Jalisco. The Mexican city is named after the city of the same name in the center of Spain.

37. Neighborhood with meat purveyors? : BUTCHER BLOCK

Our words “provide” and “purvey” have similar meanings, and both derive from the Latin verb “providere” meaning “to supply”.

50. Yours, in Tours : A TOI

Tours is the largest city in the Centre region of France. Sitting on the Loire river, it is said that the people of Tours speak the “purest” form of French in the whole country. The French spoken by a local is also said to be free of any accent.

51. Doc bloc : AMA

American Medical Association (AMA)

52. Keisters : SEATS

Back in the early 1900s a “keister” was a safe or a strongbox. It has been suggested that this term was then used as slang by pickpockets for the rear trouser pocket in which one might keep a wallet. From this usage, keister appeared as a slang term for the buttocks in the early 1930s.

54. “Momo” author Michael : ENDE

Michael Ende was a children’s author from Germany. His most famous novel is the fantasy work titled “The Neverending Story”, first published in 1979.

55. ATM code you rotate regularly? : ROLLING PIN

One enters a Personal Identification Number (PIN) when using an Automated Teller Machine (ATM). Given that the N in PIN stands for “number”, then “PIN number” is a redundant phrase. And, given that the M in ATM stands for “machine”, then “ATM machine” is a redundant phrase as well. Grr …!

59. FICA benefit : SSI

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is federal program that provides financial relief to persons with low incomes who are 65 or older, or who are blind or disabled. The SSI program is administered by the Social Security Administration (SSA) even though the the Social Security trust fund is not used for SSI payments. SSI payments come out of general tax revenue.

The Federal Insurance Contributions Act tax (FICA) was introduced in the 1930s as part of President Roosevelt’s New Deal. FICA payments are made by both employees and employers in order to fund Social Security and Medicare.

60. Unit in Ohm’s Law : AMPERE

The unit of electric current is the ampere, which is abbreviated correctly to “A” rather than “amp”. It is named after French physicist André-Marie Ampère, one of the main scientists responsible for the discovery of electromagnetism.

The unit of electrical resistance is the ohm (with the symbol omega) named after German physicist Georg Simon Ohm. Ohm was the guy who established experimentally that the amount of current flowing through a circuit is directly proportional to the voltage applied, (V=IR) a relationship that every school kid knows as Ohm’s Law.

62. Costa del __ : SOL

Spain’s Costa del Sol (“Coast of the Sun”) is in Andalusia in the South of Spain. It lies sandwiched between two other “costas”, the Costa de la Luz and the Costa Tropical. The city of Malaga is on the Costa del Sol, as well as the famous European tourist destinations of Torremolinos and Marbella. The Costa del Sol was made up of sleepy little fishing villages until the 1980s when the European sunseekers descended on the region. I wouldn’t recommend it for a holiday quite frankly …

69. Not yet on the sched. : TBA

Something not yet on the schedule (“sked” or “sched.”) is to be advised/announced (TBA).

78. Adaptable truck, for short : UTE

A utility vehicle is often called a “ute” for short. Nowadays one mainly hears about sport-utes and crossover-utes.

82. Barbershop parts : TENORS

Barbershop music is played in the a cappella style, meaning that it is unaccompanied vocal music. Barbershop music originated in the African-American communities in the South, as gospel quartets often gathered in neighborhood barber shops to sing together.

83. Batman and the Boy Wonder, e.g. : DUO

Batman is sometimes referred to as the Caped Crusader, Robin as the Boy Wonder, and the pair as the Dynamic Duo.

87. AA and AAA, e.g. : ORGS

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) was founded in 1935, by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith in Akron, Ohio. As the organization grew, the guiding principles established by the founders were formatted into a 12-step program that was in place by the forties.

The American Automobile Association (AAA) is a not-for-profit organization focused on lobbying, provision of automobile servicing, and selling of automobile insurance. The AAA was founded in 1902 in Chicago and published the first of its celebrated hotel guides back in 1917.

90. “Do Ya” rock gp. : ELO

The Electric Light Orchestra (ELO) is a symphonic rock group from the north of England.

91. “I see” : AHSO

The slang term “ahso” is used in American English to mean “I see”. The term derives from the Japanese expression “Ah so desu ka” meaning “Oh, that’s how it is”.

95. Leslie of “Gigi” : CARON

The beautiful and talented French actress and dancer Leslie Caron is best known for her appearances in the classic Hollywood musical films “An American in Paris”, “Lili” and “Gigi”. Although I love the movie “Gigi”, my favorite of her performances is in the comedy war drama “Father Goose” in which she played opposite Cary Grant. Caron has danced with the best, including Gene Kelly, Fred Astaire, Mikhail Baryshnikov and Rudolf Nureyev.

In the lovely musical film “Gigi”, released in 1958, the title song is sung by Louis Jourdan who plays Gaston. My favorite number though, has to be “Thank Heaven for Little Girls” sung by Maurice Chevalier. Many say that “Gigi” is the last in the long line of great MGM musicals. It won a record 9 Academy Awards, a record that only lasted one year. Twelve months later “Ben Hur” won 11 Oscars. In the 1958 film, Gigi was played by the lovely Leslie Caron. A few years earlier, “Gigi” was a successful stage play on Broadway. Chosen for the title role on stage was the then-unknown Audrey Hepburn.

101. Like Dennis the Menace : PESKY

“Dennis the Menace” is a comic strip that first appeared in 1951, and was originally drawn by Hank Ketcham. The strip made the jump over the years from the newspaper to television and the silver screen. Dennis’s full name is Dennis Mitchell, and his parents are Henry and Alice (Johnson) Mitchell. Dennis’s nemesis is his neighbor, Mister George Everett Wilson. Hank Ketcham drew his inspiration for the story from his real life. When he introduced the strip he had a 4-year-old son called Dennis, and a wife named Alice.

103. Part of Q.E.D. : ERAT

The initialism “QED” is used at the end of a mathematical proof or a philosophical argument. QED stands for the Latin “quod erat demonstrandum” meaning “that which was to be demonstrated”.

105. Leg bone : TIBIA

The tibia is the shin bone, and is the larger of the two bones right below the knee. It is the strongest weight-bearing bone in the human body. “Tibia” is the Roman name for a Greek flute and it is thought that the shin bone was given the same name because flutes were often fashioned out of the shin bones of animals.

121. Wood preservatives : CREOSOTES

“Creosote” is the name given to chemicals obtained by the distillation of tar. Creosote has two main uses, as an antiseptic and as a wood preservative. The term “creosote” comes from the Greek for “flesh preserver”.

122. Farm refrain : E-I-E-I-O

There was an American version of the English children’s song “Old MacDonald Had a Farm” (E-I-E-I-O), that was around in the days of WWI. The first line of the US version goes “Old MacDougal had a farm, in Ohio-i-o”.

123. Spock’s father : SAREK

In the “Star Trek” universe, Sarek is the Vulcan father of Spock. Sarek is the son of the first Vulcan ambassador to Earth. Sarak married a earthwoman, Amanda Grayson, with whom he had the child Spock. Most famously, Sarek was portrayed on both small and large screen by actor Mark Lenard.

124. Firm employees: Abbr. : ATTS

Attorney (att.)

A business is sometimes called a “firm”. “Firm” comes into English from Latin via the Italian “firma” meaning signature. The concept is that business transactions are confirmed, made firm, by applying a signature.

125. Bone on a menu : OSSO

“Osso” is the Italian word for bone, as in the name of the dish “osso buco” (bone with a hole), which features braised veal shanks.

126. Some NCOs : SSGTS

A staff sergeant (SSgt.) is a non-commissioned officer (NCO).

Down

1. Cleopatra killer : ASP

The asp is a venomous snake found in the Nile region of Africa. It is so venomous that the asp was used in ancient Egypt and Greece as a means of execution. Cleopatra observed such executions noting that the venom brought on sleepiness without any painful spasms. When the great queen opted to commit suicide, the asp was therefore her chosen method.

2. Choreographer Twyla : THARP

I love Twyla Tharp’s choreography, and her “patented moves”. Tharp was born in Portland, Indiana in 1941. She was named for Twila Thornburg, the “Pig Princess” of the 89th Annual Muncie Fair in Indiana. That’s one to tell to the grandkids …

3. Japanese-American : NISEI

There are some very specific terms used to describe the children born to Japanese immigrants in their new country. The immigrants themselves are known as “Issei”. “Nisei” are second generation Japanese, “Sansei” the third generation (grandchildren of the immigrant), and “Yonsei” are fourth generation.

4. Without delay, as payment : ON THE NAIL

The phrase “on the nail” dates back as far as the late 1500s. When one pays on the nail, one makes immediate payment. There was an Anglo-Norman phrase, “payer sur le ungle” (to pay on the nail), which had the same usage. The word “ungle” refers to a nail at the end of finger, on a hand. So, payment “on the nail” is really payment “made immediately, by hand”.

5. Intimidates : COWS

The verb “to cow” means to intimidate, to scare. The exact etymology of the term seems unclear.

6. Advil target : ACHE

Advil is Wyeth’s brand of ibuprofen, an anti-inflammatory drug.

7. MLB scoreboard abbr. : RHE

On baseball scoreboards we see the letters RHE, standing for Runs, Hits and Errors.

9. Traitors : SELLOUTS

Treason is a serious crime committed against the nation (or the sovereign). One who commits “treason” is called a “traitor”. In the past, the term treason also applied to lesser crimes so there was a differentiation between high treason against the king, and “petit treason” against a more common citizen.

10. Crazily : AMOK

The phrase “to run amok” (sometimes “to run amuck”) has been around since the 1670s and is derived from the Malay word for “attacking furiously”, “amuk”. The word “amok” was also used as a noun to describe Malay natives who were “frenzied”. Given Malaya’s troubled history, the natives probably had good reason for that frenzy …

13. An MRI may reveal a torn one : ACL

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of four major ligaments that support the knee.

14. “Fiddler on the Roof” setting : SHTETL

The Yiddish word for “town” is “shtot”, and so “shtetl” is the diminutive form meaning “small town”. The fictional shtetl featured in the musical in “Fiddler on the Roof” is called Anatevka, which is also the title of my favorite song from the show.

The enduring musical “Fiddler on the Roof” is based on a collection of stories by Sholem Aleichem about Tevye, a milkman living in Tsarist Russia. The musical version of the tales first opened on Broadway in 1964. “Fiddler on the Roof” had such a long run that it became the first musical to reach 3,000 performances.

16. Asian sea : ARAL

The Aral Sea is a great example of how man can have a devastating effect on his environment. In the early sixties the Aral Sea covered 68,000 square miles of Central Asia. Soviet irrigation projects drained the lake to such an extent that today the total area is less than 7,000 square miles, with 90% of the lake now completely dry. Sad …

17. Mil. bigwigs : GENS

A bigwig is someone important. The use of the term “bigwig” harks back to the days when men of authority and rank wore … big wigs.

24. Chinese currency : YUAN

The Korean Won, the Chinese Yuan, and the Japanese Yen (all of which are Asian currencies) take their names from the Chinese written character that represents “round shape”.

28. __-rock : ALT

I really don’t know what alt-rock is, and I can’t seem to work it out. I’m just an old fuddy-duddy …

33. Modern address : URL

An Internet address (like NYTCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com) is more correctly called a Uniform Resource Locators (URL).

35. Commonly used saws : ADAGES

A saw is an old adage, a saying.

36. Gullible sort : SIMP

“Simp” is slang for a simple or foolish person. Not nice …

39. “You lose a lot of time, __ people”: Marian Anderson : HATING

Marian Anderson was a contralto from Philadelphia who spent her singing career performing in concerts and recitals rather that taking on operatic roles, despite many requests from respected opera companies. Anderson eschewed the invitations on the grounds that she had not been trained to act. As an African-American, Anderson was at the forefront in the struggle for artists of color to overcome racial prejudice. In 1939, she was refused permission to sing in Washington’s Constitution Hall that is owned by the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR). This decision resulted in First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt resigning from the DAR. Mrs. Roosevelt and her husband then backed an open-air concert on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial that same year, which was a resounding success.

40. Dog tag datum : OWNER

The identification tags worn by soldiers are often called “dog tags”, simply because they do resemble tags worn by dogs. US military personnel are required to wear dog tags when in the field. Each soldier wears either two tags or a special tag that breaks easily into two identical pieces. The idea is that if a soldier is killed then one half can be removed for notification and the remaining half stays with the body. Each tag contains basics such as name and ID number, medical information like blood type, and possibly a religious preference.

41. Close-knit group : CADRE

A cadre is most commonly a group of experienced personnel at the core of a larger organization that the small group trains or heavily influences. “Cadre” is a French word meaning “frame”. We use it in the sense that a cadre is a group that provides a “framework” for the larger organization.

43. Drummer Ulrich : LARS

Lars Ulrich is a drummer from Denmark, and one of the founding members of the American heavy metal band called Metallica. Lars is the son of former professional tennis player Torben Ulrich, the oldest Davis Cup player in history.

47. Place for an honoree : DAIS

A dais is a raised platform for a speaker. The term “dais” comes from the Latin “discus” meaning a “disk-shaped object”. I guess that the original daises had such a shape.

54. Blunt blade : EPEE

The sword known as an épée has a three-sided blade. The épée is similar to a foil and sabre, although the foil and saber have rectangular cross-sections.

57. Wikipedia policy : NO ADS

Wikipedia is an online encyclopedia, and the most-used reference site on the Internet. It was launched by Jimmy Wales and Larry Sanger in 2001. I, for one, am very grateful …

60. Thomas associate : ALITO

Associate Justice Samuel Alito was nominated to the US Supreme Court by President George W. Bush. Alito is the second Italian-American to serve on the Supreme Court (Antonin Scalia was the first). Alito studied law at Yale and while in his final year he left the country for the first time in his life, heading to Italy to work on his thesis about the Italian legal system.

Clarence Thomas is the second African American to serve on the US Supreme Court. Thomas replaced Thurgood Marshall who was the first American with African heritage to serve. Thomas is generally regarded as the most conservative member of the court. He doesn’t have a lot say, verbally anyway. Thomas made a joking remark in January 2013 during oral argument, the first time he had spoken at all during oral argument for almost seven years.

61. Euripides tragedy : MEDEA

“Medea” is a tragedy penned by Ancient Greek playwright Euripides. Dealing with the myth of Jason and Medea, it was not received well at its debut in 431 BC. It was premiered at that year’s Dionysia festival in Athens, competing against plays by Euphorion and Sophocles. Euphorion’s play won the competition and Euripides’ “Medea” came in last.

Euripides was a celebrated playwright of Ancient Greece and someone renowned for his tragedies. Euripides was one of the three great writers of tragedy of classical Athens, alongside Aeschylus and Sophocles.

65. “Criminal Minds” agcy. : FBI

“Criminal Minds” is a police drama that has aired on CBS since 2005. The stories revolve around the FBI’s Behavioral Analysis Unit in Quantico, Virginia.

71. Two-time Tony winner Patti : LUPONE

The singer Patti LuPone won Tonys for playing Eva Peron in “Evita ” and Rose in “Gypsy”.

72. Zeno, notably : STOIC

Zeno of Citium was a Greek philosopher famous for teaching at the Stoa Poikile, the “Painted Porch”, located on the north side of the Ancient Agora of Athens. Because of the location of his classes, his philosophy became known as stoicism (from “stoa”, the word for “porch”). And yes, we get our adjective “stoic” from the same root.

73. Concealed : PERDU

Something described as “perdu” is hidden, concealed. “Perdu” is the French word for “lost”.

76. Natural fertilizer : GUANO

Guano is the droppings of seabirds, bats and seals. It is prized as fertilizer as it doesn’t really smell, and contains high levels of phosphorus and nitrogen. The word “guano” means “seabird droppings” in the Quechua language spoken in the Andes region of South America.

77. Hungarian wine region : EGER

Eger is a city in the northeast of Hungary that is noted for its thermal baths and for its wine production. Back in Ireland, I would quite often drink “Bull’s Blood”, which is Hungary’s most famous red wine, and which comes from the Eger wine region.

80. “__ we forget” : LEST

“Lest we forget” is an oft-quoted phrase, one that comes from a poem by Rudyard Kipling called “Recessional”. Kipling wrote the piece on the occasion of the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria in 1897 and used it to express sadness at the waning of the British Empire. The phrase “lest we forget” is used in this context, a warning that the empire will decline. Ever since WWI we’ve been using the words on memorials as a plea not forget the sacrifices made by others in the past.

81. God with a quiver : EROS

As always seems to be the case with Greek gods, Eros and Aphrodite have overlapping spheres of influence. Aphrodite was the goddess of love between a man and a woman, and Eros was the god who stirred the passions of the male. The Roman equivalent of Aphrodite was Venus, and the equivalent of Eros was Cupid.

A quiver is a container used for carrying arrows.

85. Hardly haute cuisine : GLOP

Glop is food that’s deemed unappetizing. “Glop” is imitative of the sound of inferior food hitting the plate.

“Haute cuisine”, literally “high cooking” in French, is the name given to skillfully and elegantly prepared food, especially if it is in the French style.

86. Large South American rodents : CAPYBARAS

The capybara is the largest rodent in the world, a native of South America. This huge animal is related to the tiny little guinea pig, a remarkable relationship given that a fully grown adult capybara can be over four feet long, and weigh up to 140 pounds.

88. Easy paces : DOGTROTS

The term “dogtrot” is used to describe an easy gait that is still quite fast. Such a gait might remind one of a dog comfortably trotting along, hence “dogtrot”.

89. Misers : SCROOGES

The classic 1843 novella “A Christmas Carol” by Charles Dickens has left us with a few famous phrases and words. Firstly, it led to popular use of the phrase “Merry Christmas”, and secondly it gave us the word “scrooge” to describe a miserly person. And thirdly, everyone knows that Ebenezer Scrooge uttered the words “Bah! Humbug!”.

93. Saddle-holding bands : GIRTHS

A girth or cinch is a piece of horse tack that is used to keep a saddle in place. The girth passes under the barrel of the horse, around the rib cage.

94. Tiny messenger : RNA

Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. That sequence is read in DNA by messenger RNA, and amino acids are delivered for protein manufacture in the correct sequence by what is called transfer RNA. The amino acids are then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA.

96. Keats, in a Shelley title : ADONAIS

The English poet Percy Bysshe Shelley wrote the pastoral elegy “Adonaïs” for his contemporary John Keats just after Keats died in 1821. Shelley was a great admirer of Keats, although Keats didn’t have much good to say about Shelley apparently.

99. AT&T and Verizon : TELCOS

A telco is a telecommunications company.

100. Dept. of Justice bigwigs : AGS

Attorneys General (AGs) head up the Department of Justice (DOJ). When the office of the Attorney General was created in 1789 it was a part-time job, with no departmental support. The Department of Justice came into being in 1870.

102. Opp. of legato, in music : STAC

Staccato is a musical direction signifying that notes should be played in a disconnected form. The opposite of staccato would be legato, indicating long and continuous notes played very smoothly.

108. Humane org. : SPCA

Unlike most developed countries, the US has no umbrella organization with the goal of preventing cruelty to animals. Instead there are independent organizations set up all over the nation using the name SPCA. Having said that, there is an organization called the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) that was originally intended to operate across the country, but really it now focuses its efforts in New York City.

115. “Vaya con __” : DIOS

“Vaya con Dios” is Spanish for “Go with God”.

117. Bit of heckling : BOO

Originally, the verb “to heckle” meant to question severely, and for many years was associated with the public questioning of parliamentary candidates in Scotland. In more recent times, the meaning has evolved into questioning that is less polite and that is directed at stand-up comics.

119. “Andy Capp” cartoonist Smythe : REG

“Andy Capp” is a comic strip from Britain that is syndicated internationally. The strip was created by Reg Smythe in 1957 and is still going strong, despite the fact that Smythe passed away in 1998. Andy Capp and his wife Florrie (also “Flo”) are working class characters who live in the northeast of England. Andy is unemployed and Flo works as a charwoman. “Andy Capp” was my favorite comic strip growing up …

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. 8 for O, e.g. : AT NO
5. Quibbles : CARPS
10. “M*A*S*H” actor : ALDA
14. Like bachelor parties : STAG
18. Excel : SHINE
20. Autumn color : OCHRE
21. Tea party host : MARCH HARE
23. Pie company exec? : PASTRY WHEEL
25. Bad brunch review? : OMELET PAN
26. Find new quarters for : REHOUSE
27. Winter fall : FLAKES
29. Film units : REELS
30. Michelangelo masterpiece : PIETA
31. MSN competitor : AOL
32. Cooking fat : SUET
34. Guadalajara girls : NINAS
37. Neighborhood with meat purveyors? : BUTCHER BLOCK
43. Air freshener scent : LILAC
46. Performed, in Shakespeare : DIDST
48. How surprise party guests should arrive : EARLY
49. Blanched : WAN
50. Yours, in Tours : A TOI
51. Doc bloc : AMA
52. Keisters : SEATS
54. “Momo” author Michael : ENDE
55. ATM code you rotate regularly? : ROLLING PIN
59. FICA benefit : SSI
60. Unit in Ohm’s Law : AMPERE
62. Costa del __ : SOL
63. Female antelope : DOE
64. Mellow : SOFTEN
66. Looked lecherously : LEERED
67. Suffix meaning “living substance” : -PLASM
69. Not yet on the sched. : TBA
70. Coast : GLIDE
72. Like many churches : SPIRED
75. Light : IGNITE
78. Adaptable truck, for short : UTE
79. “Bravo!” : OLE!
82. Barbershop parts : TENORS
83. Batman and the Boy Wonder, e.g. : DUO
84. Thief at a fertility clinic? : EGG POACHER
87. AA and AAA, e.g. : ORGS
88. Takes from a deck : DRAWS
90. “Do Ya” rock gp. : ELO
91. “I see” : AHSO
92. Starry-eyed agreement, often : I DO
93. Area below the abdomen : GROIN
95. Leslie of “Gigi” : CARON
97. Holders of roasts : SPITS
98. Nasty group of directors? : CUTTING BOARD
101. Like Dennis the Menace : PESKY
103. Part of Q.E.D. : ERAT
104. Bit of baby talk : GOO
105. Leg bone : TIBIA
108. Old will? : SHALT
111. Work (out) : REASON
114. Inflexible : ADAMANT
116. Stadium for a boxing match? : PUNCH BOWL
118. Journalists covering a spicy story? : GARLIC PRESS
121. Wood preservatives : CREOSOTES
122. Farm refrain : E-I-E-I-O
123. Spock’s father : SAREK
124. Firm employees: Abbr. : ATTS
125. Bone on a menu : OSSO
126. Some NCOs : SSGTS
127. Time at the inn : STAY

Down

1. Cleopatra killer : ASP
2. Choreographer Twyla : THARP
3. Japanese-American : NISEI
4. Without delay, as payment : ON THE NAIL
5. Intimidates : COWS
6. Advil target : ACHE
7. MLB scoreboard abbr. : RHE
8. Homes built indoors : PREFABS
9. Traitors : SELLOUTS
10. Crazily : AMOK
11. Like a flimsy excuse : LAME
12. Backstage theater workers : DRESSERS
13. An MRI may reveal a torn one : ACL
14. “Fiddler on the Roof” setting : SHTETL
15. Bind, in a way : TAPE
16. Asian sea : ARAL
17. Mil. bigwigs : GENS
19. Arousing : EROTIC
22. As a result of this : HEREBY
24. Chinese currency : YUAN
28. __-rock : ALT
33. Modern address : URL
35. Commonly used saws : ADAGES
36. Gullible sort : SIMP
38. Cut out : CEASE
39. “You lose a lot of time, __ people”: Marian Anderson : HATING
40. Dog tag datum : OWNER
41. Close-knit group : CADRE
42. Injured, in a way : KNEED
43. Drummer Ulrich : LARS
44. “Am __ late?” : I TOO
45. Hang loosely : LOLL
47. Place for an honoree : DAIS
53. Collection of heir pieces? : ESTATE
54. Blunt blade : EPEE
56. Do-nothing : IDLER
57. Wikipedia policy : NO ADS
58. Words indicating a delay : NOT NOW
60. Thomas associate : ALITO
61. Euripides tragedy : MEDEA
65. “Criminal Minds” agcy. : FBI
67. Some Olympians, nowadays : PROS
68. Leaf’s central vein : MIDRIB
71. Two-time Tony winner Patti : LUPONE
72. Zeno, notably : STOIC
73. Concealed : PERDU
74. Bullion unit : INGOT
76. Natural fertilizer : GUANO
77. Hungarian wine region : EGER
79. “I wasn’t expecting you” : OH HI
80. “__ we forget” : LEST
81. God with a quiver : EROS
85. Hardly haute cuisine : GLOP
86. Large South American rodents : CAPYBARAS
88. Easy paces : DOGTROTS
89. Misers : SCROOGES
93. Saddle-holding bands : GIRTHS
94. Tiny messenger : RNA
96. Keats, in a Shelley title : ADONAIS
97. Economizes : SKIMPS
99. AT&T and Verizon : TELCOS
100. Dept. of Justice bigwigs : AGS
102. Opp. of legato, in music : STAC
106. Still : INERT
107. Baffled : AT SEA
108. Humane org. : SPCA
109. On the disabled list, say : HURT
110. Without __: riskily : A NET
112. Farm females : EWES
113. “Not to mention … ” : ALSO …
114. Came down : ALIT
115. “Vaya con __” : DIOS
117. Bit of heckling : BOO
119. “Andy Capp” cartoonist Smythe : REG
120. __ blue : SKY

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